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Old 07-02-2018, 02:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry88 View Post
Could be, especially in Staten Island, but Hillary mauled Trump in NY. Same in NJ.

Trump's base is the white evangelists.
Trump's base is non-urban white people in general.
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Trump's base is non-urban white people in general.
Trump's base are white Evangelical Protestants.
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:03 AM
 
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by state
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Transplant Enclaves?-screen-shot-2013-12-06-3  
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:29 AM
 
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Gotta love when posters tell other posters that they can't speak on behalf of an entire group of other peoples, and then they speak on behalf of another group of peoples themselves.
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
And Louisiana has had a large white Catholic population for a while. Ditto any other part of the US with a lot of Italian and French heritage. Italian ancestry is common in the Northeast, Midwest, California, and parts of the South, French ancestry is common in Maine and Louisiana.

So I think the WASP phenomenon is no longer true in 2018. In fact, WASP includes some of the least prosperous white people in the country such as as Appalachians, so I'm not sure how they're better off than "ethnic whites".
Agreed, Appalachians are quite disadvantaged economically.
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:49 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Shoshanarose View Post
Agreed, Appalachians are quite disadvantaged economically.
Because of geography, and nothing else. Same for much of the south. They are geographically disadvantaged. And this disadvantage has been spreading to the Midwest too. People want to talk about race this, ethnicity that, but at the end of the day it is about geography. Coastal cities have geographical ability to dictate inland economies through trade. And people are inherently greedy, so if they can take advantage of their geographical advantage they will, putting people down characteristically as they execute their greedful strategies.
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Old 07-02-2018, 06:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Not Italians. They seem to be one of the most conservative white groups.
I know. What is that?
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Old 07-02-2018, 06:31 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by G-Dale View Post
Because of geography, and nothing else. Same for much of the south. They are geographically disadvantaged. And this disadvantage has been spreading to the Midwest too. People want to talk about race this, ethnicity that, but at the end of the day it is about geography. Coastal cities have geographical ability to dictate inland economies through trade. And people are inherently greedy, so if they can take advantage of their geographical advantage they will, putting people down characteristically as they execute their greedful strategies.
Yea, it's fascinating how geography interacts with policy and technology. Geography and weather patterns made much of the south relatively unattractive for decades as it was very difficult to cool off a home in humid heat, but the air conditioner paved the way for quite a few things. It used to be that an inland city without a deep and suitable anchorage for shipping along the river had little chance of becoming a prominent city, and you had crazy ventures like Dallas's failed attempt to build a major riverport at the end of the 1800s, but train, truck, and air shipping along with the selling of digital goods and services, made that as unimportant.

I think to say coastal cities today have a massive economic advantage is more of a holdover from the past though (as in going off an accrual from the head start they got in settlement within their region, though not always) given that there are so many inland cities without a major sea-bound port that rank among the fastest growing cities/metropolitan areas in the US. What you're seeing instead has been cities highly concentrated on manufacturing and often with large sea-bound port industries for shipping out that manufacturing in bulk with fairly little going on in other sectors were the ones that got hit hardest, but there were actually other inland cities that went through massive growth in the same time period.
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Old 07-02-2018, 07:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Yea, it's fascinating how geography interacts with policy and technology. Geography and weather patterns made much of the south relatively unattractive for decades as it was very difficult to cool off a home in humid heat, but the air conditioner paved the way for quite a few things. It used to be that an inland city without a deep and suitable anchorage for shipping along the river had little chance of becoming a prominent city, and you had crazy ventures like Dallas's failed attempt to build a major riverport at the end of the 1800s, but train, truck, and air shipping along with the selling of digital goods and services, made that as unimportant.

I think to say coastal cities today have a massive economic advantage is more of a holdover from the past though (as in going off an accrual from the head start they got in settlement within their region, though not always) given that there are so many inland cities without a major sea-bound port that rank among the fastest growing cities/metropolitan areas in the US. What you're seeing instead has been cities highly concentrated on manufacturing and often with large sea-bound port industries for shipping out that manufacturing in bulk with fairly little going on in other sectors were the ones that got hit hardest, but there were actually other inland cities that went through massive growth in the same time period.
Well certain coastal cities have excellent infrastructure that has never been built in many areas. Look st all the airports, seaports, trains, etc in NYC and certain East Coast and West Coast cities. A lot of inland areas do not have tve resources to build this out, but some inland area have and are doing so.
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Old 07-02-2018, 07:43 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Well certain coastal cities have excellent infrastructure that has never been built in many areas. Look st all the airports, seaports, trains, etc in NYC and certain East Coast and West Coast cities. A lot of inland areas do not have tve resources to build this out, but some inland area have and are doing so.
Part of that can be attributed to early settlement patterns and time of settlement. It was a lot of other things in addition to geography that made the northeast corridor as powerful as it is--after all, most early settlements in the US that survived were concentrated on the eastern seaboard and much of that was in the northeast. New York City and New York State were especially lucky in having one of the largest natural harbors in the world and a pretty easy cut inland to connect to the interior via waterways which is what most bulk shipping of goods needed to be economically viable. For a good while, the areas along the interior waterways were also doing very well and very competitive with the northeast seaboard outside of New York City. New York City was an exception because its connection to the interior though the Erie Canal and then later the railroads meant that its economy wasn't just tied to its use as a seaport to trade with the rest of the eastern seaboard or transatlantic trade, but also as an entrepot for trade with the interior.

And there was actually a lot of infrastructure built in the Midwest and the interior Northeastern cities. A lot of infrastructure. Airports, seaports (through rivers and the Great Lakes), trains, etc. were all built out really strongly. I think a lot of people don't understand how massively built up the cities in the Midwest used to be especially in comparison to other cities in the US at the time including the northeastern coastal cities. That manufacturing base was huge and the populations to sustain it were as well. Sure, a lot of inland areas didn't become major cities, but so did a lot of the coastal areas since you needed the confluence of several things like good anchorage, good potable water source, and some pathway to at least part of the interior to make it work.

The two major cities/geographical regions that were kind of outside of this, but still benefited from geography in different ways, were Southern California and South Florida. Southern California had terrible anchorage, but the selling to people of how great the region is with its climate really did actually power its growth and then a very much man-made seaport was built then to serve the massive influx of people. South Florida had very limited resources to connect to, but likewise its climate (South Florida along the barrier islands on the Atlantic side actually aren't nearly as swelteringly hot as the rest of Florida or the south) though it's natural port facilities were better than Southern California's at least.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 07-02-2018 at 08:02 AM..
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