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Old 07-11-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I'm wondering if Soundview was very rowhome heavy before the Bronx is Burning era.

And a disappointing observation I made is that the the modern rowhomes all look the same! They must have built a bunch of those cookie cutter rowhomes around the same time. It's crazy to me how much worse they look than even the vinyl sided ones. I even think the barrel front ones with the vinyl siding look pretty decent.

A non disappointing observation is that I found pockets of the Southeast Bronx where a lot of original architecture survives.
The areas along the water in parts of the Southeast Bronx had lots of bungalows because originally those areas were used for vacation homes, not to be lived in year round. That of course has changed. You can see this in the very southern parts of Soundview.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
The areas along the water in parts of the Southeast Bronx had lots of bungalows because originally those areas were used for vacation homes, not to be lived in year round. That of course has changed. You can see this in the very southern parts of Soundview.
Like Harding Park? That's an interesting neighborhood

And I was wondering is if the newer looking rowhomes in that area replaced mostly lower density rowhomes or midrise buildings.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Like Harding Park? That's an interesting neighborhood

And I was wondering is if the newer looking rowhomes in that area replaced mostly lower density rowhomes or midrise buildings.
Harding Park would be a good example. Most of those areas were originally low rise and thus still are today. There's no subway there so naturally people drove and still do. You don't build up too many areas without subways.

There are a few planned communities in the Bronx that don't have subways.

Co-op City was built on swamp land (hence the sinking issue) and they were given an express bus to and from Manhattan and a plethora of local bus routes to and from the closest subway (Pelham Bay Park in Pelham Bay).

Riverdale is also a planned neighborhood. Most of the enormous high rise buildings that exist today were able to be built because of the very strong foundation up there. You can see The Whitehall and 555 Kappock (RiverPoint Towers) all the way from the Major Deegan Expressway. The neighborhood has "windy streets" because the planner that designed the area decided to build the neighborhood around the rocky hilly foundation, so there is no street grid in Riverdale west of Broadway.

Because most of the Bronx was once part of Westchester, each neighborhood has a distinct feel architecturally. Riverdale was built as a neighborhood for rich Manhattanites from the beginning and thus still remains as such today with many Manhattanites moving there regularly.

City Island is another area you should look at in terms of architecture. It has a distinct "New England" feel, and like Riverdale, is completely different from the rest of the Bronx. In fact it reminds me a bit of Woodlawn with that small town feel, as City Island Avenue is what Katonah Avenue is to Woodlawn.
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Old 07-13-2018, 03:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Harding Park would be a good example. Most of those areas were originally low rise and thus still are today. There's no subway there so naturally people drove and still do. You don't build up too many areas without subways.

There are a few planned communities in the Bronx that don't have subways.

Co-op City was built on swamp land (hence the sinking issue) and they were given an express bus to and from Manhattan and a plethora of local bus routes to and from the closest subway (Pelham Bay Park in Pelham Bay).

Riverdale is also a planned neighborhood. Most of the enormous high rise buildings that exist today were able to be built because of the very strong foundation up there. You can see The Whitehall and 555 Kappock (RiverPoint Towers) all the way from the Major Deegan Expressway. The neighborhood has "windy streets" because the planner that designed the area decided to build the neighborhood around the rocky hilly foundation, so there is no street grid in Riverdale west of Broadway.

Because most of the Bronx was once part of Westchester, each neighborhood has a distinct feel architecturally. Riverdale was built as a neighborhood for rich Manhattanites from the beginning and thus still remains as such today with many Manhattanites moving there regularly.

City Island is another area you should look at in terms of architecture. It has a distinct "New England" feel, and like Riverdale, is completely different from the rest of the Bronx. In fact it reminds me a bit of Woodlawn with that small town feel, as City Island Avenue is what Katonah Avenue is to Woodlawn.
Harding Park is not that close to a subway, however I think a good chunk of Soundview is close to the 6 train.

City Island I would expect to have much different architecture considering it's not only an island but also a drive from the mainland.

As for unique architecture, that is true for different neighborhoods but I feel like a lot of them are pretty similar, such as the entirety of the South Bronx.
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Old 07-13-2018, 03:07 AM
 
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So it looks like the worst architecture in The Bronx was built in the 80s and 90s. I guess the developers were just trying to build as cheaply as possible. If only they had better foresight.

The recently built stuff (2010s) I find to be much more aesthetically pleasing than the 80s to 00s stuff (which from what I've seen is mostly generic and chea lookin). , even if I think it looks out of place and is less aesthetically pleasing than the original homes and buildings. I even think the old school vinyl siding rowhomes (epecially barrel front) are a huge step up visually from those super plain looking ones from the 80s and 90s.
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,594 posts, read 2,714,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Harding Park is not that close to a subway, however I think a good chunk of Soundview is close to the 6 train.

City Island I would expect to have much different architecture considering it's not only an island but also a drive from the mainland.

As for unique architecture, that is true for different neighborhoods but I feel like a lot of them are pretty similar, such as the entirety of the South Bronx.
Soundview is quite big, and I'd argue that the areas particularly south of the Bruckner are not at all close to the 6 train.
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