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Old 07-09-2018, 07:21 AM
 
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Remember when the ABC outlet was in the Bronx? You won't find me strolling around there during the day, but also I won't go into the less populated parts (which is most of the park) of Van Cortlandt alone during the day either. Or Inwood Hill Park for that matter.

Last edited by yodel; 07-09-2018 at 07:32 AM..
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Old 07-09-2018, 08:00 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
I don't have much familiarity with this part of the Bronx (south of the reservoir) that you and pierrepont are talking about, but I have read on this forum in the past that the area is known for a lot of robberies happening at night time to people on the streets. I don't know what it is about that area that makes it ideal for a robber, but yeah.
I know. It's kind of isolated and those step streets make for easy robberies. There's nothing else around and it's full of seedy types in apartment buildings. The areas further north are more stable (more homeowners and co-op types).
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Old 07-09-2018, 08:01 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Just because Woodlawn isn't extremely urban like Fordham doesn't mean it's the suburbs. It looks like mostly rowhomes and apartment buildings, that is not suburban.




Those look like rowhomes and multifamily homes, how is that suburban? Of course it's less urban that Fordham (one of the most urban places in the country), but that does not mean it's suburban.
It's suburban by NYC standards. Give it a rest already. No it's not Long Island, but it's right near Westchester and it has a small town feel. Besides yodel and I have been to the area. All you've done is looked at Google. A lot of the areas of the Bronx feel more like Westchester because they were once part of Westchester. In fact it's hard to tell where Yonkers begins and where Woodlawn ends for this reason.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
It's suburban by NYC standards. Give it a rest already. No it's not Long Island, but it's right near Westchester and it has a small town feel. Besides yodel and I have been to the area. All you've done is looked at Google. A lot of the areas of the Bronx feel more like Westchester because they were once part of Westchester. In fact it's hard to tell where Yonkers begins and where Woodlawn ends for this reason.
Westchester has urban areas too. I wouldn't describe Yonkers as being suburban.

You also have described Brooklyn Heights as being suburban so I take your standards on that with a grain of salt.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by yodel View Post
The borders of the neighborhood are more built up, but the overall feeling is suburban. Not suburban Oklahoma, but suburban for NYC.

Look at Westchester - the river towns have apartment buildings and main streets but they are still suburbs. Riverdale has lots of high rises, but it's still suburban overall in my opinion.
Quiet does not mean suburban in my opinion. What matters is built form and walkability. I can't use Manhattan and Fordham as my gauge for urbanity because then pretty much everywhere else in the country is suburbs including most of Philly and San Francisco, and even much of Brooklyn.

Riverdale is different because it has sections with windy streets and single family houses on large lot sizes.

I'm not too familiar with Yonkers but it looks pretty urban to me from what I've seen, almost like an extension of The Bronx.

And is that little patch by the Woodlawn 4 train station considered Woodlawn? Because it's all apartment buildings.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:28 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Westchester has urban areas too. I wouldn't describe Yonkers as being suburban.

You also have described Brooklyn Heights as being suburban so I take your standards on that with a grain of salt.
When have I described Brooklyn Heights as being suburban??? It's a bedroom community with a sleepy feel and why is that? Because that's what it was created for originally. It was a neighborhood for people who wanted to live close to Manhattan, hence bedroom community. You ask for information then want to bicker with native New Yorkers who know the history where they live at. I KNOW how Brooklyn Heights was formed. Do you? Do you know the history behind the neighborhood and how it was created?

Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Quiet does not mean suburban in my opinion. What matters is built form and walkability. I can't use Manhattan and Fordham as my gauge for urbanity because then pretty much everywhere else in the country is suburbs including most of Philly and San Francisco, and even much of Brooklyn.

Riverdale is different because it has sections with windy streets and single family houses on large lot sizes.

I'm not too familiar with Yonkers but it looks pretty urban to me from what I've seen, almost like an extension of The Bronx.

And is that little patch by the Woodlawn 4 train station considered Woodlawn? Because it's all apartment buildings.
No, the area by the Woodlawn 4 train station is not Woodlawn. It is technically Norwood. It is called Woodlawn as it is meant to be for the Woodlawn community, but Woodlawn (the neighborhood) has boundaries that are very clearly defined. The southern border stops where the cemetery begins.

Yodel is correct. It is suburban by NYC standards, and yes that's exactly what New Yorkers go off of when they call areas of NYC suburban. They compare it to Manhattan. Woodlawn does not have direct subway access. It functions more like a small town in Westchester, which is what it was annexed to originally. If you knew the history of the Bronx, you would know that many neighborhoods were orignally part of Westchester and thus share more in common with Westchester than other parts of NYC. Woodlawn is a perfect example of that. Most residents take Metro-North into Manhattan, as there is no direct subway serving the community. It is also quite isolated from the rest of the Bronx physically by Van Cortlandt Park and the cemetery. Residents thus are much more aligned to Westchester and do shopping either in Woodlawn or Yonkers.

Riverdale is actually very much like Woodlawn. Riverdale looks more suburban perhaps because it was a planned neighborhood with large lots prior to parts of it having more larger apartment buildings, but North Riverdale is hilly and suburban (not very walkable) and looks very similar to Woodlawn in parts. Outside of Katonah Avenue, much of Woodlawn isn't that pedestrian friendly either. Depending on where in Woodlawn you are, you may need a car to do things like grocery shopping as there is only one supermarket in the entire neighborhood.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:53 AM
 
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Obviously, everybody knows what gets my vote for architectural value in the Bronx (or NYC, or the world). One can find Victorian mansions and brownstones all over the English-speaking world, one can find grand boulevards in Paris and elsewhere, one can find Art Deco in Vienna (Austria) and elsewhere - but the architecture with the original NYC identity is the architecture of steel & brick towers for industrial and mass-residential purposes. Its architectural solidity, grand-scale urban architectural aesthetics, its intended highly communal-yet-highly private character are all a tremendous and enduring architectural value. Some of the NYC housing projects are in this architectural category too. If people who have lived in these places in the recent decades had the respect for their living spaces and for their neighbors, these buildings would be the best places to live in NYC, as they really are the pinnacle of two thousand years of architectural thinking.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:56 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Wait a minute... Why was my message deleted???
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:56 AM
 
2,591 posts, read 3,377,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Quiet does not mean suburban in my opinion. What matters is built form and walkability. I can't use Manhattan and Fordham as my gauge for urbanity because then pretty much everywhere else in the country is suburbs including most of Philly and San Francisco, and even much of Brooklyn.

Riverdale is different because it has sections with windy streets and single family houses on large lot sizes.

I'm not too familiar with Yonkers but it looks pretty urban to me from what I've seen, almost like an extension of The Bronx.

And is that little patch by the Woodlawn 4 train station considered Woodlawn? Because it's all apartment buildings.
I'd say that Yonkers has urban and suburban parts. The area of Yonkers over the border from Woodlawn is considered suburban by most I think - and yes it feels like an extension of Woodlawn. But Yonkers has a pretty big downtown too. Hastings on Hudson and Dobbs Ferry's downtowns are very small. Overall they are suburban in feel. Woodlawn is mostly made up of single family homes and overall it feels suburban to me by NYC standards.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by elnrgby View Post
Obviously, everybody knows what gets my vote for architectural value in the Bronx (or NYC, or the world). One can find Victorian mansions and brownstones all over the English-speaking world, one can find grand boulevards in Paris and elsewhere, one can find Art Deco in Vienna (Austria) and elsewhere - but the architecture with the original NYC identity is the architecture of steel & brick towers for industrial and mass-residential purposes. Its architectural solidity, grand-scale urban architectural aesthetics, its intended highly communal-yet-highly private character are all a tremendous and enduring architectural value. Some of the NYC housing projects are in this architectural category too. If people who have lived in these places in the recent decades had the respect for their living spaces and for their neighbors, these buildings would be the best places to live in NYC, as they really are the pinnacle of two thousand years of architectural thinking.
I do actually like the way the River Park Towers and Tracy Towers look.

I love how The West Bronx has a mix of 6 story buildings along with rowhomes (less of the tacky ones that places like Mott Haven and Longwood have), detached homes, and high rise apartment towers. It's the ideal urban layout to me.
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