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Old 07-08-2018, 09:37 AM
 
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So I've been really into residential architecture lately, but The Bronx has always been my favorite place for this. It's a pretty unique place (nowhere is really like it except for upper Manhattan) and its intense structural and population density impresses me. The West Bronx has some of the densest neighborhoods in the city even if you INCLUDE Manhattan. I don't think the Bronx even has any suburban areas besides the area North of the 1 train with the windy streets, and some of the communities on the water.

I have a few questions about the . Which neighborhoods have the most surviving pre "Bronx is Burning" era architecture? I understand that The West Bronx was not affected nearly as much as the East Bronx, but I would be interested to hear a further breakdown. I notice a lot of ugly, modern looking rowhomes in The Southeast Bronx, so I'm guessing this was one of the harder hit areas. It's a shame because I find neighborhoods with the old school midrise buildings to be much more aesthetically pleasing, plus I think neighborhoods with less driveways are more safe for pedestrians. And damn are those rowhomes ugly. Even the vinyl siding ones without driveways are a lot nicer looking in my opinion.

And do the 6 story buildings you find all over The Bronx typically have elevators? If so, they're definitely not "tenements" in my opinion, which people commonly refer to them as. I've seen people mention that The Bronx was originally intended for middle class people and I can definitely see that.

Another question is, why did Brooklyn develop so much differently? Most of the remaining architecture in both boroughs was built after the merge rather than before. I wonder why places like Bushwick aren't filled with 6 story buildings.
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,432 posts, read 34,489,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
So I've been really into residential architecture lately, but The Bronx has always been my favorite place for this. It's a pretty unique place (nowhere is really like it except for upper Manhattan) and its intense structural and population density impresses me. The West Bronx has some of the densest neighborhoods in the city even if you INCLUDE Manhattan. I don't think the Bronx even has any suburban areas besides the area North of the 1 train with the windy streets, and some of the communities on the water.

I have a few questions about the . Which neighborhoods have the most surviving pre "Bronx is Burning" era architecture? I understand that The West Bronx was not affected nearly as much as the East Bronx, but I would be interested to hear a further breakdown. I notice a lot of ugly, modern looking rowhomes in The Southeast Bronx, so I'm guessing this was one of the harder hit areas. It's a shame because I find neighborhoods with the old school midrise buildings to be much more aesthetically pleasing, plus I think neighborhoods with less driveways are more safe for pedestrians. And damn are those rowhomes ugly. Even the vinyl siding ones without driveways are a lot nicer looking in my opinion.

And do the 6 story buildings you find all over The Bronx typically have elevators? If so, they're definitely not "tenements" in my opinion, which people commonly refer to them as. I've seen people mention that The Bronx was originally intended for middle class people and I can definitely see that.

Another question is, why did Brooklyn develop so much differently? Most of the remaining architecture in both boroughs was built after the merge rather than before. I wonder why places like Bushwick aren't filled with 6 story buildings.
I only respond to you from now of if you post stuff like this.

Make the Brooklyn question another thread.

But to answer your question - Kingsbridge Heights is ground zero, the houses there are like nowhere else in the city

Maybe North Shore of Staten Island got a house or 2 like that

But the style is distinctively asscoiated with the BX, no question
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Old 07-08-2018, 02:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
I only respond to you from now of if you post stuff like this.

Make the Brooklyn question another thread.

But to answer your question - Kingsbridge Heights is ground zero, the houses there are like nowhere else in the city

Maybe North Shore of Staten Island got a house or 2 like that

But the style is distinctively asscoiated with the BX, no question
Oh yeah those houses are cool, and the presence of those homes is one thing that makes the West Bronx unique from upper Manhattan
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:07 PM
 
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I do believe that it had to do with the war ending and many troops coming back .. and many came to the BX.. which back then were considered luxury apts. And also the history of the BX is also very jewish.. if you notice some buildings ( older ones) have female names in the front as it was customary for the builder to name his work after his wife or daughter. The bronx also has the 2nd highest concentration in the US ( after South Beach) of Art Deco architecture ! The originator of the style is some Jewish dude as well. I also love seeing olf buildings in the bronx and some near Yankee stadium even have the original lobbies as welll.. very nice !

Furthermore... I beleive Brooklyn was not as united as the BX back in the day and had a different path to development ....

Williamsburg - industrial , Bushwick - german breweries / industrial .. Bedstuy - rich blacks.... so it was just different ya know.. makes for interesting reading though...


Keep us updated what you find
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Much of Brooklyn was developed earlier than the Bronx, and often developed as separate municipalities that were absorbed by Brooklyn before Brooklyn itself was combined into New York City. That earlier development and urbanization probably played a large part of why it's more low-rise compared to the Bronx where large parts of it was developed later and more or less as an extension of Upper Manhattan such as Washington Heights.
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:33 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,492,752 times
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Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Much of Brooklyn was developed earlier than the Bronx, and often developed as separate municipalities that were absorbed by Brooklyn before Brooklyn itself was combined into New York City. That earlier development and urbanization probably played a large part of why it's more low-rise compared to the Bronx where large parts of it was developed later and more or less as an extension of Upper Manhattan such as Washington Heights.
But weren't most of the buildings in Brooklyn built more recently than the borough merge? It seems like most of the architecture in Bushwick for instance, was built after Brooklyn became a part of NYC.
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:37 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,492,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Popfizz View Post
I do believe that it had to do with the war ending and many troops coming back .. and many came to the BX.. which back then were considered luxury apts. And also the history of the BX is also very jewish.. if you notice some buildings ( older ones) have female names in the front as it was customary for the builder to name his work after his wife or daughter. The bronx also has the 2nd highest concentration in the US ( after South Beach) of Art Deco architecture ! The originator of the style is some Jewish dude as well. I also love seeing olf buildings in the bronx and some near Yankee stadium even have the original lobbies as welll.. very nice !

Furthermore... I beleive Brooklyn was not as united as the BX back in the day and had a different path to development ....

Williamsburg - industrial , Bushwick - german breweries / industrial .. Bedstuy - rich blacks.... so it was just different ya know.. makes for interesting reading though...


Keep us updated what you find
That's interesting, thank you!

The female named buildings must have been a thing in Brooklyn too.
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:38 PM
 
11,217 posts, read 21,657,680 times
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I don't know the answer to your questions but just wanted to say if you ever get a chance to go on a free tour about Bronx architecture with this guy, you should do it. He's a fountain of knowledge, at least about the Grand Concourse. This link is from a past tour but I think he runs them from time to time, so see if there's a mailing list somewhere where you can get updated.

THE BRONX’S MAIN STREET: WALKING THE GRAND CONCOURSE WITH SAM GOODMAN
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:39 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,492,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henna View Post
I don't know the answer to your questions but just wanted to say if you ever get a chance to go on a free tour about Bronx architecture with this guy, you should do it. He's a fountain of knowledge, at least about the Grand Concourse. This link is from a past tour but I think he runs them from time to time, so see if there's a mailing list somewhere where you can get updated.

THE BRONX’S MAIN STREET: WALKING THE GRAND CONCOURSE WITH SAM GOODMAN
Interesting, I wonder if he's the guy from The Bronx episode of Parts Unknown.
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:43 PM
 
11,217 posts, read 21,657,680 times
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Interesting, I wonder if he's the guy from The Bronx episode of Parts Unknown.
Not sure. Here's a video of him and the Bronx. See if he looks familiar. [vimeo]3025467[/vimeo]
https://vimeo.com/3025467
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