U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-17-2018, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,182 posts, read 26,493,095 times
Reputation: 9054

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
People say this, but can you articulate on genuinely economic terms why that is so?

GE pays no taxes on immense profits. Probably biggest corporate leeches on the planet, perhaps rivaled only by HSBC.


Fortunes are passed from parent to child avoiding all taxation...leeching.


Yes, the leeching is all legal because the leeches write the tax codes.


To compare these thieves with poor families warehoused in ghettos, getting only a dilapidated roof over their heads is preposterous.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-17-2018, 08:52 AM
 
23,269 posts, read 16,114,118 times
Reputation: 8545
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
I (and a lot of other non-homeless NYers) pay a whole hell of a lot of taxes to fund the cops. Cut the taxes, and let me carry a gun (and use it if necessary), then we can talk about getting rid of the cops.

The homeless pay nothing. They just suck up services. Whatever money the can scrounge or steal usually goes to the local drug dealer (which is why they end up homeless.)
No, they do buy food and booze. The stores they buy whatever from are paying taxes. Alcohol has sales tax. If they buy cigarettes they pay sales tax. The drug dealer pays rent, and the landlord pays taxes.

Everyone pays taxes.

Many homeless people used to work, and therefore paid even more taxes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 08:58 AM
 
11,315 posts, read 16,833,442 times
Reputation: 5536
This is the latest variation of an old story.

I lived in Park Slope in the late 1990s. A very liberal neighborhood then and now. The armory had a shelter for homeless women. And damned if those liberals did not want them out of there.

I lived right across the street from it. Could be a bit grim at times. But even a right leaning person like me as some compassion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 09:01 AM
 
23,269 posts, read 16,114,118 times
Reputation: 8545
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Putting shelters in the areas that have the highest homeless problems makes sense. What's the point of putting homeless shelters in the most expensive neighborhoods where the homeless can't afford anything (including food)?
Dude, the problem is you make too many ASSumptions about things you know nothing about.

For starters, in those shelters there are caseworkers that refer those people to programs and agencies. They get them on a minimum of food stamps. Yes even Whole Foods takes food stamps, meaning homeless can afford to buy from there . Some welfare programs have cash assistance, so there are additional things homeless can buy such as a smartphone (needed to look for work).

Those who are disabled can get SSI.

Putting homeless shelters in the neighborhoods that have the highest concentration of poor people only benefits RACISTS like yourself and is a factor in ghettoization.

Manhattan, in addition to having more services the homeless need to get their lives together and go back to work, also has more schools for the homeless to receive job training and or education. Putting them on the fringes of the city and surrounding them in poverty makes it much less likely they can get the help or the work they need and further marginalizes them.

I get you don't want to see homeless people. But I do not care what you want.

De Blasio is doing the right thing by putting some of the homeless shelters in rich neighborhoods.

It also makes it more visible, and it NEEDS to be. Putting them in the fringes of the city allows certain people to pretend the problem doesn't exist. It needs to be out in the open, where everyone can see it and deal with it.

Don't like it?

Then work to end homelessness.

People like you hate unions and support Republicans who have constantly attacked working class people, who have offshored work, who have outsourced work from companies to temp agencies, etc. Obviously the minimum wage doesn't get you much in NYC, and people living from paycheck to paycheck are one disaster away from homelessness. And before you say they should move, NYC could not survive without it's low wage workers which make up the entire retail and service sector workforce.

So you support policies that lead to homelessness, they need to be in your neighborhood. Hopefully they take a dump on your doorstep.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,182 posts, read 26,493,095 times
Reputation: 9054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
This is the latest variation of an old story.

I lived in Park Slope in the late 1990s. A very liberal neighborhood then and now. The armory had a shelter for homeless women. And damned if those liberals did not want them out of there.

I lived right across the street from it. Could be a bit grim at times. But even a right leaning person like me as some compassion.

Two faced bastards fill both ends of the political spectrum. It is just that the right end, aka the WRONG end, of the spectrum gets most of the riches.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 11:32 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,592 posts, read 2,714,527 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Dude, the problem is you make too many ASSumptions about things you know nothing about.

For starters, in those shelters there are caseworkers that refer those people to programs and agencies. They get them on a minimum of food stamps. Yes even Whole Foods takes food stamps, meaning homeless can afford to buy from there . Some welfare programs have cash assistance, so there are additional things homeless can buy such as a smartphone (needed to look for work).

Those who are disabled can get SSI.

Putting homeless shelters in the neighborhoods that have the highest concentration of poor people only benefits RACISTS like yourself and is a factor in ghettoization.

Manhattan, in addition to having more services the homeless need to get their lives together and go back to work, also has more schools for the homeless to receive job training and or education. Putting them on the fringes of the city and surrounding them in poverty makes it much less likely they can get the help or the work they need and further marginalizes them.

I get you don't want to see homeless people. But I do not care what you want.

De Blasio is doing the right thing by putting some of the homeless shelters in rich neighborhoods.

It also makes it more visible, and it NEEDS to be. Putting them in the fringes of the city allows certain people to pretend the problem doesn't exist. It needs to be out in the open, where everyone can see it and deal with it.

Don't like it?

Then work to end homelessness.

People like you hate unions and support Republicans who have constantly attacked working class people, who have offshored work, who have outsourced work from companies to temp agencies, etc. Obviously the minimum wage doesn't get you much in NYC, and people living from paycheck to paycheck are one disaster away from homelessness. And before you say they should move, NYC could not survive without it's low wage workers which make up the entire retail and service sector workforce.

So you support policies that lead to homelessness, they need to be in your neighborhood. Hopefully they take a dump on your doorstep.
That's funny that anyone who disagrees with you is racist. You can't possibly believe that it benefits homeless people trying to get on their feet to live in the most expensive neighborhoods in NYC. That's exactly what should happen. They should spend what little money they do have on expensive items. I see those Ivy League schools are turning out real geniuses.

If I had my way de Blasio would've been out. I never voted for him. The only problem is too many bozos drinking the kool-aid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 12:03 PM
 
599 posts, read 196,668 times
Reputation: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
That's funny that anyone who disagrees with you is racist. You can't possibly believe that it benefits homeless people trying to get on their feet to live in the most expensive neighborhoods in NYC. That's exactly what should happen. They should spend what little money they do have on expensive items. I see those Ivy League schools are turning out real geniuses.

If I had my way de Blasio would've been out. I never voted for him. The only problem is too many bozos drinking the kool-aid.
Iím convinced heís not a black man. I donít know what he is

First of all even with food stamps being accepted at Whole Foods, that will stretch less there than it would in a low income area. Everything is up marked in manhattan. Homeless doesnít get extra cash assistance living in an expensive area in manhattan, they get the same amount.

The ghetto in nyc isnít necessarily the ghetto. They arenít sticking homeless shelters upstate or outside the boroughs, people still have accessible transportation to everywhere in the city. Once again, they canít expect a family of 4 to be able to build a life in that area, they wonít be able to afford it. They are setting them up to never get out the cycle of poverty. They would have to move out the area anyway to find affordable housing.

Itís really pointless and a PR move by Deblasio

He shouldnít even be opening any more shelters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 12:27 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,592 posts, read 2,714,527 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wakanda18 View Post
I’m convinced he’s not a black man. I don’t know what he is

First of all even with food stamps being accepted at Whole Foods, that will stretch less there than it would in a low income area. Everything is up marked in manhattan. Homeless doesn’t get extra cash assistance living in an expensive area in manhattan, they get the same amount.

The ghetto in nyc isn’t necessarily the ghetto. They aren’t sticking homeless shelters upstate or outside the boroughs, people still have accessible transportation to everywhere in the city. Once again, they can’t expect a family of 4 to be able to build a life in that area, they won’t be able to afford it. They are setting them up to never get out the cycle of poverty. They would have to move out the area anyway to find affordable housing.

It’s really pointless and a PR move by Deblasio

He shouldn’t even be opening any more shelters.
Agreed... It was de Blasio that said that housing homeless people close to their communities made the most sense, now he's sticking people in the most expensive neighborhoods, making it more difficult for them to turn their lives around. It's no secret that Whole Foods is expensive and people with money usually shop there. Just last week, I went in for a quick stop thinking, oh, I'll spend $25 or so just for a few items. Well those few items turned into more like $50 ($49 and change), as I started putting more items into my cart. lol I can assure you that if I wasn't making what I make, I would not be shopping at Whole Foods, as I wouldn't be able to afford to. I've seen people on food stamps shop there but it isn't the norm, and why would anyone shop at such a place when they barely have enough money to eat and are trying to get their lives turned around? Meanwhile this is the same person that talked about how you can spend $450 a month partying, but live in a ROOM. Not very logical...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 05:34 PM
 
2,682 posts, read 3,580,108 times
Reputation: 3093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
GE pays no taxes on immense profits. Probably biggest corporate leeches on the planet, perhaps rivaled only by HSBC.


Fortunes are passed from parent to child avoiding all taxation...leeching.


Yes, the leeching is all legal because the leeches write the tax codes.


To compare these thieves with poor families warehoused in ghettos, getting only a dilapidated roof over their heads is preposterous.
Leeching is the taking of something from one entity to another. Taxation is money that wasn't yours to begin with. Unless you can prove the money GE or HSBC has was somehow taken from someone rather than gained by industry then my point stands.

That said, we all have a responsibility to care for the least fortunate/most vulnerable among us. Part of that charge is ensuring that the resources devoted to such are directed in the means most beneficial.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2018, 05:44 PM
 
2,682 posts, read 3,580,108 times
Reputation: 3093
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Manhattan, in addition to having more services the homeless need to get their lives together and go back to work, also has more schools for the homeless to receive job training and or education. Putting them on the fringes of the city and surrounding them in poverty makes it much less likely they can get the help or the work they need and further marginalizes them.

I get you don't want to see homeless people. But I do not care what you want.

De Blasio is doing the right thing by putting some of the homeless shelters in rich neighborhoods.

It also makes it more visible, and it NEEDS to be. Putting them in the fringes of the city allows certain people to pretend the problem doesn't exist. It needs to be out in the open, where everyone can see it and deal with it.

Don't like it?

Then work to end homelessness.
I'm going to throw something out there: Homelessness in NY is very visible and especially in Manhattan. On a psychological level, I'd actually wager the in-your-face nature of the issue actually decreases human compassion. When you see the same faces in the same places for years or when a subway ride features 4 or 5 different people asking for change it actually hardens you to the issue. Does this excuse being ill compassionate? absolutely not. But for all of the services out there and money spent for the issue to keep getting worse and worse and worse makes one feel numb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top