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Old 07-16-2018, 11:15 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,589 posts, read 2,703,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Well they would not have been the first.

As mentioned, I used to see a lot of elderly Jews sitting outside and conversing in Yiddish in Bedford Park. I saw the same thing in St James Park on Jerome Avenue and even in Poe Park on Kingsbridge Road. Right up into the early 1990s.

Now, if these were the contemporaries of those who moved to Co-Op City, then they would have been a very aged group as well. So is it possible that this aged demographic simply died off with a youthful demographic prepared to replace them?

In short, I would think the Bronx ran out of Jewish folks to populate Co-op City, but had no shortage of a younger demographic to replace them in Co-Op City.
Well the Jews did die off in areas like Kingsbridge Heights and a lot also in Pelham Parkway, though there are still some hanging on there. You can still see some in Kingsbridge too, but most fled to Riverdale and never looked back and in fact you can still find some fresh from Israel in Riverdale. The NY Times refers to Riverdale as a "little sliver of land"... It's up in the hills away from the rest of the Bronx. lol I find the Jews in the Bronx much friendlier than elsewhere though despite all of the white flight.
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Old 07-16-2018, 11:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Well the Jews did die off in areas like Kingsbridge Heights and a lot also in Pelham Parkway, though there are still some hanging on there. You can still see some in Kingsbridge too, but most fled to Riverdale and never looked back and in fact you can still find some fresh from Israel in Riverdale. The NY Times refers to Riverdale as a "little sliver of land"... It's up in the hills away from the rest of the Bronx. lol I find the Jews in the Bronx much friendlier than elsewhere though despite all of the white flight.
If I may ask, are you African-American?
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Old 07-16-2018, 11:52 AM
 
2,591 posts, read 3,378,471 times
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I'm curious to know how much of the original architecture survived in The Bronx, after the arson wave of the 70s.

I know that in the 80s and 90s, the rebuilding effort included mostly ugly rowhomes with front driveways. I guess the developers at the time did not think midrise apartments were a good idea. Thankfully the recent architecture (2010s) is a lot better looking and is mostly midrise and higher. The modern architecture might look out of place, but at least it's a lot better than what they were building in the 90s and earlier. The 00s stuff wasn't great either, but better than the 80s/90s stuff at least.

Still though, it's a shame to me how many of the original buildings in the Central Bronx were lost.

I've been trying to do some research to see which neighborhoods survived the 70s arson wave the best. It looks like the neighborhoods West of Webster Ave are mostly intact, with the neighborhoods to the East being a case by case basis. It look like the neighborhoods along the 2 train, from Mott Haven to West Farms were hit the hardest, with the neighborhoods along the 6 not being hit as hard. It looks like whole chunks of Longwood and West Farms are gone and replaced with ugly rowhomes or weird Levitt style houses.

Is that accurate? And what are some things I'm missing?

And are the aformentioned ugly rowhomes planned by the city, or did private developers decide to make a bunch of similar looking houses?
I know there were some parts of the South Bronx rebuilt with much lower density (like the famous or infamous Charlotte Street). I think those houses are really unattractive, but suburban development was considered the ideal for a very long time and I think some community groups at the time were advocating for this type of development.

I think that the South Bronx would have received much more gentrification were it not for the sheer ugliness and cheapness of a lot of the construction that replaced the original buildings.
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Old 07-16-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Originally Posted by Moth View Post
If I may ask, are you African-American?
LMAO... Maybe in another life? I'm Sicilian. Why the question?
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
I guess I have to agree because I don't find the urban parts of the Bronx very aesthetically pleasing at all. Ditto for much of Upper Manhattan. Too many people and the same ugly buildings block after block and it's dirty too.
A lot of people would disagree. Personally I love upper Manhattan and find that type of development very attractive. When we moved to Bedford Park from Inwood, we liked that the look and feel were similar.

Other people prefer suburban development, but obviously less than in the past.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by yodel View Post
A lot of people would disagree. Personally I love upper Manhattan and find that type of development very attractive. When we moved to Bedford Park from Inwood, we liked that the look and feel were similar.

Other people prefer suburban development, but obviously less than in the past.
I don't think Bedford Park fits in with what he and I were describing.

BP is a lovely neighborhood and would be in any city.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:10 PM
 
11,311 posts, read 16,823,077 times
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
LMAO... Maybe in another life? I'm Sicilian. Why the question?
Just curious. Not important at all.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:10 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,569,598 times
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Originally Posted by yodel View Post
I know there were some parts of the South Bronx rebuilt with much lower density (like the famous or infamous Charlotte Street). I think those houses are really unattractive, but suburban development was considered the ideal for a very long time and I think some community groups at the time were advocating for this type of development.

I think that the South Bronx would have received much more gentrification were it not for the sheer ugliness and cheapness of a lot of the construction that replaced the original buildings.
Yeah a lot of the South Bronx's 80s through 2000s construction is hideous, those Nehemiah style houses especially. I think Highbridge and Concourse will gentrify more rapidly due to mostly surviving original architecture.

And I don't consider rowhomes suburban, but it does seem like they were going for a fake suburban vibe with the front driveways on most of those. And the Charlotte street development has an actual suburban layour which is kind of bizarre.

As for the development, I'm guessing there weren't many deveopers in the 1980s willing to spend the money to build midrise apartments in Mott Haven or Longwood. It looks like that picked back up in the 00s.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:11 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,589 posts, read 2,703,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
A lot of people would disagree. Personally I love upper Manhattan and find that type of development very attractive. When we moved to Bedford Park from Inwood, we liked that the look and feel were similar.

Other people prefer suburban development, but obviously less than in the past.
I like parts of Inwood WEST of Broadway. Nice buildings with distinctive architecture with lots of green. EAST of Broadway however is pretty ugly. The same plain building, one right after another.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:12 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,569,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
A lot of people would disagree. Personally I love upper Manhattan and find that type of development very attractive. When we moved to Bedford Park from Inwood, we liked that the look and feel were similar.

Other people prefer suburban development, but obviously less than in the past.
I love the buildings in the East Village/LES, upper Manhattan, and the West Bronx.
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