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Old 07-16-2018, 06:02 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
Reputation: 5949

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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Me too. They all feel very New York.
Yeah, that type of layout is as it NYC as it gets in my opinion. There is barely anywhere else in the country that resembles those places.
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Old 07-16-2018, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 976,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Fieldston is in Riverdale (it is a subsection within Riverdale) and has several expensive and exclusive private schools. In fact they are ranked as some of the most expensive and best private schools not only in New York City, but in the entire country.

1. Riverdale Country School

2. Horace Mann School

3. Ethical Culture Fieldston School

The tuition at just about all of these schools is ~$40,000 - 45,000 a year.

Plenty of parents in Westchester and Manhattan send their kids here. They either drive them or they take the express bus. You will see them in the mornings going to Riverdale.

Manhattan College is also another private school located in the Fieldston section just up the hills from the 1 train (242nd street). Walk up the hilly Manhattan College Parkway and you enter another world. It feels nothing like "the Bronx". From Manhattan College Parkway, you enter the private community of Fieldston with many historic houses on large lots, some of which are mansions.

Bronx Science High School is an elite public school in Bedford Park not too far from Lehman College. The Northwest Bronx is probably the nicest parts of the Bronx. You have Riverdale (including all subsections Spuyten Duyvil, Fieldston, North Riverdale, Central Riverdale, etc.), Woodlawn, Van Cortlandt Village... All nice neighborhoods.
My dad moved from Sweden to NYC and went to Bronx Science a few years later. Small world.
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Old 07-16-2018, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,503 posts, read 17,196,726 times
Reputation: 2043
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
University Ave on the blocks you listed:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8526...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8553...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8600...7i13312!8i6656

Teller:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8337...7i13312!8i6656


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8358...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8389...7i13312!8i6656

Findlay:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8303...7i13312!8i6656



https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8340...7i13312!8i6656


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8359...7i13312!8i6656

Maybe the single family houses in the first University Ave pic replaced arson, but I'm guessing not because they don't look like cheap POS


Yeah I know Park and 3rd were hit pretty hard. Going East, that looks like where things started to get real bad.




Weren't these West Bronx neighborhoods mostly void of white people by the time the arson hit?

And do you know if there are any large chunks of the 2 train neighborhoods that survived, besides the ones North of of West Farms?

And do you know if the West Bronx was economically better off than the Central Bronx at the time, even if it was also lower income?
University past W 183rd was fine.

You know the arson wasn't just vacant lots right? Those buildings on University below Burnside were rehabilitated, meaning they were hit with arson, were abandoned, had no windows. Obviously, you won't notice the difference now because they were fixed. You won't be able to tell. Just case a neighborhood has its original housing stock doesn't mean it wasn't hit hard by the arson. All those Morris Heights buildings are NYCHA now.

This is the University Heights area of Harrison, Aqueduct, Grand.


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

^^Those red houses were built on vacant land.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

you see it has the in unit AC^

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

I believe all those homes^^

The original housing is gone. On those streets.



Here:
https://www.historicaerials.com/viewer

^^ That's a cool website were you can see Satellite imagery of NYC in the 1980's. You can see which areas had the most vacant lots. You can also compare the same image to 1995, and the 2000's. Pretty much everywhere south of Fordham has pockets of Vacant land. I would say once you get to East Tremont/West Farms and points south it really starts getting crazy.
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Old 07-17-2018, 02:53 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
Reputation: 5949
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
University past W 183rd was fine.

You know the arson wasn't just vacant lots right? Those buildings on University below Burnside were rehabilitated, meaning they were hit with arson, were abandoned, had no windows. Obviously, you won't notice the difference now because they were fixed. You won't be able to tell. Just case a neighborhood has its original housing stock doesn't mean it wasn't hit hard by the arson. All those Morris Heights buildings are NYCHA now.

This is the University Heights area of Harrison, Aqueduct, Grand.


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

^^Those red houses were built on vacant land.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

you see it has the in unit AC^

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

I believe all those homes^^

The original housing is gone. On those streets.



Here:
https://www.historicaerials.com/viewer

^^ That's a cool website were you can see Satellite imagery of NYC in the 1980's. You can see which areas had the most vacant lots. You can also compare the same image to 1995, and the 2000's. Pretty much everywhere south of Fordham has pockets of Vacant land. I would say once you get to East Tremont/West Farms and points south it really starts getting crazy.
Oh yeah I was aware that University Heights had some pockets of those 80s/90s rowhomes like that, but it's just pockets here and there as opposed to Longwood or West Farms where it might be more than half the neighborhood. Interestingly, Soundview has some homes like that built in the 50s. I guess American society was becoming more autocentric around that time (probably earlier), so some of the developments from then reflect that.

And yeah I'm aware that a surviving building might have been arsoned at one point or otherwise abandoned. But I still think it's very noteworthy that the vast majority of original architecture in the West Bronx has survived, as opposed to the Central Bronx.
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Old 07-17-2018, 03:02 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
Reputation: 5949
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
University past W 183rd was fine.

You know the arson wasn't just vacant lots right? Those buildings on University below Burnside were rehabilitated, meaning they were hit with arson, were abandoned, had no windows. Obviously, you won't notice the difference now because they were fixed. You won't be able to tell. Just case a neighborhood has its original housing stock doesn't mean it wasn't hit hard by the arson. All those Morris Heights buildings are NYCHA now.

This is the University Heights area of Harrison, Aqueduct, Grand.


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

^^Those red houses were built on vacant land.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

you see it has the in unit AC^

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9073215

I believe all those homes^^

The original housing is gone. On those streets.



Here:
https://www.historicaerials.com/viewer

^^ That's a cool website were you can see Satellite imagery of NYC in the 1980's. You can see which areas had the most vacant lots. You can also compare the same image to 1995, and the 2000's. Pretty much everywhere south of Fordham has pockets of Vacant land. I would say once you get to East Tremont/West Farms and points south it really starts getting crazy.

And wow, I looked at the aerial images over Longwood between 1974 and 1980, how depressing!

And I did the same with University Heights and I do see the pockets of vacant lots you're talking about, but it's still a lot better. And keep in mind the shading is different for all the older ones (for some reason 95 looks worse than even the one from 66). The shading for the 1980 one is pretty light, so I wonder if you mistakenly thought some of the buildings on Findlay, Teller, etc. were vacant lots. I did a virtual tour of those blocks and searched the build date of several of the houses/buildings, it looks like mostly original construction.

Also, I notice that the Central Bronx already had plenty of damage by 1974. What year did the burning begin, and when did it stop?

And it's also interesting to read the other theories that it was not just arson, but also service cuts by the city that led to these neighborhoods being underserved by the fire department.

Last edited by l1995; 07-17-2018 at 03:33 AM..
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Old 07-17-2018, 06:13 AM
 
3,181 posts, read 1,099,660 times
Reputation: 1334
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
And wow, I looked at the aerial images over Longwood between 1974 and 1980, how depressing!

And I did the same with University Heights and I do see the pockets of vacant lots you're talking about, but it's still a lot better. And keep in mind the shading is different for all the older ones (for some reason 95 looks worse than even the one from 66). The shading for the 1980 one is pretty light, so I wonder if you mistakenly thought some of the buildings on Findlay, Teller, etc. were vacant lots. I did a virtual tour of those blocks and searched the build date of several of the houses/buildings, it looks like mostly original construction.

Also, I notice that the Central Bronx already had plenty of damage by 1974. What year did the burning begin, and when did it stop?

And it's also interesting to read the other theories that it was not just arson, but also service cuts by the city that led to these neighborhoods being underserved by the fire department.
Just be glad your too young to have lived thru it. It was a grim time. I mean kids find a way to make an adventure of their sorrounding. We played and made the best of it. Yet, growing up in this time was demaging to many kids who thought if they lived amongst the destruction then they were themselves refuse. Services were poor by the City, people looked down on Bronx residents and some kids just took it as part of the natural order to just not give a F. Ruined lives resulted in that atmosphere.
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Old 07-17-2018, 06:40 AM
 
11,287 posts, read 16,808,067 times
Reputation: 5517
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
And wow, I looked at the aerial images over Longwood between 1974 and 1980, how depressing!

And I did the same with University Heights and I do see the pockets of vacant lots you're talking about, but it's still a lot better. And keep in mind the shading is different for all the older ones (for some reason 95 looks worse than even the one from 66). The shading for the 1980 one is pretty light, so I wonder if you mistakenly thought some of the buildings on Findlay, Teller, etc. were vacant lots. I did a virtual tour of those blocks and searched the build date of several of the houses/buildings, it looks like mostly original construction.

Also, I notice that the Central Bronx already had plenty of damage by 1974. What year did the burning begin, and when did it stop?

And it's also interesting to read the other theories that it was not just arson, but also service cuts by the city that led to these neighborhoods being underserved by the fire department.

There was still the occasional fire via arson well into the 1980s, but the frequency was diminished.

Buildings were generally torched for three reasons; The landlords wanted to "cash out", residents would set the fire themselves so as to jump to the head of the line for public housing, and junkies would torch it to get the copper pipes.
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Old 07-17-2018, 06:59 AM
 
3,181 posts, read 1,099,660 times
Reputation: 1334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
There was still the occasional fire via arson well into the 1980s, but the frequency was diminished.

Buildings were generally torched for three reasons; The landlords wanted to "cash out", residents would set the fire themselves so as to jump to the head of the line for public housing, and junkies would torch it to get the copper pipes.
The most systematic and organised system was done by the landlords. They had a protocol and hired arsonist. A individual could set fire to his unit perhaps but fires that take out a whole building is set in a specific way. Junkies would get copper but I doubt they set fire to an intact building. Now what I recall is that often the same building would have several fires. First try failed. Second try, failed. Third might have done the trick. The initial wave of arson was all the landlords. Once the buildings were partly burned then the tenants got into the act. There were building that were half inhabited. I dont know if that was legal but I recall tenements that had units that were burnt out with units with families on other floors. Heck if you lives besides a few burnt out units you might want to get out yourself
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Old 07-17-2018, 07:11 AM
 
11,287 posts, read 16,808,067 times
Reputation: 5517
Quote:
Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
The most systematic and organised system was done by the landlords. They had a protocol and hired arsonist. A individual could set fire to his unit perhaps but fires that take out a whole building is set in a specific way. Junkies would get copper but I doubt they set fire to an intact building. Now what I recall is that often the same building would have several fires. First try failed. Second try, failed. Third might have done the trick. The initial wave of arson was all the landlords. Once the buildings were partly burned then the tenants got into the act. There were building that were half inhabited. I dont know if that was legal but I recall tenements that had units that were burnt out with units with families on other floors. Heck if you lives besides a few burnt out units you might want to get out yourself
More or less correct. A pretty ugly situation.

When tenants did it, they would pass the word ("The fire is tonight") and go to bed fully clothed and with shoes on.
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Old 07-17-2018, 07:19 AM
 
2,591 posts, read 3,374,308 times
Reputation: 1293
Has anyone ran across statistics about how many people died in the waves of arson? This is something I never hear of but people must have died. I wonder if any of the landlords were charged with murder.
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