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Old 07-15-2018, 10:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
In the Belmont area the dividing line was 183 around St Barnabas. From the Fordham side it was intact. Move South of St Barnabas around Prospect and Crotona and it was like crossing a boarder into a war zone. Today it looks nothing like the Bronx I grew up in during the 80s. You could walk along Third Ave around Crotona Park and only see Schools and Projects everything was burned down lots. Even Highbridge had its share. But the worst neighbor hoods were Morrisania, Hunts PT. Concourse was saved luckily. But you could walk between the D Train to the 4 train between 170st or 176 and see wrecks of buildings. Burnside Ave actually looked burned in big pockets. By the time you got to 167 the demage stopped.
This is all Belmont South of 183rd st.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8502...thumbfov%3D100

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8519...thumbfov%3D100


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8514...thumbfov%3D100

Looks mostly original to me. However I do see pockets South of 183rd st that look like they must have been destroyed.

Hunts Point looks like it has a lot of surviving architecture, more so than Mott Haven for sure. I wonder if that's because the subway access is kind of poor for much of the neighborhood?

Last edited by l1995; 07-15-2018 at 10:21 AM..
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Oh and I not only find those rowhomes to be any eyesore, but in my opinion they make the blocks more dangerous to walk down. Yes detached houses also have front driveways, but they're seperated by a house's width as opposed to as much as a whole block being a driveway

I wonder if any studies have been done on this
They didnít wa t to replace burned down tenements with even more projects. The Bronx was not desirable to live in and they did not want to concentrate more people in there.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
The Western Bronx was last to burn. I grew up on 183 and Webster in the projects so we were safe. But I remember my father and uncle's taking me to watch the fire fighters put out fires in Tremenont, and around Jerome Ave. Infact Park Ave near us had many building get burned down. My aunt lived on 183 and Park and that buidlibg is gone. Lots of building have been rebuilt. Yet, there was devastation on eveey block. We lived in a building on 182 and Grand Ave off of Burnsixe that was destroyed soon after we moved out Thats Morris Heights right ?
I'm not saying there was no blight in the West Bronx, but it looks like in all of the West Bronx neighborhoods (West of Webster Ave), at least 90% of the original buildings survived. And I'm guessing not all of the new construction is there to replace arson buildings.

Park Avenue and East looks like it had a lot more damage, is that where you grew up?
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
They didnít wa t to replace burned down tenements with even more projects. The Bronx was not desirable to live in and they did not want to concentrate more people in there.
I understand that. At the time it made sense, but nowadays there's a lot of demand to live in The Bronx. And even in the 90s and 00s there was massive amounts of immigration to The Bronx.

Do you happen to know if those modern rowhomes are subsidized?
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:22 AM
 
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You had blocks along the Concourse from Fordham South that were largely intact but you would have a building or two every block that was demolished after a fire. I remember walking on Valentine Ave which was largely undemaged and seeing lots of where a building had been. For example new houses were built along3s 184 and Marion Ave where a buidling stood. Building were demolished on and adjacent to Webster around 187. I recall one was a rather large building. Now let me tell you, having that happen to a neighborhood againgst tge backdrop of what was happening sent a chill down the heart of the residents. Often led to other landlords cutting back repairs, it was ugly and dangerous. The more I recall the more I recall buidlings that I recall were burnt down adjacent to Fordham near Jerome. Its a shame but you have to factor in that some areas had safer fire proof buildings. If not for that the fires would have been even more common North of Fordham and amonst the worst hit areas
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I'm not saying there was no blight in the West Bronx, but it looks like in all of the West Bronx neighborhoods (West of Webster Ave), at least 90% of the original buildings survived. And I'm guessing not all of the new construction is there to replace arson buildings.

Park Avenue and East looks like it had a lot more damage, is that where you grew up?
I guess it depends on what you considered blighted. How many buildings per block does it have to be for you ? Define your terms.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
You had blocks along the Concourse from Fordham South that were largely intact but you would have a building or two every block that was demolished after a fire. I remember walking on Valentine Ave which was largely undemaged and seeing lots of where a building had been. For example new houses were built along3s 184 and Marion Ave where a buidling stood. Building were demolished on and adjacent to Webster around 187. I recall one was a rather large building. Now let me tell you, having that happen to a neighborhood againgst tge backdrop of what was happening sent a chill down the heart of the residents. Often led to other landlords cutting back repairs, it was ugly and dangerous. The more I recall the more I recall buidlings that I recall were burnt down adjacent to Fordham near Jerome. Its a shame but you have to factor in that some areas had safer fire proof buildings. If not for that the fires would have been even more common North of Fordham and amonst the worst hit areas
It looks like most of the buildings in The West Bronx are elevator buildings rather than the walkup tenements you find a lot of in The Central Bronx (the ones that survived). But not only are the former more fire resistant, but wouldn't they have residents that were comparatively more affluent (meaning less incentive to burn down those buildings)?

And for the Central Bronx, it looks like the tenements on main roads mostly survived. Like how 138th st in Mott Haven is original, but many of the side blocks are not.

Thinking about the neighborhoods that did burn down though, it was pure evil would the landlords did. All those people displaced, and all that beautiful architecture lost.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
I guess it depends on what you considered blighted. How many buildings per block does it have to be for you ? Define your terms.
I consider it to have survived if you walk down that block and see a wall of original buildings/rowhouses. Which I do think is the case for most of the West Bronx, with some exceptions.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:59 AM
 
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There were blocks that were not demaged even in the worst areas in Hunts Pt too.
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Old 07-15-2018, 11:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bxlover View Post
There were blocks that were not demaged even in the worst areas in Hunts Pt too.
Yeah I noticed that. I wonder if being further from a subway line is part of the reason. Or maybe because it's rowhome heavy?
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