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Old 07-16-2018, 12:15 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,005 posts, read 16,576,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
Sour grapes because the U.S. cannot play soccer.

Fat lazy Americans choose instead, a game like baseball that allows them to spend 90% of the game standing like statues.

Have any baseball player run around for 90 minutes and you'd have a corpse on the field by half time.
Come on. Have the French national soccer team take turns at bat while Clayton Kershaw tosses 90 mph fastballs over the plate. Horses for courses.

Then there are pleny of American athletes playing sports that exhibit extreme athleticism and endurance. Basketball for an obvious example.

The US soccer program is not turning out top class players, but not because of "Fat Americans". Don't get me wrong, America has an obesity problem, but blaming our soccer performance on that is simply wrong.
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Old 07-16-2018, 01:59 PM
Status: "Halloween! Can't wait." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Manhattan
1,792 posts, read 763,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Four, the United States has some very generous immigration laws for those seeking to invest/start a business in the USA , EB-5 and so forth.

Ahhh...mystery solved.
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Old 07-16-2018, 02:00 PM
Status: "Halloween! Can't wait." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Manhattan
1,792 posts, read 763,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Dale View Post
There policy leads to brain drains.
Yep. You said it.
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Old 07-18-2018, 01:51 AM
 
7,574 posts, read 8,000,657 times
Reputation: 8091
There's been a French invasion in NYC for several years. Chelsea, Battery Park, parts of Brooklyn, UES. There are more Maison Keysers in NYC than all of France and they keep opening more of them. The French have moved into Forest Hills now too. There's that French Food Court near the Freedom Tower and it's huge. They are educated, well-off, and speak English. There are new private French preschools opening and of course, the dual language public schools that work with the French Ministry of Education. Most are from urban areas so they feel comfortable here. I belong to several French-speaking Meet-up groups and new ones keep forming every other week.
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Old 07-18-2018, 07:52 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,175 posts, read 21,784,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
There's been a French invasion in NYC for several years. Chelsea, Battery Park, parts of Brooklyn, UES. There are more Maison Keysers in NYC than all of France and they keep opening more of them. The French have moved into Forest Hills now too. There's that French Food Court near the Freedom Tower and it's huge. They are educated, well-off, and speak English. There are new private French preschools opening and of course, the dual language public schools that work with the French Ministry of Education. Most are from urban areas so they feel comfortable here. I belong to several French-speaking Meet-up groups and new ones keep forming every other week.
What you say is accurate, but Maison Kayser having more stores here than in France as an examplea of this is odd since Maison Kayser purpose here is to be an authentic French boulangerie and France actually has quite a few of those with or without more Maison Kaysers.
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Old 07-18-2018, 02:36 PM
 
18,315 posts, read 11,709,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
What you say is accurate, but Maison Kayser having more stores here than in France as an examplea of this is odd since Maison Kayser purpose here is to be an authentic French boulangerie and France actually has quite a few of those with or without more Maison Kaysers.
Not odd at all; French consumers are different than Americans, and as you say competition among boulangeries in France is keen.


Eric Kayser (as shops are known in Paris) is nothing more than one of many chain boulangeries found all over that city and France in general.


Unless things have changed the Kayser shops in Paris (like other bakeries) is just that, a place that sells various breads and other baked goods. Coffee and other beverages are not to be found.


OTOH Americans expect an "all in one" sort of place where they can get both so...




https://france-amerique.com/en/maiso...a-large-scale/
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Old 07-18-2018, 03:54 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,589 posts, read 2,707,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
What you say is accurate, but Maison Kayser having more stores here than in France as an examplea of this is odd since Maison Kayser purpose here is to be an authentic French boulangerie and France actually has quite a few of those with or without more Maison Kaysers.
Maison Kayser is basically targeting the Le Pain Quotidien customers, which is not French as many seem to think - they're Belgian from Bruxelles (Brussels). I remember when one of the first Le Pain Quotidien stores opened by Bryant Park. Since then there have been many more, and if you notice, wherever there's a LPQ there's usually a Maison Kayser nearby. Maison Kayser has been expanding rapidly. I've only eaten at two of their locations, and quite frankly I don't find their coffee that great, and the food seems to be prepared in advance. I had breakfast one Saturday morning at the Bryant Park location (technically closer to 5th Avenue) and while everything tasted fine, I wasn't blown away. Le Pain Quotidien serves food of better quality that seems to generally be made on the spot. Better coffee too as long as you're not ordering anything that requires a real barista. The one thing that keeps me going back to Maison Kayser is their éclairs. They're really tasty and believe me, I've had horrible ones in the past so I know good ones. The hilarious part was that I was taken to the place that served horrible éclairs by a colleague from France. He kept apologizing profusely because we both agreed that the food was pretty pathetic. Chez Laurence is the name of the place, which is closed (as it should be).

Last edited by pierrepont7731; 07-18-2018 at 04:03 PM..
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Old 07-18-2018, 04:00 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,589 posts, read 2,707,651 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Not odd at all; French consumers are different than Americans, and as you say competition among boulangeries in France is keen.


Eric Kayser (as shops are known in Paris) is nothing more than one of many chain boulangeries found all over that city and France in general.


Unless things have changed the Kayser shops in Paris (like other bakeries) is just that, a place that sells various breads and other baked goods. Coffee and other beverages are not to be found.


OTOH Americans expect an "all in one" sort of place where they can get both so...




https://france-amerique.com/en/maiso...a-large-scale/
Probably explains their crappy coffee. I'm generally not over wowed by French places that serve coffee, but Maison Kayser is just blah. They used to serve Filicori Zecchini coffee for a while and their coffee is decent provided it is made properly (I frequent some of their coffee shops here too, as I'm familiar with their coffee - from Emilia-Romagna (Bologna to be exact)), and then they switched to another coffee... Still just ok. Nothing great.
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Old 07-18-2018, 04:31 PM
 
Location: In the heights
20,175 posts, read 21,784,368 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Not odd at all; French consumers are different than Americans, and as you say competition among boulangeries in France is keen.


Eric Kayser (as shops are known in Paris) is nothing more than one of many chain boulangeries found all over that city and France in general.


Unless things have changed the Kayser shops in Paris (like other bakeries) is just that, a place that sells various breads and other baked goods. Coffee and other beverages are not to be found.


OTOH Americans expect an "all in one" sort of place where they can get both so...




https://france-amerique.com/en/maiso...a-large-scale/
My response was to the idea of Maison Kaysers being in greater numbers here than in France are an example of French immigration to the US which I don't think is a good example. Eric Kaysers in Paris are simply chain boulangeries that are mostly unremarkable. However, here they find themselves representative of French boulangeries though structured for NYC consumer habits and identifiably French while serving a much larger non-French population. I do not think its larger numbers here in NYC than in France are a strong indicator of the French population that has moved here. Bien Cuit and the like are more representative of that.
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Old 07-18-2018, 04:49 PM
 
Location: In the heights
20,175 posts, read 21,784,368 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Maison Kayser is basically targeting the Le Pain Quotidien customers, which is not French as many seem to think - they're Belgian from Bruxelles (Brussels). I remember when one of the first Le Pain Quotidien stores opened by Bryant Park. Since then there have been many more, and if you notice, wherever there's a LPQ there's usually a Maison Kayser nearby. Maison Kayser has been expanding rapidly. I've only eaten at two of their locations, and quite frankly I don't find their coffee that great, and the food seems to be prepared in advance. I had breakfast one Saturday morning at the Bryant Park location (technically closer to 5th Avenue) and while everything tasted fine, I wasn't blown away. Le Pain Quotidien serves food of better quality that seems to generally be made on the spot. Better coffee too as long as you're not ordering anything that requires a real barista. The one thing that keeps me going back to Maison Kayser is their éclairs. They're really tasty and believe me, I've had horrible ones in the past so I know good ones. The hilarious part was that I was taken to the place that served horrible éclairs by a colleague from France. He kept apologizing profusely because we both agreed that the food was pretty pathetic. Chez Laurence is the name of the place, which is closed (as it should be).
The cute one is Pret A Manger which isn't French at all despite its name.

All these international chains vying for market share and we can't get a goddamn Nando's?
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