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Old 07-21-2018, 02:12 PM
 
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They are cool but they have thin floors and are creaky. It sucks living below someone who is heavy footed.
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Old 07-21-2018, 02:37 PM
 
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I live on the 5th flr of a "pre-war" and I hate it!!! My neighborhood is quiet, lots of stores near by, and even though I am still a spring chicken my knees hate it all. I'm freaked out about a possible fire and when another tenant gets a leak, all of the water is shut off for long periods of time. I can't wait to move into a new building.
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Old 07-21-2018, 03:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AnotherFowler View Post
I live on the 5th flr of a "pre-war" and I hate it!!! My neighborhood is quiet, lots of stores near by, and even though I am still a spring chicken my knees hate it all. I'm freaked out about a possible fire and when another tenant gets a leak, all of the water is shut off for long periods of time. I can't wait to move into a new building.
Pre-war buildings do not necessarily have those issues, though.
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Old 07-21-2018, 03:17 PM
 
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Fourth, fifth or *sixth* (have never seen six story walk-up buildings, but then much depends upon if one is counting ground floor), are fine for the young and healthy. However for those >60 and certainly the advanced elderly those apartments can become a prison. This also applies to anyone who is very ill, becomes disabled, etc....


Speak with social workers, visiting nurses, home help aides, etc.... They all have stories to tell about people living on high floors of walk-up buildings. No small number of such persons themselves refuse and or don't want to take such assignments because they have own issues with climbing up all those stairs.


Even EMT and other emergency personnel aren't thrilled with walk-up buildings. Getting themselves up several flights of stairs (often with heavy gear) is bad enough. But think about having to get back down, often with same gear and or with dead weight (a patient) in a stretcher.


Often family, healthcare providers, social workers or even the person themselves recognize need to move into another apartment on lower level. However in a good number of cases we're talking about tenants of old RC or RS apartments who are paying well below market rate rents. They aren't likely to find another apartment for say $400/month. Nor are landlords often thrilled with the idea of giving up a vacant apartment on lower level (that they intend to renovate and get more money in rent) in exchange.


In some cases tenant groups, social services, and or the city will lean hard on LL to make the swap. If not then unless something can be found elsewhere, tenant will have to remain where they are until death or whatever.


Have know of several persons over years within our block who lived on upper floors of walk-up buildings that were moved into nursing homes. Good news is that RC laws mean long as their rent is paid and they plan on returning they can keep the apartment. Sadly none of them got that chance, as they died in said nursing homes.
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Old 07-21-2018, 03:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Fourth, fifth or *sixth* (have never seen six story walk-up buildings, but then much depends upon if one is counting ground floor), are fine for the young and healthy. However for those >60 and certainly the advanced elderly those apartments can become a prison. This also applies to anyone who is very ill, becomes disabled, etc....


Speak with social workers, visiting nurses, home help aides, etc.... They all have stories to tell about people living on high floors of walk-up buildings. No small number of such persons themselves refuse and or don't want to take such assignments because they have own issues with climbing up all those stairs.


Even EMT and other emergency personnel aren't thrilled with walk-up buildings. Getting themselves up several flights of stairs (often with heavy gear) is bad enough. But think about having to get back down, often with same gear and or with dead weight (a patient) in a stretcher.


Often family, healthcare providers, social workers or even the person themselves recognize need to move into another apartment on lower level. However in a good number of cases we're talking about tenants of old RC or RS apartments who are paying well below market rate rents. They aren't likely to find another apartment for say $400/month. Nor are landlords often thrilled with the idea of giving up a vacant apartment on lower level (that they intend to renovate and get more money in rent) in exchange.


In some cases tenant groups, social services, and or the city will lean hard on LL to make the swap. If not then unless something can be found elsewhere, tenant will have to remain where they are until death or whatever.


Have know of several persons over years within our block who lived on upper floors of walk-up buildings that were moved into nursing homes. Good news is that RC laws mean long as their rent is paid and they plan on returning they can keep the apartment. Sadly none of them got that chance, as they died in said nursing homes.
Is it even possible to retrofit those buildings with elevators? I'm guessing not.

I am counting the ground floor as long as it is occupied by apartments or businesses. I'm pretty sure I've even seen 7 floor walkups.
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:05 PM
 
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Is it even possible to retrofit those buildings with elevators? I'm guessing not.

I am counting the ground floor as long as it is occupied by apartments or businesses. I'm pretty sure I've even seen 7 floor walkups.

Yes, it is possible to retrofit elevators into older buildings.




331 East 81st Street is a recent example: https://streeteasy.com/building/331-...treet-new_York


https://streeteasy.com/building/331-...treet-new_york
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Yes, it is possible to retrofit elevators into older buildings.




331 East 81st Street is a recent example: https://streeteasy.com/building/331-...treet-new_York


https://streeteasy.com/building/331-...treet-new_york
That's interesting, considering there are only 2-3 apartments per floor.

What I'm curious about, is what percentage of those large midrise buildings in upper Manhattan and The Bronx have elevators.
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
That's interesting, considering there are only 2-3 apartments per floor.

What I'm curious about, is what percentage of those large midrise buildings in upper Manhattan and The Bronx have elevators.


There are only 2-3 apartments per floor *NOW*, but this building was an old walk-up tenement that was emptied out then gut renovated. You can see original details including C of O on the DOB webpage for this building.


Installing an elevator into old construction isn't that difficult. Long as prep work, suitability and so forth have been determined, it basically is cutting a hole in roof, creating a shaft way, installing whatever needs to be fitted, hoisting elevator (with crane) up and into said shaft, completing job/sealing off roof.


Whenever these old tenements/walk-up buildings on UES and elsewhere are gut renovated (there are plenty, and more coming), an elevator is most always installed. This ain't 1820 or even 1920; no one wants to be bothered climbing several flights of stairs. Least of all when paying three, four or more thousand per month in rent.


In fact one of the problems all these old walk-up buildings face is that they are facing a natural ceiling to rents.


Even with a gut renovation or whatever when people have choices of new buildings or totally gut renovated with an elevator versus paying same or even slightly less for some crappy ancient tenement, guess who wins?
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
There are only 2-3 apartments per floor *NOW*, but this building was an old walk-up tenement that was emptied out then gut renovated. You can see original details including C of O on the DOB webpage for this building.


Installing an elevator into old construction isn't that difficult. Long as prep work, suitability and so forth have been determined, it basically is cutting a hole in roof, creating a shaft way, installing whatever needs to be fitted, hoisting elevator (with crane) up and into said shaft, completing job/sealing off roof.


Whenever these old tenements/walk-up buildings on UES and elsewhere are gut renovated (there are plenty, and more coming), an elevator is most always installed. This ain't 1820 or even 1920; no one wants to be bothered climbing several flights of stairs. Least of all when paying three, four or more thousand per month in rent.
But where does the elevator shaft go? I'm guessing they have to take space from some of the apartments?

And somewhat related story, when I was 3 or 4 years old, I rolled down at least a flight of stairs from the fifth floor (I remember it being all 5 flights) at my aunt's building in Park Slope! Thankfully I wasn't hurt at all.

As for your last point, I think that's true but I do think most young people would be perfectly fine with a walkup building if they're on the 1st through 3rd floor.
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:29 PM
 
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One of the worst things about walkup buildings (even the 2 and 3 story ones) has to be moving in and out. Just imagine pulling a couch or piano up 6 flights of steps!
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