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Old 07-23-2018, 07:56 PM
 
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One of the last remaining middle class and ungentrified neighborhoods in Manhattan
Discuss!🙂
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Old 07-23-2018, 07:58 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Originally Posted by Shoshanarose View Post
One of the last remaining middle class and ungentrified neighborhoods in Manhattan
Discuss!🙂
What's there to discuss? The Upper East Side is mainly upper class and wealthy. It also has a large historical district which residents fight vehemently to keep. The Upper East Side is expensive west of Lexington. Perhaps you are thinking about Yorkville? The UES is "old money".
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:01 PM
 
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UES middle class and not gentrified? It's known for being a wealthy area.

I don't think ungentrified is a good word to describe it. It looks to me like a neighborhood that's already fully gentrified
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:04 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
UES middle class and not gentrified? It's known for being a wealthy area.

I don't think ungentrified is a good word to describe it. It looks to me like a neighborhood that's already fully gentrified
There is nothing to gentrify because the UES has always been an upper class area. I think she needs to get her definitions straight of what is middle class. The median income for the area is over $130,000.
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
There is nothing to gentrify because the UES has always been an upper class area. I think she needs to get her definitions straight of what is middle class. The median income for the area is over $130,000.
That's what I meant, it was never a poor neighborhood (at least not within any of our lifetimes) so there's nothing to gentrify. It's already in the state of a fully gentrified neighborhood.

And 130k is high, but also includes the old timers with lower rents, and people living in NYCHA. I wonder what the median income is of people who are signing new leases.
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:31 PM
 
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Was the UES east of Lexington and north of 72nd wealthy in the 80s/90s or is that a recent development? I’ve seen pics of 2nd and 1st Avenues in the mid 80s and they look a lot grittier than I expected. Was also told there were a lot of Puerto Ricans especially as you got closer to 96th and the start of East Harlem
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:33 PM
 
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East of Lexington it tends not to be too expensive
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Old 07-24-2018, 01:57 AM
 
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Leave us clear up a few things.


First, as with other areas of Manhattan, the UES covers a wide geographic area; but things vary on ground.


The rich heartland of UES has always been Lexington Avenue going west to Fifth. Some more charitable will include Third Avenue making it the dividing line with all points west as UES.


Third Avenue is important because the EL was both a visual and defining marker. No one with money or whatever lived under or near an elevated railway, so while the blocks between Third and Lexington back in the day did have some well off households, not all were socially acceptable. You had people who made their money in trade and other enterprises that the wealthy further east felt were beneath themselves.


Third to Lexington also were where the wealthy from points east stabled their horses. Later as automobiles took over you had both private and public garages, many of both are still standing. Those old carriage houses have long been turned into residences and go for big money.


East of Third Avenue, especially above 80th street is *Yorkville* an area most certainly not "rich" or "wealthy". But a mixture of Irish, German, Hungarian, Jewish, and other European immigrant and or descent households.


Yorkville then and until rather recently reflected a gamut from poverty through working, middle and even wealthy households. Things often varied block by block.


From about the 70th street through much of the 80's Yorkville was known as "Secretaries Row". This was because the area back in the day offered reasonable housing for single women (secretaries, nurses, etc...).


The many hospitals located in area (Lenox Hill, Flower and Fifth (closed), New York Hospital, Sloane-Kettering, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Bellevue Hospital North (closed), meant then and still today Yorkville is still home to many nurses who are/were drawn because of relatively inexpensive housing.


For much of the 1970's through really 1990's you could still find "affordable" apartments in Yorkville. Especially further east one went past Second Avenue.


Historically Yorkville had gay bars, was infested with trannie hookers, female hookers (there was a stroll around 85th street where the USPS office is now (once was a firehouse). In fact that line from musical number "42nd Street" about "shady ladies from the 80's who are indiscrete", alludes to that fact.


Poverty? Yes, and have spoken about this before. Those middle aged to old people you see digging through supermarket and other rubbish bags *live in the Yorkville area*. All those walk-up and tenement buildings are full of people >50 or even >70 who have lived in Yorkville most if not all their lives.
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Old 07-24-2018, 01:59 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Leave us clear up a few things.


First, as with other areas of Manhattan, the UES covers a wide geographic area; but things vary on ground.


The rich heartland of UES has always been Lexington Avenue going west to Fifth. Some more charitable will include Third Avenue making it the dividing line with all points west as UES.


Third Avenue is important because the EL was both a visual and defining marker. No one with money or whatever lived under or near an elevated railway, so while the blocks between Third and Lexington back in the day did have some well off households, not all were socially acceptable. You had people who made their money in trade and other enterprises that the wealthy further east felt were beneath themselves.


Third to Lexington also were where the wealthy from points east stabled their horses. Later as automobiles took over you had both private and public garages, many of both are still standing. Those old carriage houses have long been turned into residences and go for big money.


East of Third Avenue, especially above 80th street is *Yorkville* an area most certainly not "rich" or "wealthy". But a mixture of Irish, German, Hungarian, Jewish, and other European immigrant and or descent households.


Yorkville then and until rather recently reflected a gamut from poverty through working, middle and even wealthy households. Things often varied block by block.


From about the 70th street through much of the 80's Yorkville was known as "Secretaries Row". This was because the area back in the day offered reasonable housing for single women (secretaries, nurses, etc...).


The many hospitals located in area (Lenox Hill, Flower and Fifth (closed), New York Hospital, Sloane-Kettering, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Bellevue Hospital North (closed), meant then and still today Yorkville is still home to many nurses who are/were drawn because of relatively inexpensive housing.


For much of the 1970's through really 1990's you could still find "affordable" apartments in Yorkville. Especially further east one went past Second Avenue.


Historically Yorkville had gay bars, was infested with trannie hookers, female hookers (there was a stroll around 85th street where the USPS office is now (once was a firehouse). In fact that line from musical number "42nd Street" about "shady ladies from the 80's who are indiscrete", alludes to that fact.


Poverty? Yes, and have spoken about this before. Those middle aged to old people you see digging through supermarket and other rubbish bags *live in the Yorkville area*. All those walk-up and tenement buildings are full of people >50 or even >70 who have lived in Yorkville most if not all their lives.
Now how about people who are moving to Yorkville now? Or have been moving there over the last ten years
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Old 07-24-2018, 02:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Now how about people who are moving to Yorkville now? Or have been moving there over the last ten years
Families, lots of families.


You can't get away from kids, strollers, moms to be, dads, etc....


Places like Pinkberry on Second are mobbed with parents and kids (or just kids after school or hanging out).


What once was single person/recent college grad haven; is now fast becoming like Greenwich or some suburban place.


Landlords are throwing tenants out of buildings and or otherwise converting studio and one bedroom apartments into the now highly sought two and three bedrooms.


https://streeteasy.com/building/245-...treet-new_York


And more are coming: https://ny.curbed.com/maps/upper-eas...uction-map-nyc




https://patch.com/new-york/upper-eas...pper-east-side


The Upper East Side Is Making Up for Lost Time With These Luxurious New Developments | | Observer


From four years ago regarding UES/Yorkville rents: The Upper East Side, of all places, attracts bargain hunters * - NY Daily News


However overall downtown Manhattan (about 34th Street going south to Financial District) on both east and west side are still commanding slightly higher rental and sale prices than UES on average.


Manhattan Rental Market Report | MNS is Real Impact Real Estate
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