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Old 02-25-2019, 06:14 PM
 
1,244 posts, read 333,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
I guess it's a question of scale. It looks like Philly is about 12% while NYC is 27% Latino. More than 2x more as a percent of the population here.
That's only 15 percentage points. There are many places in NYC without many Latinos too
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Old 02-25-2019, 06:34 PM
 
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If you make enough money then anywhere would be just the same. If you don’t, there are plenty of differences, such as food you eat, transportation you take, house you live in (or become homeless), desperate for the next high paying job and never land one, etc......
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Old 02-25-2019, 10:53 PM
 
125 posts, read 39,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alinasf30 View Post
New York is a huge world class city but I'm struggling to really find the differences between life in Philly and NYC. I'm moving to Manhattan from center city Philadelphia and people say NYC is a lot quicker paced and cut throat, but I'm struggling to find a huge difference in the way life is conducted here vs. there.
Things that surprised me included how nice the people are, how the "fast paced" attitude doesn't seem to exist, and how WIDE the streets are (and how big everything is!)
In Philly, strangers don't talk to you while you're checking out at the cash register or at a bank or anywhere. No excuse me's, no thanks, no greetings. This was a refreshing change in NYC

Wow that's nice to hear --- it's nice to get an outsiders perspective.


Should I expect a huge difference in terms of the people there, food, culture, or is it pretty much the same?


I always hear Philly is rough --- but man --- 2018 homicide rate in the city of Philadelphia was close to 12 times the rate for Manhattan/ New York county.


That's rough. That's a huge cultural difference.


Do you find yourself traveling far to get daily essentials? How often do you leave your neighborhood? Is it easy and convenient taking the train or is it just something people deal with to get where they want to go? Would living in a neighborhood with lots of things to do like SoHo be enough to provide me with entertainment without going too far?
A 15 minute walk from Broadway and Grand will have enough entertainment for most folks.

Last edited by McVinney; 02-25-2019 at 11:04 PM..
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Old 02-25-2019, 11:02 PM
 
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I enjoy Philly.

I don't think they're that different.

Philly is smaller. It might not be as crowded but some of the streets are much smaller/narrower.

As for cheesesteaks, I love me some Cleavers.
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Old 02-26-2019, 12:47 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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NYC used to not be very friendly either but because it has seen a larger influx of transplants from other parts of the country (as well as an exodus of hard core native NY'ers) than Philly has in the past couple of decades, it has taken on a different persona.

Greeting strangers, saying thank you's, excuse me's, letting people go in front of you and holding the door for others, etc. used to be nonexistent in this city.

That's why NYC had a reputation for being rude and tough that is no longer the case because visitors from elsewhere saw this as being rude.

You can say the attitude you experience in Philly right now is what NYC used to be...say...back in the early 1990's.
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Old 02-26-2019, 12:54 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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In fact, you will find many of the true NY'er attitude in places like Florida than you would in NYC now.
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Old 02-26-2019, 01:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
NYC used to not be very friendly either but because it has seen a larger influx of transplants from other parts of the country (as well as an exodus of hard core native NY'ers) than Philly has in the past couple of decades, it has taken on a different persona.

Greeting strangers, saying thank you's, excuse me's, letting people go in front of you and holding the door for others, etc. used to be nonexistent in this city.

That's why NYC had a reputation for being rude and tough that is no longer the case because visitors from elsewhere saw this as being rude.

You can say the attitude you experience in Philly right now is what NYC used to be...say...back in the early 1990's.
People in Philly are pretty nice though. I never encountered any rudeness when I was there
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Old 02-26-2019, 05:35 AM
 
661 posts, read 287,241 times
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As a native NYer I don’t think NY has anything that Philly doesn’t. I looooove Philly. This was not true maybe 30 years ago but now NY and Philly seem similar with Philly being a “mini” NYC-type place.
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Old 02-26-2019, 07:02 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
5,107 posts, read 2,653,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
People in Philly are pretty nice though. I never encountered any rudeness when I was there
I did not say Philly was rude. I said that not being polite is considered rude by people in other parts of the country, hence NY'er got that reputation in the past. People on this site have reading comprehension issues and so we'll have to do a back and forth on this too.
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Old 02-26-2019, 08:26 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
I've been here a year and moved from University City Philadelphia so let me break this down for you:





Surprisingly not much. NYers tend to think everything outside NY (except maybe LA) midas well be a one stop light town. The reality is that if you've lived in Boston, DC, Philly or Chicago you're not that far off from experiencing what the NY vibe is like. NY isn't a super intense sensory experience the same way like a Tokyo is. It's far more chill than people will have you believe.




That's the thing, NY isn't so much different from other American cities as it's simply *bigger*. NY and Philly have all the same things except whatever Philly has NY will have like 8 of them LOL.



The only thing is I've heard dating is a horror show.


I completely understand now. I guess Philly is enough of a city to show me what the big city is like.

Also, how is dating that bad in such a big city? I'm a single 22 year old woman so I'm curious... my only companion is my lovely dog
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