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Old 02-26-2019, 03:34 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 330,521 times
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One real difference to me is that NYC has much more of a late night vibe.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
I feel like there's a lot more NYC restaurants that can slack off due to having more tourists and temporary residents that don't know any better and don't look at Yelp. In Philly it's harder to survive because word gets around quicker that your restaurant sucks
They don't call it the Restaurant City for nothing!!
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Old 03-20-2019, 09:33 AM
Status: "Digging Up Acorns" (set 8 days ago)
 
296 posts, read 37,702 times
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The main differences I can detect between NYC and Philly are that NYC doesn't have tight boxed in streets like Philly and the stuck together houses are wider. There are way fewer broken, boarded up or hollow houses than in Philly and more people live in apartment buildings than the narrow stuck together houses. Stuck together houses in NYC are wider and have white wood on the sides.

There are also more stores. NYC's streets are wide and flat. The train cars are way wider than Philly as well. The MFL Seats have cotton and are horizontal, like NYC bus. NYC subway cars are flat against the sides of the train and hard plastic because people spill liquids a lot.

In Philly, a bodega is every 3 or 4 blocks, here they're every 2 blocks. Check Cashing and a restaurant is every 3 or 4 blocks. In Philly it would be every 10 blocks.

The train rides are also way longer because the city is characteristically wide and flat, with slow trains and busses. If I lived in Hunting Park, Olney or Harrowgate (Typical residential areas) and worked in Center City it would take much less time to get there than any residential area like the Bronx, to Midtown Manhattan.

Philly is physically the size of the Bronx. Here in NYC it's even worse if you live in Mt Vernon, Queens or south Staten Island. Most New Yorkers take a bus to the train.
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Old 03-20-2019, 09:45 AM
 
860 posts, read 229,687 times
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Most everybody around the world have heard of New York. We are more famous and more loved more than you.

Now empty your pockets, and give it to the illegals.
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Old 03-20-2019, 11:21 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 330,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
The main differences I can detect between NYC and Philly are that NYC doesn't have tight boxed in streets like Philly and the stuck together houses are wider. There are way fewer broken, boarded up or hollow houses than in Philly and more people live in apartment buildings than the narrow stuck together houses. Stuck together houses in NYC are wider and have white wood on the sides.

There are also more stores. NYC's streets are wide and flat. The train cars are way wider than Philly as well. The MFL Seats have cotton and are horizontal, like NYC bus. NYC subway cars are flat against the sides of the train and hard plastic because people spill liquids a lot.

In Philly, a bodega is every 3 or 4 blocks, here they're every 2 blocks. Check Cashing and a restaurant is every 3 or 4 blocks. In Philly it would be every 10 blocks.

The train rides are also way longer because the city is characteristically wide and flat, with slow trains and busses. If I lived in Hunting Park, Olney or Harrowgate (Typical residential areas) and worked in Center City it would take much less time to get there than any residential area like the Bronx, to Midtown Manhattan.

Philly is physically the size of the Bronx. Here in NYC it's even worse if you live in Mt Vernon, Queens or south Staten Island. Most New Yorkers take a bus to the train.
What white wood are you referring to? NYC also has a lot of brick/stone attached houses like Philly, probably more so than wood ones
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post

In Philly, a bodega is every 3 or 4 blocks, here they're every 2 blocks. Check Cashing and a restaurant is every 3 or 4 blocks. In Philly it would be every 10 blocks.
Not really. There are bodegas, or corner stores as we call them here, basically on every block or every other here too. In my neighborhood in South Philly, there are 8 within a 2 block radius. A few owned by Latinos, the Indonesian one, a few by the Vietnamese, and the one by the old Italian guy. There are almost just as many little restuarants/take outs as well.
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:24 AM
Status: "Digging Up Acorns" (set 8 days ago)
 
296 posts, read 37,702 times
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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
What white wood are you referring to? NYC also has a lot of brick/stone attached houses like Philly, probably more so than wood ones
I am talking about this kind of normal house that is everywhere. This is in Soundview but it could also be in East Flatbush, anywhere in Queens like Elmhurst or Jamaica, or Staten Island.



Compared to Fairhill Philadelphia which is a regular residential area that is very similar.

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Old 03-21-2019, 08:28 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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That's called vinyl siding. It is not very common in NYC except for neighborhoods like Greenpoint and Williamsburg. Don't ask me why those two.
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:42 AM
Status: "Digging Up Acorns" (set 8 days ago)
 
296 posts, read 37,702 times
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
That's called vinyl siding. It is not very common in NYC except for neighborhoods like Greenpoint and Williamsburg. Don't ask me why those two.
I've seen it everywhere residential in NYC though. Especially Staten Island, East Bronx, and Queens. The super narrow homes characteristic of Philadelphia are quite rare here.

Here is a more upscale house that has vinyl siding too.

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Old 03-21-2019, 12:26 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 330,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I am talking about this kind of normal house that is everywhere. This is in Soundview but it could also be in East Flatbush, anywhere in Queens like Elmhurst or Jamaica, or Staten Island.



Compared to Fairhill Philadelphia which is a regular residential area that is very similar.

NYC's attached houses are more likely to not have vinyl siding (except in Queens and SI maybe)
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