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Old 07-20-2019, 07:07 AM
 
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There are some housing units requiring section 8 for low income senior, typically requiring at least one household member who is 62 years of age or older and meet income requirement.

My question is: if seniors(married couple: 66 yrs old & 63 yrs old) do not have section 8 but are absolutely qualified for section 8 (Only income source: Social Security retirement and Supplemental Security Income), in this case, are they qualified for applying such housing?

I mean: do they need to have Section 8 first before applying for housing lottery, or they will automatically get section 8 if they are selected for the housing lottery.

Thanks.
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Old 07-20-2019, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
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Baike,


Give us a link to such an offer.
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Old 07-20-2019, 10:13 PM
 
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Automatic section 8 doesn’t exist to my knowledge.
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Old Yesterday, 05:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxyknoxy View Post
Automatic section 8 doesn’t exist to my knowledge.
Really??? Maybe I am wrong, kinda confused about the whole public housing system. Maybe different states work differently, I am not in NYC, but my parents are in NYC, all my posts are actually on the behalf of my parents (low income senior).

Here is the information I found on wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_8_(housing)

Actually, I was talking about "project-based" section 8, this is typically offered in NYC housing lottery program. When a building is developed/managed by third party and the housing units are offered to low income family. As long a low income family is accepted into the building, then the family will automatically qualified for section 8. If the family moves out of the building, the family cannot bring the section with them, since it is project based section 8, so the section stays with the building for the next move-in low income family. The section 8 works behind the scene, low income family may NOT need to apply for section 8 directly, but there is section 8 money moved from government to third party. Otherwise, how can the third party manages the building?

While tenant-based section 8 is typically for private resident landlord, low income family can bring section 8 to any private landlord as long as the private resident landlord. In many places, I don't think NYC is still accepting new applications anymore: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/nycha/sect...pplicants.page

In many states, if people is already receiving tenant-based section 8, then that people is unlikely accepted into project based section 8(public housing), since resource is limited and there are many people are still on the wait-list. That is why some people does not want to apply for tenant-based section and rather wait for public housing.

There are also public housing buildings directly managed by government, I don't want to go into too much details, but in general, I believe there is also section 8 behind the scene. To my understanding, section 8 is more about federal money, for local government public building, it is also kinda building based section 8, as long as low income family moves into the building, the section 8 money is transferred from federal government to local government. For example(the numbers are just made up), if a low income family move into the government directly managed money, based on income, the family only need to pay $300 for the rent and federal government offers additional $700 to local government in order for the local government to maintain/manage the building. If the family moves out of the building, the next low income family moves into the place, based on the next family's income, the family only needs to pay $200 rent, then federal government will offer $800 to local government.

Government directly managed housing building is a more traditional way to offer housing assistance. But I think government is low efficient, and there are more people looking for housing assistance. Then the government turns to private market for additional housing: asking the third party to develop building; asking private landlords to offer additional rooms.

The whole housing assistance program's funding source is more relied on federal government(local government may also have funded some money), then managed by local government. It is just like medicaid program, eventually, money mainly comes from federal government. A lot of welfare programs' funding source mainly come from federal government.

To sum up into three categories:
1) Government directly managed building for low income families: not sure how funding source works, but I think the section 8 also works behind the scene, let me also call it project based section 8 (based on Wikipedia definition). Money moves from federal government to local government. It is also meaningless to talk about this category.

2) Third party developed/managed building for low income families: since third party is not charity, there is also no donation source for such buildings. So there must be some money moving from government to third party. Let me also call it project based section 8. It is also something working behind the scene.

3) Private landlord offered room for low income family: tenant based section 8, money transferred from government to private landlord.

Please correct me if I am wrong.
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Old Yesterday, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
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Here's my knowledge of "project based Section " by example.


THe entire site of the old Ruppert Brewery (UES East 90's) was redeveloped into parks and Mitchell-Lama housing in the mid 1970's. Three of the buildings were RENTAL ML's and one was a COOP (Ruppert House, my home) After 25 years the 3 rentals were taken private by the landlord and two were converted to expensive condominiums, Yorkville Tower and Ruppert Tower. The third , Knickerbocker, was kept a rental but rents were skyrocketed BUT those living there were given "project based Section 8" to allow those in residence to remain while the City/State? took over the bulk of the difference between their old rent and market rent.
I do not know what happened to the old residents of the two condominium conversions, maybe they remained as rent controlled tenants? Maybe they got the "project based Section 8" too. Maybe they were given an attractive buy in price?


And that is the sum total of my knowledge on the subject.
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Old Yesterday, 03:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
Here's my knowledge of "project based Section " by example.


THe entire site of the old Ruppert Brewery (UES East 90's) was redeveloped into parks and Mitchell-Lama housing in the mid 1970's. Three of the buildings were RENTAL ML's and one was a COOP (Ruppert House, my home) After 25 years the 3 rentals were taken private by the landlord and two were converted to expensive condominiums, Yorkville Tower and Ruppert Tower. The third , Knickerbocker, was kept a rental but rents were skyrocketed BUT those living there were given "project based Section 8" to allow those in residence to remain while the City/State? took over the bulk of the difference between their old rent and market rent.
I do not know what happened to the old residents of the two condominium conversions, maybe they remained as rent controlled tenants? Maybe they got the "project based Section 8" too. Maybe they were given an attractive buy in price?


And that is the sum total of my knowledge on the subject.
When Knickerbocker Plaza withdrew from ML low income and or other tenants were eligible for vouchers or similar aid that kept their rents to no more than 30% total household income. That however wasn't exactly the gift many believed as due to budget cuts KP tenants receiving such aid were subject to "right sizing" of apartments just as with NYCHA.


https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york...enants-smaller

http://www.ipnta.org/press_10-29/Mit...g_Profiles.pdf

https://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/26/n...ty/26knic.html

https://medium.com/@aliMcpherson96/t...a-3b08b037ad0f

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitche...lt_before_1974


When Ruppert Towers, KP and other ML buildings began leaving that scheme it caught elected officials, tenants and others unawares. I don't know why because terms were clearly spelled out when and how this could occur when ML was created. Subsequent to RT and the others there was activity that sought to soften the blow of privatization or stop it all together.

State/city "decided" that ML rental apartments before 1974 would fall under RS laws. That took some of the incentive for owners to privatized those ML buildings, and if it wasn't enough the new RS laws certainly will.
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Old Today, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
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Bugsy,


Do you know what happened to the in-residence tenants of the Yorkville and Ruppert Towers when they went from ML rental to market condominium?


Did they enter rent stabilization while remaining in place? I presume some of them might have been forced to downsize?


I presume their apartments were sold to "investors" like Mathjak
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