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Old 07-21-2019, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,668 posts, read 34,768,293 times
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https://nypost.com/2019/07/20/how-re...chas-problems/
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Old 07-21-2019, 12:21 PM
 
2,858 posts, read 3,776,823 times
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While I agree with the overall premise from a design standpoint, as an urbanist, the majority of NYCHA's social problems are a result of concentrated poverty. My mom grew up in the Ravenswood Houses and until the 80s it was a soild mix of incomes, races and backgrounds, and was a great place to grow up. Once the city decided NYCHA would serve as housing of last resort, that's when what we see today began to manifest.

Towers-in-a-park don't "cause" crime. Note how the projects in Chelsea, UWS, Boreum Hill (BK), and other areas aren't the criminal hotspots places like Millbrook, Carver or Pink houses are. What's the connection? The former are in wealthy to upper middle class neighborhoods where people living/growing up there are exposed to different lifestyles and ways of thinking in their day to day life. Concentrate poverty and you get people who know nothing other than the hood way of doing things. BTW, before someone says it, growing up in PA you see the same thing with blonde hair blue eyed people in trailer parks knowing nothing other than meth, gun running and negative lifestyles.

Plenty of traditional urban blocks that have social problems galore. See: West Bronx, Parts of Wash Hts, ENY. The connection: Concentrated poverty.
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Old 07-21-2019, 04:42 PM
 
751 posts, read 377,462 times
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Ding ding ding.

Concentrated poverty leads to more poverty and violence.
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Old 07-21-2019, 05:06 PM
 
20,877 posts, read 13,839,079 times
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Thing is back when many NYCHA projects first went up they were solid working to middle class housing. Even those that were mostly AAs weren't the hell holes they became over time. OTOH even most or many of the nicer places have been dragged down by same forces (largely thanks to policies of NYC), that turned others into cesspools of crime, violence and whatever else.
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Old 07-21-2019, 07:25 PM
 
6,283 posts, read 6,402,376 times
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The projects are not that far from the rest of the communities. The garden spaces are not that huge on all the projects.

Take the Bland Houses in Flushing. Its right next to Skyview, and Roosevelt ave. Yet, all the businesses are still all chinese and do not cater to the residents of the project.

The ones in Morningside Heights on Amsterdam Ave can still get out and about. Same for the Chelsea projects, and the ones in Chinatown by the FDR.
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Old Yesterday, 09:56 AM
 
1,241 posts, read 1,498,256 times
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Yeah not having connected streets is NYCHA's problem. LOL
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Old Yesterday, 10:12 AM
 
1,432 posts, read 1,799,368 times
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" Towers in a park" was once the cutting edge of Urban Design. It was supposed to be integrating nature with urban life, leading to greater health & happiness.
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Old Yesterday, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Harlem, NY
4,602 posts, read 4,050,772 times
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no. just raze the projects. give the residents a package to transfer to selected developments, don't bunch em all in one place. in fact... scatter em
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Old Yesterday, 11:55 AM
 
618 posts, read 217,711 times
Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
While I agree with the overall premise from a design standpoint, as an urbanist, the majority of NYCHA's social problems are a result of concentrated poverty. My mom grew up in the Ravenswood Houses and until the 80s it was a soild mix of incomes, races and backgrounds, and was a great place to grow up. Once the city decided NYCHA would serve as housing of last resort, that's when what we see today began to manifest.

Towers-in-a-park don't "cause" crime. Note how the projects in Chelsea, UWS, Boreum Hill (BK), and other areas aren't the criminal hotspots places like Millbrook, Carver or Pink houses are. What's the connection? The former are in wealthy to upper middle class neighborhoods where people living/growing up there are exposed to different lifestyles and ways of thinking in their day to day life. Concentrate poverty and you get people who know nothing other than the hood way of doing things. BTW, before someone says it, growing up in PA you see the same thing with blonde hair blue eyed people in trailer parks knowing nothing other than meth, gun running and negative lifestyles.

Plenty of traditional urban blocks that have social problems galore. See: West Bronx, Parts of Wash Hts, ENY. The connection: Concentrated poverty.
This!!

When people are constantly exposed to poverty and crime they end up repeating the cycle. I grew up in the Projects but thankfully my mindset was not making my 9-5 siting in front of a project building while life passed me by. It resulted in venturing out of the area to experience things outside of the projects. No matter where someone goes there is always that pocket of poverty the constantly repeat the cycle generation after generation.

Adding 2 streets will not solve whats going on in that neighborhood.
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Old Yesterday, 11:57 AM
 
1,921 posts, read 561,161 times
Reputation: 1296
Quote:
Originally Posted by HellUpInHarlem View Post
no. just raze the projects. give the residents a package to transfer to selected developments, don't bunch em all in one place. in fact... scatter em
I doubt there is space to house 400k people as is
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