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Old 07-22-2019, 05:11 PM
 
145 posts, read 50,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Watched Dom DeLuise in "Fatso" the other day which was set in the Village and partially shot on location (195 Spring St, and 172 Prince Street). People forget or don't realize just how much of West and Greenwich Village was Italian back in the day, and not just "Little Italy" either.

Bit more trivia; Anne Bancroft, one of the stars of film "Fatso" was full blooded Italian from the Bronx! Her birth name was Anna Maria Louisa (or Luisa?) Italiano. Later in life she would buy and live in a brownstone on West 11th street in the Village.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xm0vgAnHQzQ
She also graduated from Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx back in 1948.
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Old 07-22-2019, 05:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosenza View Post
She also graduated from Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx back in 1948.
Gave reps!
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Old 07-22-2019, 06:41 PM
 
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The sicilian dialects pronounce the c like g in many cases, so manigot, gabigol, rigotta; but not all cases so it's still calzone.
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:35 PM
 
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It's the Italian version of ebonics.
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:53 PM
 
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Little kid in that video needs to be sent a muffin basket or something.

He's like "this stunad from America trying to speak Italian"......
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:18 AM
 
Location: NY
4,003 posts, read 1,029,961 times
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I found that first generation children of immigrant parents will pronounce words correctly as compared to second or third generations.
It seems the longer Italians or any other culture for that matter take up permanence in the United States the more watered down the
words of their ancestry become.
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:20 AM
 
Location: NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
The sicilian dialects pronounce the c like g in many cases, so manigot, gabigol, rigotta; but not all cases so it's still calzone.
Be glad you are not Finnish pronouncing your B's for P's.
Just image going into the grocery store and asking for a Bear instead of a Pear........................LOL.....
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:43 AM
 
774 posts, read 389,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Retired View Post
I found that first generation children of immigrant parents will pronounce words correctly as compared to second or third generations.
It seems the longer Italians or any other culture for that matter take up permanence in the United States the more watered down the
words of their ancestry become.
It's not a matter of correctness vs. incorrectness though. It's not incorrect to pronounce Italian in a regional accent.

As a (native) Italian speaker, I can assure you that there is a reason why the "manigoat" pronunciation and similar exist. Most Italian Americans come from Southern Italian stock. Many Southern Italian regions, in these cases most likely Naples and Sicily, have quirks in local pronunciation which have led to Americans of Neapolitan and Sicilian origin to carry these pronunciations over and pass them down as if they were standard Italian.

In Naples the ending of many words is truncated so you will indeed actually hear manicott'. In Sicily, as someone mentioned here, many people pronounce C as G and P and B. Additionally, the letter U is in place of the letter O in many words, like the standard Italian "mozzarella" becoming "muzzarella" in Sicilian and similar.

If you go to Naples today you will indeed hear people say mozzarell' and manicott' just like in the US.

These pronunciations have become comically exaggerated over time here in America but they have a real historic meaning.
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:47 AM
 
774 posts, read 389,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Does anyone in Italy still speak like that?
Yes. And if you speak Italian well enough you can hear it in BugsyPal's post where he links a Soprano's scene. Lots of truncation of final vowels and schwas at the end of words. Neapolitans today still speak like this.
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:04 AM
 
198 posts, read 44,655 times
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The Village had a lot of Neopolitan Italians, they pronounce Neopolitan as Nob-le-don or Naples as Nob-la.
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