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Old 07-26-2019, 09:16 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 638,458 times
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of course. but we are talking about the regular type of housing for average folks. 20
years ago, maybe it is true that people with means want to live in suburbs, but not today. housing prices in suburbs stagnate for many years, while queens and brooklyn property values soar

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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
NJ and especially LI have expensive houses too, it depends on the neighborhood
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Old 07-26-2019, 10:39 AM
 
1,976 posts, read 592,601 times
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
i think the chinese restuarants in manhattan are stupid too.
Why? There is an increasing amount of really good ones
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Old 07-26-2019, 10:42 AM
 
1,199 posts, read 983,189 times
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Originally Posted by riact View Post
we're a country that accepts immigrants from around the world (unlike China), and then are pummeled mercilessly because we're not "woke" enough.

Unlike most of the world. Japan is as restrictive as China. Israel is restricted to Jews. Even Mexico is far more restrictive than the U.S.

Most of the world has ethnically and religiously restrictive immigration policies. It's only the white nations (can we call them that?) -- the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe that are called "racist" if they refuse to diversity.

At least Eastern European nations, to their credit, don't care about being called "racist." They look out for their own peoples. Communism has toughened them up.
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Old 07-26-2019, 11:41 AM
 
1,976 posts, read 592,601 times
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Originally Posted by Cinema Cat View Post
Unlike most of the world. Japan is as restrictive as China. Israel is restricted to Jews. Even Mexico is far more restrictive than the U.S.

Most of the world has ethnically and religiously restrictive immigration policies. It's only the white nations (can we call them that?) -- the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe that are called "racist" if they refuse to diversity.

At least Eastern European nations, to their credit, don't care about being called "racist." They look out for their own peoples. Communism has toughened them up.
Many Latin American countries do actually have open borders, but there is less incentive to immigrate them so they don't get flooded.
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:20 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,379 posts, read 23,868,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
Manhattan restaurants are stupid, because they suck and they are overpriced. has nothing to do with which cuisine they serve. They are stupid especially when they are considered as amenities to justify the ridiculous housing price in Manahttan
That's pretty odd for a few reasons. One is that you keep on going on about the cost of Flushing as some mark of exclusivity and therefore makes Flushing better and yet at a certain point these generally higher, though not that much higher for similar things, expenses of Manhattan restaurants are now somehow a sign that they are stupid and overpriced rather than a special mark of exclusivity.

Overpriced is odd, because while it will be more expensive than similar ones in Flushing, there are several factors like being able to meet up with people who are not from the neighborhood or being closer to more well-paying jobs for the after work set, or for before / after attending large cultural and performing arts events that are often in Manhattan. You pay a premium for that, but in a lot of ways you're saving either time or money for transport which can be well worth it. It might be stupid for the particular instance someone to not have considered any of this. Now, this might not make much sense to you if you don't actually meet up with people who do not live in Flushing or meet up with people very much at all, but that doesn't make the whole thing stupid.

One interesting thing is that in some cases, close to the same restaurants as several solid Flushing stalwarts as well as imports from China have opened up branches in Manhattan and now without pulling the punches since there's a massive Chinese tourists, students, and business person contingent in parts of Manhattan).

Also, you're forgetting that there's a pretty wide diversity and a much higher density of restaurants in Manhattan. That by itself is valuable to some.

Does this help put some perspective on things for you or are you still kind of lost?
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:53 AM
 
783 posts, read 395,045 times
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Gen2010 is very much so lost. His posts in this thread are all over the place.

Downtown Flushing is overcrowded, dirty, and has services that mostly cater to Asian people. There's nothing wrong with that in and of itself, but that means that mostly Asians move there. This is not a controversial statement.

The "spillage" of Asian developments has started to creep into other areas of Flushing as well, not just downtown. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Asian people moving into a neighborhood. But Chinese-backed development leads to the problems that downtown Flushing is facing, namely overcrowding, dirtiness, services catering mostly to Asians that alienate other people, etc. It also has raised the prices for starter homes in my neighborhood which 10 years ago were going for pretty much pennies on the dollar. Lots of baby boomers who inherited homes here or purchased them decades ago are selling for 1 million plus a pop, leaving millennials like myself and my friends completely unable to purchase homes in the neighborhoods in which we were raised as we're competing against Chinese money. The only people enriched by this development are the boomers selling the homes they bought for next to nothing or inherited and the ones redeveloping multi-families on ex-single family lots.

I don't understand why gen2010 doesn't understand this. Asian people and Asian development are two separate animals. I have nothing against Asian people whatsoever. One can dislike the development without disliking Asians, a point which is lost on gen2010... and that's truly all I have to say on the subject.

Last edited by shadypinesma; 07-28-2019 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:30 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 638,458 times
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your statement is really confusing. asian people vs asian development? what the hell you are atalking about? you are against chinese money, so you are against those immigrants with more money than you do? or you are against Chinese developers? most flushing developers are actually chinese americans. most of the big developer from china are more active in Manhattan, if you do a little research

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadypinesma View Post
Gen2010 is very much so lost. His posts in this thread are all over the place.

Downtown Flushing is overcrowded, dirty, and has services that mostly cater to Asian people. There's nothing wrong with that in and of itself, but that means that mostly Asians move there. This is not a controversial statement.

The "spillage" of Asian developments has started to creep into other areas of Flushing as well, not just downtown. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Asian people moving into a neighborhood. But Chinese-backed development leads to the problems that downtown Flushing is facing, namely overcrowding, dirtiness, services catering mostly to Asians that alienate other people, etc. It also has raised the prices for starter homes in my neighborhood which 10 years ago were going for pretty much pennies on the dollar. Lots of baby boomers who inherited homes here or purchased them decades ago are selling for 1 million plus a pop, leaving millennials like myself and my friends completely unable to purchase homes in the neighborhoods in which we were raised as we're competing against Chinese money. The only people enriched by this development are the boomers selling the homes they bought for next to nothing or inherited and the ones redeveloping multi-families on ex-single family lots.

I don't understand why gen2010 doesn't understand this. Asian people and Asian development are two separate animals. I have nothing against Asian people whatsoever. One can dislike the development without disliking Asians, a point which is lost on gen2010... and that's truly all I have to say on the subject.
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Old 08-02-2019, 08:01 AM
 
Location: NYC
13,100 posts, read 8,873,758 times
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Flushing's problem is that it's been overpriced since the 90s because of Asian community's desire to be near everything Asian. It's not the best area in terms of convenience, it's far from Manhattan, traffic is horrible, roads are bad, and very poor mass transit with just 7 train and buses. Try living there when the 7 train is down. It's ok for Asians because many of them work there so they just need the bus.

I fear that Flushing will become a mini Beijing and the roads around town isn't setup for high population density. The sidewalks are narrow and it's crazy to wait for bus on main street during busy rush hour on a busy day.
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Old 08-02-2019, 09:44 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,379 posts, read 23,868,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Flushing's problem is that it's been overpriced since the 90s because of Asian community's desire to be near everything Asian. It's not the best area in terms of convenience, it's far from Manhattan, traffic is horrible, roads are bad, and very poor mass transit with just 7 train and buses. Try living there when the 7 train is down. It's ok for Asians because many of them work there so they just need the bus.

I fear that Flushing will become a mini Beijing and the roads around town isn't setup for high population density. The sidewalks are narrow and it's crazy to wait for bus on main street during busy rush hour on a busy day.
Flushing also has the Port Washington LIRR branch, but it's got a bottleneck further east past Great Neck which prevents it from scheduling much more frequent runs during peak periods (though they could run more off-peak).

It's great for convenience if you're living, working, and shopping in Flushing and that's essentially what that is. I believe there have been periods where neighborhoods in the outer boroughs were much more complete retail and employment areas for the neighborhood and surrounding neighborhoods and Flushing is in some ways a hearkening back to such.

You can have high density and fairly narrow streets for the most part--you just can't have the main means of getting around be private automobiles. You'd have to design and build for other modes. An extension of the 7 and the Port Washington Branch and actually building more subways or elevated lines would do the trick, but MTA doesn't build all that quickly.
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Old 08-06-2019, 09:12 PM
 
6,355 posts, read 6,457,966 times
Reputation: 2915
Lets get back to the topic.

If Flushing back in 1994 was diverse and not all asian, then at what point was it all Koreans, and when did it become diverse, and then become 90% chinese?
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