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Old 08-06-2019, 10:38 PM
 
25 posts, read 2,966 times
Reputation: 25

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadypinesma View Post
Do any of you actually live in Flushing? I do.

White people are not moving here. Trust me.
No they aren't. I've lived in the area for 40 years. Ain't no white people in Flushing, unless they are "visiting" transients from the city thinking their is good food on main street. You can pick out the hipsters a mile away when compared to the handful of us OG whiteys still willing to hang around.
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Old 08-06-2019, 10:43 PM
 
25 posts, read 2,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
full of racist crap. white people don't live in Skyview not because they don't want to, but because they cannot afford it.
I'm in my 40s and make more money than the vast, vast majority of Asians in Flushing. So do most of my AMERICAN friends that also grew up in or around the Flushing area. And by Asians, I mean actual foreigners. Not Asian Americans.

Including Asian Americans, AIN'T no English speaking mofo's looking to live in Sky View regardless of affordability. Americans who grew up in Flushing can't wait to get out to the Island or Jersey.
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Old 08-06-2019, 11:02 PM
 
25 posts, read 2,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Lets get back to the topic.

If Flushing back in 1994 was diverse and not all asian, then at what point was it all Koreans, and when did it become diverse, and then become 90% chinese?
I moved to North Flushing/Whitestone as a kid in 1984. At that time, "downtown" Flushing aka main street was fairly bustling with majority English speaking businesses. I'd say the Korean presence was about 25% at best. Mostly laundry and restaurants. On a given day, you'd really see a true diversity of people coming and going. Black, White, Hispanic Americans...and then foreigners of all kinds. It wasn't really Asian or non-Asian, like it is today.

This held through I'd say to the late 1990s. I actually graduated Flushing High in 1991 and it was truly wonderfully diverse...again, not Asian or non Asian.

I guess for me I started to see the changes after 9/11. Whitestone had very few Asians past 149st where the Q14 turned north, however you started to see more and more Chinese on the bus and going deeper into Whitestone. They were clearly educated and made good money if they were living in Whitestone. However, it appears now, looking back, that they were being pushed out of Flushing as more and more illegals and poorer mainland Chinese moved into various parts of Flushing and its outskirts, flooding the housing stock and moving into illegal 2 family homes.

By 2010, it was clear that Flushing was basically now becoming a satellite city of mainland China. Chinese and Hong Kong American politicians were taking office. White people really had less and less of a voice. Black and Hispanics were systematically chased out of housing and employment as a result of Chinese racism. Let's be honest, it's probably shocking for a mainland Chinese person to come to America and interacting with "minorities." They feel more comfortable with white people to this day. This is basically how they get around the racism accusation.

As more Chinese money flooded the market, former white single family homes all over North Flushing/Whitestone/Bayside were leveled to make way for the McMansion. Now, instead of a 5 person white family unit on a street in a single family home you were now getting 15 mostly illegal Chinese mainlanders piling up into a McMansion and being charged lord knows what to live there by the new builder. This, of course, is a non-starter for whatever whites were left. Most have sold, happily to Chinse, taken their bag of money and left New York all together.

So, that's the true, accurate history you're likely to never hear from anyone else.
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Old 08-07-2019, 08:20 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 638,458 times
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I live in the north flushing/broadway area. Commercially, it is korean dominant. but residentially, it is still very diverse. You go to Browne park, and asians are probably half.
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Old 08-07-2019, 11:12 AM
 
25 posts, read 2,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
I live in the north flushing/broadway area. Commercially, it is korean dominant. but residentially, it is still very diverse. You go to Browne park, and asians are probably half.
Yes. I agree. There's still a strong group of white homeowners holding out around Bowne Park and headed north towards Holy Cross HS/Francis Lewis blvd. But they are aging older whites that are just too old to move. There are no young white families buying homes in the area.
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Old 08-07-2019, 07:21 PM
 
6,355 posts, read 6,457,966 times
Reputation: 2915
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussiaRussiaRussia View Post
I moved to North Flushing/Whitestone as a kid in 1984. At that time, "downtown" Flushing aka main street was fairly bustling with majority English speaking businesses. I'd say the Korean presence was about 25% at best. Mostly laundry and restaurants. On a given day, you'd really see a true diversity of people coming and going. Black, White, Hispanic Americans...and then foreigners of all kinds. It wasn't really Asian or non-Asian, like it is today.

This held through I'd say to the late 1990s. I actually graduated Flushing High in 1991 and it was truly wonderfully diverse...again, not Asian or non Asian.

I guess for me I started to see the changes after 9/11. Whitestone had very few Asians past 149st where the Q14 turned north, however you started to see more and more Chinese on the bus and going deeper into Whitestone. They were clearly educated and made good money if they were living in Whitestone. However, it appears now, looking back, that they were being pushed out of Flushing as more and more illegals and poorer mainland Chinese moved into various parts of Flushing and its outskirts, flooding the housing stock and moving into illegal 2 family homes.

By 2010, it was clear that Flushing was basically now becoming a satellite city of mainland China. Chinese and Hong Kong American politicians were taking office. White people really had less and less of a voice. Black and Hispanics were systematically chased out of housing and employment as a result of Chinese racism. Let's be honest, it's probably shocking for a mainland Chinese person to come to America and interacting with "minorities." They feel more comfortable with white people to this day. This is basically how they get around the racism accusation.

As more Chinese money flooded the market, former white single family homes all over North Flushing/Whitestone/Bayside were leveled to make way for the McMansion. Now, instead of a 5 person white family unit on a street in a single family home you were now getting 15 mostly illegal Chinese mainlanders piling up into a McMansion and being charged lord knows what to live there by the new builder. This, of course, is a non-starter for whatever whites were left. Most have sold, happily to Chinse, taken their bag of money and left New York all together.

So, that's the true, accurate history you're likely to never hear from anyone else.
People on this forum use to say Flushing used to be a Korean neighborhood before it became chinese.
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Old Today, 09:50 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 638,458 times
Reputation: 303
young whites cannot move to this area, as it is out of their price range. most houses are selling for 1.5 million, and new construction is going for more than 2 million. Asians are pouring with cash and knock those capes down and build mansions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RussiaRussiaRussia View Post
Yes. I agree. There's still a strong group of white homeowners holding out around Bowne Park and headed north towards Holy Cross HS/Francis Lewis blvd. But they are aging older whites that are just too old to move. There are no young white families buying homes in the area.
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Old Today, 09:52 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,378 posts, read 23,868,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
young whites cannot move to this area, as it is out of their price range. most houses are selling for 1.5 million, and new construction is going for more than 2 million. Asians are pouring with cash and knock those capes down and build mansions.
Again, it's not that they cannot as an entire group afford it--it is simply not worth the same value to them because it is not what they are looking for. There are a lot of young white people buying and living in expensive housing in Manhattan and Brooklyn that are easily as expensive as or much more expensive than in Flushing, but yet they choose to live there instead of Flushing.
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Old Today, 10:02 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 638,458 times
Reputation: 303
you are right, but it is not just flushing, it is the entire Northeast Queens. the price keeps going up, and the amenities are more and more chinese focused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Again, it's not that they cannot as an entire group afford it--it is simply not worth the same value to them because it is not what they are looking for. There are a lot of young white people buying and living in expensive housing in Manhattan and Brooklyn that are easily as expensive as or much more expensive than in Flushing, but yet they choose to live there instead of Flushing.
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Old Today, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,756 posts, read 34,898,793 times
Reputation: 8509
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Again, it's not that they cannot as an entire group afford it--it is simply not worth the same value to them because it is not what they are looking for. There are a lot of young white people buying and living in expensive housing in Manhattan and Brooklyn that are easily as expensive as or much more expensive than in Flushing, but yet they choose to live there instead of Flushing.
No subway service. It's not cool to take a bus to the train. Transplants ain't having that. Transplants don't mess with the NYC bus system like that. Especially in Brooklyn.
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