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Old Yesterday, 04:09 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,312 posts, read 23,803,150 times
Reputation: 11739

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Doesn’t Bed-Stuy usually have higher crime rates than Bushwick and Crown Heights?

Anyhow, when the gentry’s talking about Bushwick, you know what parts of Bushwick they’re talking about and those parts have continuously expanded. It’s definitely got a foothold out to the Wilson stop on the L and Kosciuzko on the J.

Probably rezoning the area around Broadway Junction to try to make it denser and attractive for corporate relocations or a specific industry that provide a wide variety of decent paying jobs like the film and television industry could help. For schools in the area, I’m in favor of longer hours and summer sessions for any districts that aren’t doing too well. Essentially this reduces the issue of the achievement gap that happens every summer in comparison to much more involved parents who have the time to be involved, gives kids less time to be involved in shenanigans, and essentially provides for working parents some relief in worrying about childcare while they work in what are probably pretty grueling jobs, and for parents that are layabouts, limits exposure of their kids to that since the kids are at school. Finally, I think a CUNY chapter near Broadway Junction, possibly with programs related to the specific industry mentioned above and with backing from private foundations, is good especially if it has a middle school and high school attached with selective admission but with preference for the local district residents.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; Yesterday at 04:31 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 05:04 AM
 
1,945 posts, read 576,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harrypothead View Post
And people talk like East NY and Brownsville are going to be gentrified any moment... lmao. Large parts of Bushwick still looks third world and the gentrification of Bushwick has been the talk of the town for how many years now? That hood still has a ways to go, maybe it's all hipster near Robertas but it's also crime and housing projects, fried chicken joints and dirty streets with litter
I'm very familiar with the neighborhood and the visible gentrification goes way further East than that. Like another poster said, there are many gentry businesses as far East as the Wilson Ave stop. Yes the neighborhood is pretty dirty, but so are plenty of gentrified neighborhoods.

It doesn't look like Park Slope, but that doesn't mean it's not rapidly gentrifying with very visible signs of gentrification. I also don't think it's that project heavy for a Brooklyn neighborhood. As far as I know, Hope Gardens is the only large housing project in Bushwick proper, and it's low rise.
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Old Yesterday, 05:54 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,181 posts, read 669,652 times
Reputation: 1748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
I dunno why Philly people love Rizzo. That city went to trash just like NY in the 70s under him.
Philly people don't love him, only a subset of old, white, working class people do. Anybody with half a brain knows he was a racist and terrible mayor. He was police chief and mayor of the city during the absolute lowest points in Philadelphia's history. Poverty, crime, drugs, and corruption ran rampant under his watch. He's held up as a hero by the above-mentioned people because he had a "tough-on-crime" approach toward select groups of people...
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Old Yesterday, 06:40 AM
 
8,168 posts, read 5,347,219 times
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You would need 24/7 police or military presence to get rid of all the gang-bangers.

You will need the city to inject a lot of $$$ in job and after-school programs, grants for small businesses, etc.

I would recommend destroying some of the housing projects.

I believe one of the issue is too many people in a small area.
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Old Yesterday, 06:58 AM
 
192 posts, read 42,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Philly people don't love him, only a subset of old, white, working class people do. Anybody with half a brain knows he was a racist and terrible mayor.
That's all I needed to hear....now I know he was a good mayor. Everyone said the same of Giullianni.
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Old Yesterday, 07:54 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,312 posts, read 23,803,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Ryu View Post
You would need 24/7 police or military presence to get rid of all the gang-bangers.

You will need the city to inject a lot of $$$ in job and after-school programs, grants for small businesses, etc.

I would recommend destroying some of the housing projects.

I believe one of the issue is too many people in a small area.
Maybe destroy some of the housing projects if their functional useful life and cost of repair and maintenance is more than the cost of demolishing, building new housing (since people have to go somewhere) and the repair and maintenance of that new housing. I donít think the density is necessarily itóitís how that density is arranged. I wonder if itís not just poverty, and then not just concentrated poverty, but additionally concentrated poverty with nothing else. Would a mixed-income, mixed-use environment ultimately improve things?

With that, I wonder if some kind of co-op model with the current residences and NYCHA can exist where residents become co-op owners if they make timely payments and then are allowed to sell on the free market, but with a substantial flip tax to further fund repairs and improvements. Itíd also give public housing residents as owners more incentive to allow additional free market development on its grounds such as its parking lots.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; Yesterday at 08:05 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 08:02 AM
 
8,168 posts, read 5,347,219 times
Reputation: 9372
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Maybe destroy some of the housing projects if their functional useful life and cost of repair and maintenance is more than the cost of demolishing, building new housing (since people have to go somewhere) and the repair and maintenance of that new housing. I donít think the density is necessarily itóitís how that density is arranged. I wonder if itís not just poverty, and then not just concentrated poverty, but additionally concentrated poverty with nothing else. Would a mixed-income, mixed-use environment ultimately improve things?

With that, I wonder if some kind of co-op model with the current residences and NYCHA can exist where residents become co-op owners if they make timely payments and then are allowed to sell on the free market, but with a substantial flip tax to further fund repairs and improvements. Itíd also give public housing residents as owners more incentive to allow additional free market development on its grounds such as its parking lots.
You have superblocks of housing projects. Same thing in East Harlem.

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Old Yesterday, 09:02 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,181 posts, read 669,652 times
Reputation: 1748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pope of Greenwich Village View Post
That's all I needed to hear....now I know he was a good mayor. Everyone said the same of Giullianni.
Then you are seriously lazy in making intelligent and informed decisions.
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Old Yesterday, 10:05 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,312 posts, read 23,803,150 times
Reputation: 11739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Ryu View Post
You have superblocks of housing projects. Same thing in East Harlem.
Yea, to the exclusion of everything else. So superblocks of public housing exist in other countries, but they arenít necessarily crime infested or devoid of commercial areas as the ones in NYC or the US in general for that matter. I think part of it might be to have residents have more skin in the game which is why I was wondering if there are any proposals or studies to convert them to co-ops with residents owning shares in that co-op, and with some restrictions. And with that, some commercial areas within these superblocks.
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Old Yesterday, 10:34 AM
 
192 posts, read 42,321 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Then you are seriously lazy in making intelligent and informed decisions.
People like you have made decision making easy. We just listen to you whine about whatever fevered delusion is making your head spin and cry racist this week and then we go ahead and do the opposite. We owe you a debt of gratitude for being the silliest generation ever spawned upon the face of the earth.
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