U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-01-2008, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,709,520 times
Reputation: 10450

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BXGEAR View Post
I have a friend in Marlboro. It's the countryside with lots of neat housing and commuters getting on and off coach buses
Excuse me; Marlboro was "countryside" 30 years ago. Today you can't even really call it suburbia anymore; it's become exurbia. Open spaces are disappearing right before your eyes as they put up more malls than you have fingers to count them on, and the majority of housing there is tract housing (yes, some is more expensive than others, but tract housing all the same).

As to the buses, believe me when I tell you that I took them to work, once upon a time. If you have a job in New York City (or even Newark, for that matter, since there's one bus that goes there), you can look forward to putting in a 13 or 14-hour day--if not longer--adding in commuting time. And the weekly commutation ticket, which was all of $25 once upon a time, has more than quintupled.

And when you open the fridge and see that you need a new container of milk, you can count on driving several miles to the shopping center.

Anyone who wants a "suburban lifestyle" like that is welcome to it. In fact, they get what they deserve!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-25-2009, 07:41 AM
 
48 posts, read 116,664 times
Reputation: 47
It's a tough decision to make. The best combination is to have a modest house at the Jersey Shore and a nice pad in Brooklyn. I think one needs the augmentation. That's the point that really has not been addressed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-25-2009, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,709,520 times
Reputation: 10450
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfabian View Post
It's a tough decision to make. The best combination is to have a modest house at the Jersey Shore and a nice pad in Brooklyn. I think one needs the augmentation. That's the point that really has not been addressed.
"Augmentation?" What do you mean by that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-25-2009, 03:04 PM
 
180 posts, read 447,380 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysocks View Post
People want a bigger house for the same amount of money, that's probably the most unbiased answer out there.
seems to be it. you'll get more for your money housing wise.

but now, you have that car payment, etc. that you need to throw in.

oh sheesh fabian: we're not all made of money!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2009, 05:43 PM
 
124 posts, read 334,176 times
Reputation: 47
Brooklyn in my opinion is the way to go. Bay ridge is very nice. If you want to pay less and live in a NJ town that is like Bay Ridge i would suggest Kearny, harrison, Bloomfield, Belleville, montclair(though not so much0 or Garfield. But you are not gonna get the Brooklyn amenities at all. Also the schools will probably not be as good though I don't really know. So in my opinion there is no contest between Bay Ridge and any Bay Ridge like town in NJ. Ive lived in Brooklyn and Jersey and gotta say for me Jersey doesn't hold a candle to BK
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2009, 07:20 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,646 posts, read 4,995,231 times
Reputation: 2263
NY'ers are so tedious & predictable.
You are picking the most way out & distant towns in NJ to compare.
Fred................. North Jersey does not consider Central NJ the "Suburbs". It's just way out in the cut. The place in between the ocean & "real NJ".
Bergen, Essex, Passaic & such have been conspicuously not discussed. Many are not "suburbs" per se, but old towns swallowed up by the Metro area.
They have their own walkable areas, eateries, ect, ect.
Let me stop though, this is an exercise in futility. NYC will forever & a day be the provincial epicenter of America.
There is no point............................. At least until you NY'ers have kids & then it's NJ or LI here I come.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2009, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,709,520 times
Reputation: 10450
Quote:
Originally Posted by openheads View Post
NY'ers are so tedious & predictable.
As opposed to New Jerseyites (Jerseyans? What do you call someone from that state, anyway?) who are exciting and unpredictable, I guess!

The fact of the matter is that there never would have been much development in New Jersey if it didn't happen to be wedged in between New York on one side and Philadelphia on the other. You can put down New York City--or any of its component boroughs--to your heart's content, but that doesn't change anything.

As to families...you may not have noticed, but there are a few million of them who call NYC home. And it isn't because they're forced to stay here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2009, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Historic Downtown Jersey City
2,705 posts, read 7,096,552 times
Reputation: 1191
There is a variety of neighborhoods in Brooklyn, and a variety of towns in NJ. In both Brooklyn and NJ, the landscape runs the full gamut from urban to suburban. For very urban, and walkable (no need for a car), look towards Hoboken and Jersey City. For suburban, but with a "hub" feel, look towards Montclair, the Caldwells, even Morristown.

For anybody to say that any neighborhood in NYC is greater than anywhere in NJ, is the most ridiculous thing I've heard on City Data. It is apples to oranges. There are many people in suburban NJ (and Long Island and Westchester) who hate NYC and never set a foot in it. So they would say anything in NJ is infinitely better than anything in NYC. It's equally as ignorant.

To KONY -- Is the ghetto of Brownsville Brooklyn better the nice brownstone neighborhoods in Jersey City that are lined with cafes and bars and has a thriving art scene?

Silly...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2009, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Tri-State Area
2,936 posts, read 5,044,786 times
Reputation: 1805
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrugglingMusician91 View Post
Brooklyn in my opinion is the way to go. Bay ridge is very nice. If you want to pay less and live in a NJ town that is like Bay Ridge i would suggest Kearny, harrison, Bloomfield, Belleville, montclair(though not so much0 or Garfield. But you are not gonna get the Brooklyn amenities at all. Also the schools will probably not be as good though I don't really know. So in my opinion there is no contest between Bay Ridge and any Bay Ridge like town in NJ. Ive lived in Brooklyn and Jersey and gotta say for me Jersey doesn't hold a candle to BK

Do not move to Garfield, Bloomfield, Belleville, Harrison or Kearny - unless you have the means to send your kids to private school. The school systems aren't as good as other more expensive towns. Montclair is pricey and some parts of it are nicer than others.

Here's what most New Jersey towns don't have, that Brooklyn has: You won't hear car alarms beeping at all hours of the day or night, no boom-boom coming from passing cars, no cherry-bomb mufflers from the hot-shot wannabees who sink all their cash into their cars, no garbarge on the street - every street in Brooklyn has some type of garbage in the street. There is rudeness in every state, just more of it seems to come out of NYC streets. The main language spoken in NY seems to be a combination of NY English, profanity and ebonics. Go into any school and hear the kids speak, you will be astounded. Most kids are polite in NJ, kids in Brooklyn can be quite rough around the edges depending on neighborhood. Brooklyn has higher levels of violent crime.

What Jersey lacks: a great public transportation system with frequent buses/trains. If you miss a Jersey transit change, you most likely are S.O.L. until the next one which depending on location could be almost an hours wait, if not longer. NJ Transit can be pricey, with one way tickets costing $4 and up. Cultural museums - have to go to NYC for that.
Great pizza/bagels, hands down Brooklyn wins! Lower taxes, stay in brooklyn - nj taxes will kill you here, long island is not much better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2009, 12:54 PM
 
Location: THE THRONE aka-New York City
3,012 posts, read 5,170,257 times
Reputation: 1143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
As opposed to New Jerseyites (Jerseyans? What do you call someone from that state, anyway?) who are exciting and unpredictable, I guess!

The fact of the matter is that there never would have been much development in New Jersey if it didn't happen to be wedged in between New York on one side and Philadelphia on the other. You can put down New York City--or any of its component boroughs--to your heart's content, but that doesn't change anything.

As to families...you may not have noticed, but there are a few million of them who call NYC home. And it isn't because they're forced to stay here.
i wouldnt even waste my time.

People need to stop comparing new york to anywhere else. New york is a completely different experience from any other city or state in the united states let alone new jersey.

If u want new york than move to new york. Its as simple as that


And its funny when jersians bring up brownsville, south bronx.....etc. None are comparable to newark, camden trenton.......etc lmao
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top