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Old 10-12-2008, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,503 posts, read 17,193,948 times
Reputation: 2043

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Quote:
Originally Posted by welder View Post

P.S. Don't worry about the "SuperMario's" post either. The same 4 things he listed about Buffalo, could be said about NYC too! (with the exception of abandonment)
Not really. As a whole NYC crime rate is pretty low for a city it's size. It also has receieves new plans and developments. It has it's bad areas like any city, but Buffalo I think has a 40% poverty rate...and thats an entire city! I heard Buffalo being compared to Cleveland. Another city which is in need of help. Also people are not flocking to Buffalo like they are NYC. Dont blame me, when you look at crime statistics and poverty rates, not to mention photos and what I hear from other people, I get a sense that Buffalo is a very depressing place.
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Old 10-12-2008, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Queens
536 posts, read 2,091,211 times
Reputation: 166
Buffalo is a doughnut city like Detroit where everything of importance happens in the 'burbs. Because of that, it's not my kind of place.
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Old 10-12-2008, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Now in Houston!
922 posts, read 3,405,425 times
Reputation: 662
Quote:
Buffalo is a doughnut city like Detroit where everything of importance happens in the 'burbs.
Exactly -- With the rate of home deterioration, abandonment and subsequent demolition, much of the inner city (mostly East Side) has been transformed into an "urban prairie". Blocks that used to be filled with tightly-packed homes now many only have a 4-5 houses surrounded by stretches of grass and weeds. It's shocking. It is literally becoming doughnut, hollow in the center.

There is, however, a decent amount condo/loft construction downtown, and people moving back to the urban core, which is a good thing. The north side (which looks a lot like the Marine Park area of Brooklyn) and the Elmwood Village district are good areas too, but the East West Side ghettos are as bad as it gets. The suburbs have great quality of life - that is actually affordable - and excellent schools.

One note about the weather - it is not nearly as cold as people think. At any given moment, the temperature is 5-10 degrees cooler than NYC - summer and winter. Generally, if it is cold here, it's just a little colder there. If it is 95 here, it's usually in the eighties there.
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:13 PM
 
Location: BUFFALO, NY
1,576 posts, read 4,712,464 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by welder View Post
I've been to Buffalo several times. LOVE the hot wings in those bars up there! The thing about those photos you posted, the same could've been done to just about EVERY major city (Buffalo still is considered a major metro area) in America.

Buffalo can be lumped in with Cleveland and Pittsburgh. Besides having similiar populations, ALL 3 are 'considered' "dying cities". I'm not knocking Buffalo, it does have some good points, but, you did leave out the fact that "Forbes" listed it as a "dying city".

Downtown Buffalo seemed dead to me. Even though Buffalo and Pittsburgh have similiar populations, Pittsburgh seemed more of a 'big city' to me than Buffalo did. I did see some 'cool neighborhoods' there though. But, some of the things you're saying about it, seems like a STRETCH to say the least.

I'm not saying it don't have it's fair share of 'pros' to living there. But it's a 'blue collar' city, and it ain't going to attract alot of professional types. "Wild West"? Some of these NYC people crack me up. They don't have a clue what 'West' really is (I guess Albany is the Mid-West LOL).

P.S. Don't worry about the "SuperMario's" post either. The same 4 things he listed about Buffalo, could be said about NYC too! (with the exception of abandonment)

Ok then, thank you for the post, and just to let you and others know, when Forbes listed Buffalo as a dying city, it was based on older statistics. About 10 years has made a big difference in Buffalo, thus this thread to see if anyone was catching word of the hidden gem of Buffalo finally refueling after sucking dry it's gas for a few decades now.
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Now in Houston!
922 posts, read 3,405,425 times
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To Buffalonian4Life: The claim of the Guaranty Building as "the first skyscraper" is a bit of a stretch, but understandable since that is the local conventional wisdom.

The 13-story Guaranty Building is certainly one of the first "skyscrapers", built in 1894 with a steel-frame construction method which allowed for greater height. However, the building's architect, Louis Sullivan, built the 10-story Wainwright building in St. Louis three years prior, which also used a steel structure. It looks very similar to the Guaranty building.

However, the Guaranty building is an impressive and VERY important piece of American architecture, and is considered Sullivan's masterpiece. So, Buffalonians should rightfully be proud of it.

The very first steel-frame high-rise was, in fact, the 10-story Home Insurance Building in Chicago. It was built in 1885, but demolished in the thirties.
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Old 10-12-2008, 09:40 PM
 
Location: BUFFALO, NY
1,576 posts, read 4,712,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstaterInBklyn View Post
To Buffalonian4Life: The claim of the Guaranty Building as "the first skyscraper" is a bit of a stretch, but understandable since that is the local conventional wisdom.

The 13-story Guaranty Building is certainly one of the first "skyscrapers", built in 1894 with a steel-frame construction method which allowed for greater height. However, the building's architect, Louis Sullivan, built the 10-story Wainwright building in St. Louis three years prior, which also used a steel structure. It looks very similar to the Guaranty building.

However, the Guaranty building is an impressive and VERY important piece of American architecture, and is considered Sullivan's masterpiece. So, Buffalonians should rightfully be proud of it.

The very first steel-frame high-rise was, in fact, the 10-story Home Insurance Building in Chicago. It was built in 1885, but demolished in the thirties.
Sorry! Close enough I think, but my apologies.

Elicott Square building in downtown Buffalo - 1896, largest office building in the world for 16 years. This I know for a fact.
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Old 10-12-2008, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,750 posts, read 25,521,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalonian4life View Post
Elicott Square building in downtown Buffalo - 1896, largest office building in the world for 16 years. This I know for a fact.
Indeed, Ellicott Square was the largest office building. And, Daniel Burnham was also chief architect on NYC's own iconic Flatiron Building and DC's own Union Station and Postal Square. Much of his work, however, was concentrated throughout the Midwest: Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Columbus.

Owing to Buffalo's prominence in grain and steel with a railroad hub at the end of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries, is one of the main reason as to why there are many prominent buildings in historic architectural terms in Buffalo. The city's past economy fostered the work of noted architects such as Sullivan, Wright, Richardson, Burnham, and others from the Chicago school are to be found in Buffalo as the city was one of the prominent Great Lakes manufacturing and processing cities.
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Old 10-13-2008, 08:53 AM
 
Location: BUFFALO, NY
1,576 posts, read 4,712,464 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwguydc View Post
Indeed, Ellicott Square was the largest office building. And, Daniel Burnham was also chief architect on NYC's own iconic Flatiron Building and DC's own Union Station and Postal Square. Much of his work, however, was concentrated throughout the Midwest: Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Columbus.

Owing to Buffalo's prominence in grain and steel with a railroad hub at the end of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries, is one of the main reason as to why there are many prominent buildings in historic architectural terms in Buffalo. The city's past economy fostered the work of noted architects such as Sullivan, Wright, Richardson, Burnham, and others from the Chicago school are to be found in Buffalo as the city was one of the prominent Great Lakes manufacturing and processing cities.

Nice post . Are those buildings in New York and DC still standing? Sound interesting to say the least .
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Old 10-13-2008, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,750 posts, read 25,521,951 times
Reputation: 6676
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalonian4life View Post
Nice post . Are those buildings in New York and DC still standing? Sound interesting to say the least .
Yes, they are. Union Station was in a terrible state of neglect, but luckily was restored so that it did not meet the fate of New York's original Pennsylvania Station. And Postal Square is now the home to a post office, a local brewpub and the US Postal Museum.

I think that your posts on Buffalo give some good insightl, since so many unfairly stereotype it without knowing its full place in history. Buffalo is not the North Pole since many places get the lake-effect snows, nor is it a hick town in the shadow of NYC. It's a city in transition, and it's in the interest of all New Yorkers that the city survives and finds itself again, since a revived Buffalo is good for the state's economy, something lost sight of once one is too far south of Albany.

I know three people off the top of my head who were born or who have lived in Buffalo and it's a city they'd go back to in a second, if it were not for their occupations that keep them in other cities.

Maybe to attract those unaccustomed to lake-effect snows, Buffalo should undertake a newly revised city plan that's akin to Montreal's underground city or Minneapolis' sky bridges. I'd not like to see that negatively impact the historic buildings, but in areas of blight where the land is practically cleared, some sort of new colony could be built that could integrate much of the live/work in climate-controlled comfort. Why should Montreal have all the fun with the underground?
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Old 10-13-2008, 12:56 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,020 posts, read 8,265,617 times
Reputation: 1785
When I think of Buffalo, I think of:

Manufacturing long gone
Classic buildings
Cold, snowy winters
Inexpensive
Dwindling population
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