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Old 08-04-2008, 03:29 PM
 
18 posts, read 77,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liberal elite View Post
Los Angeles is FAR from glitzy. Ew.
LA is obsessed with image. Wealth is flaunted in the form of clothes, cars, property, etc.. Even people that aren't rich stretch their budgets through showy means.

Perhaps you're confusing glitz with beauty.
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Old 08-04-2008, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
1,362 posts, read 4,121,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by analyticalkeys View Post
The transit is 25 cents cheaper, and doesn't cover as many areas as NYC, so it's not like there aren't two sides to this.
I meant Chicago overall isn't as pricey as NYC. That part wasn't transit related.
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Old 08-04-2008, 03:46 PM
 
98 posts, read 85,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ridestick66 View Post
LA is obsessed with image. Wealth is flaunted in the form of clothes, cars, property, etc.. Even people that aren't rich stretch their budgets through showy means.

Perhaps you're confusing glitz with beauty.
A lot of Los Angelenos drive nice cars, but 99% of them don't dress glitzy (tacky) and certainly don't live in glitzy looking homes.

Metro Los Angeles median income is far below NYC and Chicago so with the exception of driving leased Mercedes and BMWs (even though they live in ratty apartments) , it isn't much of glitzy place.
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Old 08-04-2008, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,832 posts, read 21,506,455 times
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I don't like LA either. I think a city should be at least somewhat walkable and LA isn't at all. It's also really dirty, and the people are pretty cold. How the heck are New Yorkers known as the cold rude ones?!
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Old 08-04-2008, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,755 posts, read 25,542,103 times
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Part of the misconception of LA is that it is glitzy, just like the view that Manhattan's choice areas are all that there is to NYC. Most people view the Westside, the Hills, and parts of the Valley as representative of LA and that it's a beach culture, etc. The people are more glitzy in that they are generally more image-obsessed than NYC, and that helps to foster the prevailing wisdom that your life is not complete if you are not at the forefront of the latest trends.

It is a very suburban city, though, and downtown LA is not as special as NYC. Plus, it seems no matter what time of day, there's the risk of a backup on the freeway. That said, there are things I like about Los Angeles, but I find it to be a very unsettled place, and it's almost intangible as to why it gives this perception, but it is easy to isolate onseself in "paradise" if the means are there.
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Old 08-04-2008, 04:19 PM
 
18 posts, read 77,887 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberal elite View Post
A lot of Los Angelenos drive nice cars, but 99% of them don't dress glitzy (tacky) and certainly don't live in glitzy looking homes.

Metro Los Angeles median income is far below NYC and Chicago so with the exception of driving leased Mercedes and BMWs (even though they live in ratty apartments) , it isn't much of glitzy place.
When dealing with the LA Metro you are including the Inland Empire which is a dump, and most of LA is for that matter.

I doubt the OP is thinking of LA in terms of the Inland Empire, or NY in terms of some far away suburb in New Jersey.

Since the OP sounds like a recent college grad and contemplating a move to LA, I assumed he would (and if he isn't he should) be looking to relocate to the Westside, where the true pulse of the city is centered.

If you feel that the Westside of LA is not glitzy then we are just going to have to agree to disagree.

Last edited by ridestick66; 08-04-2008 at 04:49 PM..
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Old 08-04-2008, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Bay Ridge, NY
1,915 posts, read 7,131,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
I meant Chicago overall isn't as pricey as NYC. That part wasn't transit related.
Well, I hate to say it, but the tax in Chicago is higher (the highest in the country I think), and is continually rising, and lots of small goods there are more expensive than here.. the way things are going, I don't think the less pricey notion will last for long.. I love Chicago though, it's got the nice city feel, a lot of nice people, and it's got a lot of nice views, and you don't have to necessarily live very far to commute into the city, while still retaining your exurban feel.
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Old 08-04-2008, 11:31 PM
 
2 posts, read 8,759 times
Reputation: 11
Los angels is a nice place dont know why you guys down it, it realy has changed i bet none of you even been to LA your just saying those horriable things just because your being bias. You should give L.A. a chance and see the city as it is today not from its dark past and new york has its icky sides as well.
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Old 08-04-2008, 11:40 PM
 
409 posts, read 1,344,196 times
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I think Chicago would be the easiest transition. It keeps the midwestern ideals while still being a truly global city. One issue with Chicago and Los Angeles is that they both have the highest percentage of people using a car to commute of the top ten cities in the US by population. Traffic in both Chicago and Los Angeles can be a nightmare. Public transit in Chicago is outstanding and I have to say better than New York. Depending on where you are living the actual city of Chicago is equal to Los Angeles in terms of housing. Los Angeles has more affordable suburban style housing in the city. New York is very expensive but the Ritz-Carlton Residences on Michigan Avenue in Chicago is the highest priced residential development (per square foot) in the United States. Chicago has the highest gas prices in the country most of the time. The Chicago suburbs tend to be more expensive than the New York suburbs and tend to be equal to Los Angeles's limited selection of suburbs. Good Luck!
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Old 08-05-2008, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,755 posts, read 25,542,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nyc baby View Post
Los angels is a nice place dont know why you guys down it, it realy has changed i bet none of you even been to LA your just saying those horriable things just because your being bias. You should give L.A. a chance and see the city as it is today not from its dark past and new york has its icky sides as well.
If you are referring to me, I know LA extremely well, having lived a bi-coastal existence for years, and parts of the city have made strides, that's true, especially in the recovery after the real estate issues of the early 90s and the riots; and, hopefully the current real estate issues will not set off a massive correction as has happened previously in the region.

There are aspects to the greater LA-Orange County areas that I do like and enjoy, but the city is more of an amalgamation of smaller areas as opposed to a cohesive entity, and LA does not have the same character as one tends to find in New York. LA is the epitome of sprawl, something that is dissimilar from New York, since sprawl is limited by geography. It's not as easy for some people to find their own niche in LA, as they can in NYC, and the culture is decidedly different than anywhere else. Friends whom I know well, and are SoCal natives, refer to it as "the country of California," an apt description in that the differences in the area are so significant.

I go beyond the old arguments of earthquakes, fires, mudslides, riots, and all of the other exaggerated descriptors of what life in LA is like, but the reality is that a large portion of one's day is spent behind the wheel, even if you are fortunate enough to work close to home, since it is a car culture and few people walk. The ideal of the "little big city," where everyone had their patch of yard, upon which LA was originally structured, and was actually supported by a superb public transportation system that linked LA with many coastal cities via trolleys and trains, inland to Pasadena and the San Gabriel, has long since faded from view. The advent of the freeways and destruction of the trolley and train lines created the situation that now exists in the region, with perpetually clogged roadways and smog. Higher gas prices recently have forced some to take public transportation, if it goes where one needs it to go, since it's not exactly convenient and is a sad shadow of the comprehensive system that existed in the region. I am not old enough to have known the old Los Angeles, before the demolition of the Pacific Electric Red Car lines, and similar transportation systems, but have heard marvelous things about them from long-term residents and people of my grandparents' generation. Moreover, I am not one who exclusively flocks to public transportation, but it does help to make a place more livable, especially for newer residents who don't know their way around by car. In contrast, New York grew on its transportation routes, subways, trains, parkways, waterways, and even highways, but the main tenents of providing an excellent transportation network was not lost, generally speaking, such that one has options of travel from pretty far out locations to Manhattan in a reasonable amount of time for the distance covered.

Being more densely packed, New York has a taller structure in the central business districts, and has neighborhoods that coexist and allow people to find what they want within the city's borders, be it an apartment in the sky with stunning views or a single family home on a nice piece of property. In LA, you are less likely to find a tall building, save for downtown with the Library Tower, etc., and the low-rise character of much of the city provides for more of a garden apartment lifestyle and small bungalow house development, which has its merits, but tends to take up much more land and thus creates spread out areas that don't have the same sort of neighborhood anchors that one finds in New York, and even Chicago.

I also find New Yorkers to be much more accepting of people and there is not the same level of division that one finds in Southern California, LA in particular. Part of the reason why there are such divisions is due to the isolation that one has within the city's borders, since people have barriers to travel for a multitude of reasons, including transportation and socioeconomic status. You can easily find people who live within the city's limits for whom a trip to the beach is a major undertaking, such that they may have only been there a couple of times in their lives. Some people never leave the Westside, and others never venture to the Westside. People in the Valley are isolated by geography and cultural differences, yet they are within the city limits. LA has more regional pockets of people, and many do not mix at all.

I am not judging LA harshly at all, since the city offers a lot if you can tolerate its shortcomings, but for someone who is thinking about moving there, the reality of it is not likely to be the paradise by the sea that many are sold when they envision the area. Just starting out, as the OP is doing, considering NYC, LA, and Chicago, while coming from Omaha, the adjustement can be quite harsh in greater Los Angeles.

LA is a great city, for me, though I would not resign my New Yorker status to become an Angelino. Some of the things that I love about LA include: the views one gets from The Hills; the abundant parks, Griffith and Runyon Canyon in particular; the proximity to the beach and the neighborhood feel of housing on the Westside; the proximity to Pasadena and San Marino; the palm trees and climate, especially when it's winter on the east coast; proximity to Catalina Island and the relative ease of going for a sail on the ocean; the charm of Hollywoodland and Venice; the diverse shops and restaurants that exist within the region, and I do commute to get to them; and some wonderful museums and historic houses, especially the Getty, LACMA, MOCA. That's just the tip of what I love about LA, but one has to be able to afford to live that lifestyle in terms of costs, not just economic ones.

I agree that New York is far from perfection in many areas, but it offers a great mix of features, and a welcoming culture that is used to diverse people and cultures, since there's no choice but to coexist in many parts of the city. There are enclaves to be sure, but these neighborhoods do not tend to be as isolated as in LA. New York is more of an international destination than LA, owing to its history as a major point of entry via Ellis Island in past generations, and continuing today as an aspirational city for many new residents.
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