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Old 08-05-2008, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, New York
371 posts, read 990,331 times
Reputation: 63

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Move to ny. Thats where alot of kids in college and college graduates are moving to. Since it is expensive you should move in with a buddy, Thats what city officials say to kids who are moving to nyc. You also get alot of job opportunities and internships.
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Old 08-05-2008, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, New York
371 posts, read 990,331 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nysee53 View Post
I think Chicago would be the easiest transition. It keeps the midwestern ideals while still being a truly global city. One issue with Chicago and Los Angeles is that they both have the highest percentage of people using a car to commute of the top ten cities in the US by population. Traffic in both Chicago and Los Angeles can be a nightmare. Public transit in Chicago is outstanding and I have to say better than New York. Depending on where you are living the actual city of Chicago is equal to Los Angeles in terms of housing. Los Angeles has more affordable suburban style housing in the city. New York is very expensive but the Ritz-Carlton Residences on Michigan Avenue in Chicago is the highest priced residential development (per square foot) in the United States. Chicago has the highest gas prices in the country most of the time. The Chicago suburbs tend to be more expensive than the New York suburbs and tend to be equal to Los Angeles's limited selection of suburbs. Good Luck!
Chicago transit is better by what means?

NYC
Transportation in New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chicago
Mass transit in Chicago - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:19 AM
 
274 posts, read 1,000,437 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridestick66 View Post
LA is obsessed with image. Wealth is flaunted in the form of clothes, cars, property, etc.. Even people that aren't rich stretch their budgets through showy means.
You think Manhattanites aren't obsessed with image and wealth??? This is the home of $25 drinks.

Handbags, shoes, clothes, apt square footage, car service, bottle service, being in the "right" neighborhood, the right clubs, Hamptons, etc.
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:29 AM
 
274 posts, read 1,000,437 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
NYC is great but a lot of it is hype. It's horribly expensive just to live there but if you can swing it it might be worth it. I find a lot of people that move there do so just to say they live there. They never really seem to have specific reasons but more like it's the in thing to do.
Very true.

The original poster is better off in LA or Chicago. There are a spectrum of neighborhoods and lifestyles to choose from.

In NYC, you have no choice but to be constantly surrounded by the same two types of people: the wealthy and the poor.
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Old 08-05-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI
141 posts, read 328,689 times
Reputation: 294
I've lived in the L. A. area and in New York, and can comment on some differences between the two.

Getting around: Los Angeles is a city with a pronounced car culture; it's very difficult to get around without a car. The reverse is true in New York, where it is very difficult to deal with having a car and pretty easy to get around without one. Walking is a way of life in New York; not so much in Los Angeles. Because of rising gas prices, public transportation is getting more use in both areas. This has actually been the cause of some difficulty recently in New York, as the subways have been pressed beyond capacity as more and more commuters choose to use them. In Los Angeles, people take pride in their cars, and I found it quite enjoyable to navigate the freeways, though of course they are prone to gridlock at various times. However, travel by car has the side-effect of isolating commuters, whereas in New York, the experience of using public transportation is a "slice of life" adventure where you get to encounter people from all walks of life every day as you and they travel from one place to another. I find it much easier to isolate and insulate yourself culturally in L.A. than it is in New York, though the diversity of culture is in both places if you seek it out.

Weather: Los Angeles has the perk that draw many people to it of practically having spring or summer weather year-round. It does rain in Southern California, but not much, and it does get colder in winter, but not much. However, it's a desert climate and the discrepancy between daytime and nighttime temperatures can take some getting used to. New York has winters, and brutal ones at that: they're not the coldest you'll find in a major city, but the lack of sunlight in the winter can and will wreak havoc on your state of mind. The smog is worse in L.A., but air quality ain't great at either place. New Yorkers can brag about a lot of things, but L.A. is the only of the two where you can brag about sunning by the pool on a 80 degree day in February. What you'll be bragging about in New York is how tough the winters there have made you

Setting: Los Angeles is the definition of sprawl, while New York is contained within a large, but firmly set, boundary. In Southern California, you will find lots of strip mall type set-ups geared toward car owners, while New York has shops on every street corner and more finely defined city districts. When I was in L.A., the downtown area was a joke--not much going on there--while New York is the definition of the classic city environment of towering buildings and bustling financial and business districts. L. A. is nestled in a more diverse landscape than New York--for not too far of a drive in L.A., you can travel to towering mountains, forested areas, parks, deserts, and beaches. In New York, your nature travels will take you to places like the Catskills or Adirondacks, those northeastern deciduous forest environments you won't find in L.A. New York's closest metropolitan neighbors include Jersey City, Newark, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington, D. C., while Los Angeles's closest metropolitan neighbors are San Diego, Phoenix, and Las Vegas.

The locals: People are fairly friendly in both places, but while New Yorkers are more blunt and sarcastic than Angelenos, they're also more likely to interact with you. The car culture of L.A. creates a mindset where people are cut off from one another, and the social experience of the entire city reflects that: people from different neighborhoods don't tend to interact that much and people tend to focus more on their "entourages" and stay within them. In New York, people who don't know each other are constantly bumping into each other on the subway and on the street and I've found that this makes New Yorkers much more community minded than Angelenos. I've seen far more people willing to talk to and help 'strangers' in New York than anywhere else I've been, including L.A. It's also more of a cultural 'melting pot' where there's more interaction between people that are different. New Yorkers tend to be more high energy and focused on work, whereas Angelenos are a bit more laid back about things. New Yorkers are sharp and sarcastic, whereas Angelenos are a bit more mellow and hippie-ish in how they think and talk about the world. Folks at both places are equally crazy

Things to do: Both places are crammed full of things to do; you won't be bored in either one. Fun for New Yorkers tends to be more focused indoors, while Angelenos focus more activity in outdoor settings. Both cities are great places if you want to be able to go to a museum, catch a limited-release independent movie, dance at a club, or go to a rock show. You're going to find more of interest in terms of history in New York. Given the concentration on the entertainment industry in Los Angeles, you're going to find that a lot of what the city has to offer centers around that. New York is without doubt a more intellectual city and has more to do that caters to you if you're an intellectual. L.A. is obviously a better site for activities that involve "fun in the sun," while New York has much more going on in terms of the diversity of what you'll find as you move from one neighborhood to another. In New York, you will find neighborhoods that reflect almost every corner of the globe, while the cultural 'melting pot' of L.A., due to history and geography, is more focused on the intersection of Anglo, Latino, and Asian cultures, which are more isolated from one another than they are in New York. So basically, if you want to spend more time outside in the sun, go to L.A.; if you want to be at the hub of an intellectual and cultural crossroads, go to New York. But both places have some of both aspects; you can find intellectual pursuits in L.A. and fun things to do outside in the New York area.

The 'vibe': Overall, Los Angeles is a sprawling city that has more the feel of endless suburbia than an urban environment, whereas New York is the classic blueprint for what we think of as an urban environment. On average, Angelenos have a more relaxed attitude about life, whereas New Yorkers are more driven. You're more likely to hear someone spout a New Age platitude in L.A. than in New York, while you're more likely to hear people speak of life cynically in New York. Nonetheless, New Yorkers seem to feel more driven to address social issues than Angelenos. On average, New Yorkers are tougher and more no-nonsense than Angelenos, at the expense of being a bit more gruff and cynical. In Los Angeles, the endlessly sunny skies tend to make people more cheerful, if also a little more soft-headed
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Old 08-05-2008, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Queens, N.Y.
661 posts, read 1,000,252 times
Reputation: 766
Nice post
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Old 08-05-2008, 12:28 PM
 
215 posts, read 697,819 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
I'm from Omaha and my time in NYC has never been a major culture shock.

I've been to Chicago the most out of those three and out of the 3 big ones I'd pick Chicago. The transit is good and it's not nearly as pricey. I find Chicago to be more what NYC was like 20-30 years ago when it lived up to the hype.
NYC was one of the most dangerous places to live in 20-30 years ago, and so are you saying Chicago is dirty and dangerous now?


Exactly what hype are you talking about?
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Old 08-05-2008, 01:09 PM
 
149 posts, read 145,494 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nysee53 View Post
I think Chicago would be the easiest transition. It keeps the midwestern ideals while still being a truly global city. One issue with Chicago and Los Angeles is that they both have the highest percentage of people using a car to commute of the top ten cities in the US by population. Traffic in both Chicago and Los Angeles can be a nightmare. Public transit in Chicago is outstanding and I have to say better than New York. Depending on where you are living the actual city of Chicago is equal to Los Angeles in terms of housing. Los Angeles has more affordable suburban style housing in the city. New York is very expensive but the Ritz-Carlton Residences on Michigan Avenue in Chicago is the highest priced residential development (per square foot) in the United States. Chicago has the highest gas prices in the country most of the time. The Chicago suburbs tend to be more expensive than the New York suburbs and tend to be equal to Los Angeles's limited selection of suburbs. Good Luck!
What?

The Ritz-Carlton residences in Chicago are cheap as hell. They sell at $950-$1,000 per square foot, which seems on par with the VERY low-end development in Manhattan. Even luxury condos in Harlem sell for more than that. In comparison, 15 Central Park West sells for $4,000 per square foot for the non-park views and resales at $15,000 per square foot for park views which makes it the most expensive in the world.

$80,000,000 LISTING AT 15 CENTRAL PARK WEST

Chicago is a very cheap place.
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Old 08-06-2008, 08:36 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,645,283 times
Reputation: 3699
I would strongly recommend that you visit New York or LA before you move to either. I know it's an expense, but those two cities have a very unique (and different) feel to them, and it's nothing like it is on TV.

The only reason to live in New York or LA is because you really want to live in New York or LA. They are so expensive and you have to sacrifice so much to live there that, unless you have an emotional attachement to the place, it's not worth it and you'll probably be miserable. Note: People who love New York usually hate LA, and vice versa.

It's very difficult to have anything approaching a middle class lifestyle in New York on less than $80,000 to $100,000. When I lived in Minneapolis ('97 to '02) I had a one-bedroom apartment in the nicest neighborhood in town for $700. Here a one-bedroom in a good neighborhood (anywhere in Manhattan or the nice parts of Brooklyn) would be well over $2,000, probably closer to $3,000.
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Old 08-06-2008, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, New York
371 posts, read 990,331 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
I would strongly recommend that you visit New York or LA before you move to either. I know it's an expense, but those two cities have a very unique (and different) feel to them, and it's nothing like it is on TV.

The only reason to live in New York or LA is because you really want to live in New York or LA. They are so expensive and you have to sacrifice so much to live there that, unless you have an emotional attachement to the place, it's not worth it and you'll probably be miserable. Note: People who love New York usually hate LA, and vice versa.

It's very difficult to have anything approaching a middle class lifestyle in New York on less than $80,000 to $100,000. When I lived in Minneapolis ('97 to '02) I had a one-bedroom apartment in the nicest neighborhood in town for $700. Here a one-bedroom in a good neighborhood (anywhere in Manhattan or the nice parts of Brooklyn) would be well over $2,000, probably closer to $3,000.
There are nice neighborhoods all around the 5 boroughs
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