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Old 01-03-2010, 12:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
this is why rent stabilization was created. even though it ts a free market, everybody has a body to govern them. wall street got the SEC, airline industry has FAA, media has FCC, food and medicine is FDA. who governs the landlords to ensure that they wont "exploit" the system, and charge these exorbitant rents? if you say something is wrong withh the current system is fine, but to abolish it completely, and have no supervision over landlords and what they charge for rent is ridiculous. everybody argues that the market will only charge what it can bear but thats crap because tell me why 3 bedroom apartments in my neighborhood are going for $1500 a month in some cases...
The FAA, FCC and FDA control quality of the respective industries. They are the equivalent of habitability codes, not price controls, like rent stabilization.

The SEC mostly functions the same way, controlling the quality of financial disclosure. While it also polices activity that is illegal, I don't think the SEC maintains any price controls, except things like maximum fees you are allowed to charge retail investors. I might be wrong, I have limited knowledge of SEC activities.

 
Old 01-03-2010, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
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Originally Posted by gradstudent77 View Post
The FAA, FCC and FDA control quality of the respective industries. They are the equivalent of habitability codes, not price controls, like rent stabilization.

The SEC mostly functions the same way, controlling the quality of financial disclosure. While it also polices activity that is illegal, I don't think the SEC maintains any price controls, except things like maximum fees you are allowed to charge retail investors. I might be wrong, I have limited knowledge of SEC activities.
i just used those examples to show that major industries in the US have some sort of regulatory commission, and real estate should have one as well.
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Old 01-03-2010, 12:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
i just used those examples to show that major industries in the US have some sort of regulatory commission, and real estate should have one as well.
But, real estate does: its housing codes. You can't sell or rent out a unit that doesn't have windows, for example, even if the market would allow you to. Thus, real estate has the sort of oversight that those regulatory commissions you cited have. I don't think the FAA is limiting how much one can sell airline tickets for, but I might be wrong about that.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gradstudent77 View Post
But, real estate does: its housing codes. You can't sell or rent out a unit that doesn't have windows, for example, even if the market would allow you to. Thus, real estate has the sort of oversight that those regulatory commissions you cited have. I don't think the FAA is limiting how much one can sell airline tickets for, but I might be wrong about that.
there is not one single unit that is responsible for real estate. in NYC alone, you have NYFD, HPD, and Dept of buildings that govern housing maintenance/fire code/building code. i would like to see it more unified into one structure that enforces building issues, cost of rent included.

forgot one more agency: DHCR
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Old 01-03-2010, 01:29 PM
 
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Lies again. There are no "10,000 Notre Dame grads with trust funds" flooding into New York City. Statistically, the white non-Hispanic population of NYC has likely stayed flat over the last 10 years, after collapsing from close to 90% to 35% of the population in the 2nd half of the 20th century. For every recent white college grad coming into the city, there is an old-time New Yorker leaving the city for greener pastures.

So, repeat after me: from the standpoint of statistics, THERE IS NO OVERALL GENTRIFICATION in New York City. So, if it's not the moneyed whites who are overcrowding New York City, then who is?

It is the immigrants, of course. Partly Asian, but Latino in their vast majority, they come to the city in droves because their communities are there. With non-Hispanic white population staying roughly the same and non-Hispanic black population perhaps even falling, the number of Hispanic New Yorkers has grown by several hundred thousand between 2000-2010.

The housing industry has not caught up, partly because of restrictive building codes, partly because of high construction costs due to unions, land prices and regulations.

Sadly, NYC's problems appear to be unsolveable. It's a city that has mostly run out of land, refuses to build higher density housing in most neighborhoods, and yet continues to be a magnet to immigrants (as it has always been). Immigrants will continue to pay a steep premium to be close to their communities, but plain-vanilla New Yorkers will perpetually wonder why they're overpaying to live in a city of immigrants (as they have been since the 19th century).

And I will repeat a very simple observation: if you're not a recent immigrant or a member of a similarly insular community, and you don't have a job that's not replicable elsewhere (TV producer, Wall Streeter, etc.), you will substantially improve your standard of living if you move away from greater New York City. Almost every other part of the country has a significantly higher standard of living for the generic middle class.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
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Originally Posted by Woozle View Post
Lies again. There are no "10,000 Notre Dame grads with trust funds" flooding into New York City. Statistically, the white non-Hispanic population of NYC has likely stayed flat over the last 10 years, after collapsing from close to 90% to 35% of the population in the 2nd half of the 20th century. For every recent white college grad coming into the city, there is an old-time New Yorker leaving the city for greener pastures.
So, repeat after me: from the standpoint of statistics, THERE IS NO OVERALL GENTRIFICATION in New York City. So, if it's not the moneyed whites who are overcrowding New York City, then who is?
It is the immigrants, of course. Partly Asian, but Latino in their vast majority, they come to the city in droves because their communities are there. With non-Hispanic white population staying roughly the same and non-Hispanic black population perhaps even falling, the number of Hispanic New Yorkers has grown by several hundred thousand between 2000-2010.
The housing industry has not caught up, partly because of restrictive building codes, partly because of high construction costs due to unions, land prices and regulations.
good post
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Old 01-03-2010, 02:12 PM
 
2,681 posts, read 3,575,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
everybody argues that the market will only charge what it can bear but thats crap because tell me why 3 bedroom apartments in my neighborhood are going for $1500 a month in some cases...
If people are renting them, then obviously someone is willing to pay that price. If I'm not mistaken, you're in Far Rock, which might still be recieveing a large Caribbean influx which drives up prices.

Immigrants tend to drive up rents becuase they're more willing than more naturalized Americans to share cramped quartiers. 5 Dominican or Chinese men sharing an apartment at $200 each equals $1000 a month. That's why even migrant hoods like the South Bronx, Western Queens and Southern Brooklyn are so expensive.

The fact is alot of people on this thread want what they want and feel the government is responsible to give them what they desire. I'm sure the same posters here who feel such simmering resentment against "the rich" are the same ones who activley support and partake in NYS massive social services offerings, which have to be paid for in tax money which largley comes down to "The Rich" to pay:

New York Mayor Bloomberg Says Liberal Tax Policies Will Lead To Nowhere Start Thinking Right

/\ As the article illustrates, the evil, no good, horrible, disgusting, rich pay for the services that NYers seem to crave and want.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,158 posts, read 32,695,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
If people are renting them, then obviously someone is willing to pay that price. If I'm not mistaken, you're in Far Rock, which might still be recieveing a large Caribbean influx which drives up prices.

Immigrants tend to drive up rents becuase they're more willing than more naturalized Americans to share cramped quartiers. 5 Dominican or Chinese men sharing an apartment at $200 each equals $1000 a month. That's why even migrant hoods like the South Bronx, Western Queens and Southern Brooklyn are so expensive.

The fact is alot of people on this thread want what they want and feel the government is responsible to give them what they desire. I'm sure the same posters here who feel such simmering resentment against "the rich" are the same ones who activley support and partake in NYS massive social services offerings, which have to be paid for in tax money which largley comes down to "The Rich" to pay:

New York Mayor Bloomberg Says Liberal Tax Policies Will Lead To Nowhere Start Thinking Right

/\ As the article illustrates, the evil, no good, horrible, disgusting, rich pay for the services that NYers seem to crave and want.
excuse my language, but if they have you by the balls, what else are u gonna do? its not that somebody is willing to pay, they have no choice.
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