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Old 10-14-2008, 03:24 PM
 
Location: bronx - north
473 posts, read 1,113,192 times
Reputation: 109
Default Violent crime on the rise in the Bronx

It's murder out there.
Just when you thought the Bronx was getting safer, violent crime is creeping back up.
In fact, the borough's crime numbers for the first nine months of this year are responsible for about a quarter of the city's surge in homicides and shootings...........

Violent crime on the rise in the Bronx again

I want to see the math/figures the NYPD used to compute this - that 9 months of BX crime, is responsible 25% of the city's homicide "surge." Where is the 75% coming from? There are 4 other boroughs and if all the boroughs contribute equally to the homicide "surge", then 25% is not that far from 20%. Maybe the article should have said "bx homicides are responsible for 25% of the city's homicide surge".
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Old 10-14-2008, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Morrisania, Bronx
731 posts, read 1,206,878 times
Reputation: 236
Oh no, here we go again. I hope the people of the Bronx hear this and begin to step up in order to fight back against this crime increase.
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,050 posts, read 11,112,917 times
Reputation: 1588
Thanks for the article.

The basic problem with the Bronx is that it has too many sketchy neighborhoods. The neighborhoods west of the Bronx River and south of Bedford Park BLVD are just plain awful. The areas around White Plains Road in the 200's are terrible. The western half of Soundview, closest to Hunts Point is crap. So off the bat, you have roughly half the borough with widespread poverty and a very high crime rate. Then you have the sketchy/declining neighborhoods of Bedford Park, Norwood, Parkchester, Bronx Park, Westchester Square, Co-op city and the areas around Allerton. All these neighborhoods have average to above average crime rate. So you can say that at least 75% of the borough has crime problems, although to different degrees. No other entire borough has a precentage this high. Only a relatively small part of Brooklyn has high crime...as does Queens and Manhattan. Staten Island is overwhelmingly "safe".

As to why the Bronx has seen such an uptick this year? Well, the blame can go to certain neighborhoods. Neighborhoods, in the 43rd (Soundview), 48th (East Tremont/West Farms), 42nd (Morrisania) and 44th (Highbridge, Concourse) have seen very large increases in homicides.
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Old 10-15-2008, 12:12 AM
 
242 posts, read 620,273 times
Reputation: 69
The problem is cops got in trouble for stop and frisk tactics, so they stopped stopping and frisking and the gangbangers start carrying guns again.
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Old 10-15-2008, 10:28 AM
 
3,225 posts, read 5,077,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jrock247 View Post
The problem is cops got in trouble for stop and frisk tactics, so they stopped stopping and frisking and the gangbangers start carrying guns again.
It's pretty tough policing against criminal activity in high crime areas.

When large segments of the population have the perception that cops are the enemy not their protector, that doesn't help - and I'm not asserting here that the perception is vaild or conjecturing as to the origin of such perecption.

When residents attempt to start their own neighborhood watch organizations, they then become scapegoated by the hoodlums in the neighborhood and put their lives at risk.

It surely is a pathetic situation and unfortunately the honest, hardworking, law abiding residents are the ones who suffer as their neighborhoods are held captive by gangs, drug lords, other criminals. And at the same time they are either afraid to approach law enforcement or feel that they will be adding another tier of victimization when they are caught in a crossfire.

No wonder all the criminologists, social scientists, lawyers, law enforcemnt officials, community organizers are at an impasse and are rendered impotent in solving these issues in projects and communities across America.
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Old 10-15-2008, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,060 posts, read 18,491,302 times
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The real basic problem, as always when someone starts quoting such statistics, is that you have to take percentages with a grain of salt. Maybe even with two grains of salt. How many crimes are being committed, and how many people live in the affected area? If there's a million and a half residents of The Bronx, and you're talking about 50 crimes, it's not quite the same thing as 50 crimes being committed in a town with 5,000 residents.
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Old 10-15-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
7,533 posts, read 12,737,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
The real basic problem, as always when someone starts quoting such statistics, is that you have to take percentages with a grain of salt. Maybe even with two grains of salt. How many crimes are being committed, and how many people live in the affected area? If there's a million and a half residents of The Bronx, and you're talking about 50 crimes, it's not quite the same thing as 50 crimes being committed in a town with 5,000 residents.
Agreed stats can be manipulated all kinds of ways.
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Old 10-15-2008, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
9,192 posts, read 14,485,619 times
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Yes, the statistics are not too meaningul, in an of themselves, but they do give an indication to the members of the law enforcement community as to where and why the crimes occurred. If it's an uptick in a specific type of crime that's segregated to a particular population, that's different than violent crime at large on the increase. And there are reasons for an anomaly when the prevailing trend is towards decreased levels of crime, but if the rate continues to increase (and is not manipulated by reporting tactics) it is indicative of a problem that needs to be addressed, lest the city be caught off-guard by an epidemic again.
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Old 10-15-2008, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
7,533 posts, read 12,737,425 times
Reputation: 2214
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwguydc View Post
Yes, the statistics are not too meaningul, in an of themselves, but they do give an indication to the members of the law enforcement community as to where and why the crimes occurred. If it's an uptick in a specific type of crime that's segregated to a particular population, that's different than violent crime at large on the increase. And there are reasons for an anomaly when the prevailing trend is towards decreased levels of crime, but if the rate continues to increase (and is not manipulated by reporting tactics) it is indicative of a problem that needs to be addressed, lest the city be caught off-guard by an epidemic again.
That's the thing, I think a lot of times people are too quick to see these type of reactionary headlines and then immediately start predicting a return to 1970's NYC or crack-era South Bronx.

The police department is well-aware of the problems and have had success dealing with other recent up-ticks in crime. Let's have a little faith in them.
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Old 10-15-2008, 01:10 PM
 
3,225 posts, read 5,077,805 times
Reputation: 842
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwguydc View Post
Yes, the statistics are not too meaningul, in an of themselves, but they do give an indication to the members of the law enforcement community as to where and why the crimes occurred. If it's an uptick in a specific type of crime that's segregated to a particular population, that's different than violent crime at large on the increase. And there are reasons for an anomaly when the prevailing trend is towards decreased levels of crime, but if the rate continues to increase (and is not manipulated by reporting tactics) it is indicative of a problem that needs to be addressed, lest the city be caught off-guard by an epidemic again.
Indeed. And while we may challenge the interpretation of stats in some instances, we must not add to an existing issue by shifting the focus from occurring problems by falsely disputing valid percentages. One can examine the numbers for faulty enumerations but if trends are showing an adverse situation, we must move beyond splitting hairs and be honest in how to address the legitimate issues.
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