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Old 01-29-2008, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
1,990 posts, read 6,846,704 times
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yeah. I hope that T line gets done fast. I took the 4 to The Bronx on Saturday, and that train was PACKED. The 2nd ave Subway would be heaven. Besides, the 4 stopped on 149th because of "construction". ~_~ I had to switch trains.
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Old 01-29-2008, 08:47 PM
 
Location: UWS -- Lucky Me!
757 posts, read 3,019,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliaw View Post
You think more bus service should be provided to the residents on the Upper East Side?
How? There are already too many buses, cars, trucks, taxis on the avenues of the East Side. More buses won't solve the problem, because they'd only compound traffic tie-ups and gridlock.

Quote:
Do you feel like a temporary relief system should go underway at the Lexington Avenue stop till the T line is completed?
The Lex already runs beyond capacity at rush hour. (The T Line is not a whim or a luxury. If it ever happens, it will be because there ain't no alternative no way, no how. How do you increase service on the Lex? Rush hour trains run almost end-on-end and are as long as stations allow (longer, even than some station platforms!). It is impossible to increase the number of cars or the frequency of service while maintaining a safe distance between one train and the train in front/back of it.

Quote:
What do you feel would be the best solution for residents living in the area that may be forced to relocate?
A fair buy-out or relocation at the Transit Authority's expense. Residents -- especially the infirm and elderly -- need to be taken care of. Businesses, however, may also need to relocate, and since some of them depend on years of neighborly relations, a lot of the entrepreneurs will probably chose to close shop and move (if they can) to Florida.

My suggestion, since you are not so far from New York, is to come spend a weekday, midday, on the platform of a Lexington Ave. Station and also to check out how traffic moves, say, along Second Ave. between 60th and 34th Streets. Maybe you'll even find some neighborhood residents to interview.
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Old 01-29-2008, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Queens
841 posts, read 3,931,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilkCity0416 View Post
yeah. I hope that T line gets done fast. I took the 4 to The Bronx on Saturday, and that train was PACKED. The 2nd ave Subway would be heaven. Besides, the 4 stopped on 149th because of "construction". ~_~ I had to switch trains.
Thats why I always wait at the very front or very back of the train.
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Old 01-29-2008, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 14,983,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbro View Post
The Lex already runs beyond capacity at rush hour. (The T Line is not a whim or a luxury. If it ever happens, it will be because there ain't no alternative no way, no how. How do you increase service on the Lex? Rush hour trains run almost end-on-end and are as long as stations allow (longer, even than some station platforms!). It is impossible to increase the number of cars or the frequency of service while maintaining a safe distance between one train and the train in front/back of it.
From what I understand the switching system for nearly the entire subway is completely out of date. If they updated the system a little bit, and installed a modern switching system they could probably squeeze on a few more trains per hour.

However in the end that's a fools game, since the number of people using the Lexington Ave is constantly growing. The only real solution is for the MTA to hurry up and finish the 2nd ave subway.

As a side note, I'd just like to point out that the historical reality of tearing down 2 Els (the 2nd ave, and 3rd ave) prior to completing the 2nd ave subway was a horrible mistake, which the MTA must never repeat. There wouldn't be nearly such a congestion problem if either one of the 2 Els was still operating, no matter how ugly they might have been.
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Old 03-25-2012, 07:56 PM
 
5 posts, read 6,705 times
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I'm looking at an apartment on East 69th between First and Second and was wondering if anyone could speak of recent experiences (past year) living a little off Second Avenue as opposed to right on Second Avenue.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:35 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,899 posts, read 8,321,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliaw View Post
Hi, my name is Natalia. I am a student at Rutgers University where I am taking a class at my school called Scientific and Technical Writing where we need to find one particular problem in the area and submit a 30 page project proposal at the end of the semester that should involve helping a specific population. An issue of my interest is the construction of the 2nd avenue subway.

The building of the 2nd avenue subway, or the "T" line as they will call it is planned to be started this year, and hopefully be completed by 2025-2030. It was recommended as a course of action to reduce overcrowding and delays on the Lexington Avenue line and to improve transit accessibility for residents on the Far East Side of Manhattan. A concern however of the MTA is the probable relocation of residents where the subway would be built as well as the closing down of various businesses.

Please, anybody living in the area or knows someone in the area, let me know how you feel about this situation and what you think is the best solution. You think more bus service should be provided to the residents on the Upper East Side? Do you feel like a temporary relief system should go underway at the Lexington Avenue stop till the T line is completed? What do you feel would be the best solution for residents living in the area that may be forced to relocate? You can write anything on your mind. It will be greatly appreciated and you will help me so much for my class.

Thank you!

Natalia
The first thing that s/h been realized in this proposed thesis is the fat and reality that the constuction of the subway line is not intended for the sole purpose nor benefit of the residents of the upper east side, BUT rather the intention and purpose is to provide greater access to the upper east side for the entire FIVE BOROUGHS and beyond!

Consequently, questions s/n be exclusive to the residents of the upper east side, as the interests are not exclusive.

Just a matter of fact....
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Old 03-25-2012, 09:05 PM
 
215 posts, read 458,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iranon View Post
I'm looking at an apartment on East 69th between First and Second and was wondering if anyone could speak of recent experiences (past year) living a little off Second Avenue as opposed to right on Second Avenue.
I live between 1st and 2nd avenues on East 78th Street. No problems with construction noise whatsoever. But I am much closer to First Ave than to Second Ave.

You might experience more noise because there is a lot of work going on Second Ave between 73rd and 69th streets.
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Old 03-25-2012, 10:44 PM
 
9,340 posts, read 13,892,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ontheroad View Post
The tracks, I learned, connecting the various lines, those with names I can hardly remember-BMT, IRT and IND--but still bear some smudged signage at subway stations (see 14th Street at the Park) are not the same width--so the 3 original lines can't connect. - one of the millions of reasons given, time and again, for the failure to complete the 2nd Avenue subway and/or to upgrade the entire system.
BMT and IND are the same width. IRT has the same width track (they're all standard gauge) but narrower tunnels. The 2nd Avenue Subway was originally IND so it was always slated to be the wider width. I'm not sure how that fits in with the delays, but any excuse will do, I suppose.
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:48 AM
 
457 posts, read 512,357 times
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Prepare for a rent increase with your new subway line. I guess there are more buildings to be created along the UES.
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,183 posts, read 26,506,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iranon View Post
I'm looking at an apartment on East 69th between First and Second and was wondering if anyone could speak of recent experiences (past year) living a little off Second Avenue as opposed to right on Second Avenue.



That neighborhoood is very desirable.
Yes the SAS constructionis a BIG pain in the ass...I'm a block West and a mile North and every time I walk Second Avenue the circuitous route through the construction has changed yet again and some of the sidewalks have all but disappeared into a single path. I sympathize with the retail operations that must be taking an immense hit. When I walk I try to make it along Third or Lex.

The biggest effect is that I cannot open my windows without having to wash the floor and sills afterwards...the dirt is copious. (I should check the crud condition of the air conditioner condenser coils before the cooling season begins.)
Keeping windows closed cuts down on the noise also.

It's a mess, no doubt about it. I just hope that we live long enough to get the eventual benefit.
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