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Old 02-20-2007, 12:16 PM
 
1 posts, read 14,398 times
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Hey everyone! Alright so here's my situation. My best friend and I are currently apartment hunting- EVERYWHERE! We've realized Brooklyn is the SH*T but we need some help narrowing it down. We are both in are young
20's, young professionals I work @ a Talent Agency and my friend (how cliche) is a struggling Actor. We work in Chelsea and the West Village. We know if we're going to move somewhere in Brooklyn we need it to be accessible by one subway line. We both work late hours and don't want to deal with taking two late running subways after a long night working or after a long night drinking (most of the time both!) So where we live we would like it to be only a few blocks from the # 2/3 lines. (And by few i mean 2 or 3 blocks!!!) We're looking to spend anywhere from $1500 to $2000 a month for a two bedroom. Honestly are only requirements is that the area is safe (feel comfortable walking home late @ night alone) very accessible by subway, and the apartment not 2 be a closet. We like our living space- that's why we're choosing Brooklyn!

From doing some research I'm hearing Park Slope (Which they have a few gay bars so that's cool), Williamsburg, (although i'm hearing just as expensive) or Prospect Heights (which I know nothing about)!!

So any locals out there have any advice!!

Sincerley,
---Young & Optimistic!!
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Old 02-20-2007, 08:53 PM
 
100 posts, read 584,078 times
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Whoa ultimate hipsters....

I think Williamsburg is good for you...please look at prices before you write it off completely because I have heard good deals in Williamsburg.

Also check out Carroll Gardents which is next to Park Slope.
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Old 02-23-2007, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Pawleys Island, SC
1,696 posts, read 8,137,124 times
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I like Carrol Gardens alot, it is much more quiet (safer) than some of the other places. You will have to change subways though as the F train is the only one that runs through there, unless you decide to walk from 6th Ave instead of 7th. I'm not sure on prices though. Have you considered Brooklyn Heights? I know it used to be kinda expensive but it is a nice neighborhood with alot of transportation options.
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Old 02-23-2007, 06:14 PM
 
122 posts, read 745,405 times
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Default 2/3 line

Definitely look into: Red Hook, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East NY, Brownsville, and Flatbush areas.

hahahahahah...just kidding!!

Park Slope and Brooklyn Heights are both near the 2/3 lines. Look around the Atlantic/Pacific Ave. stop--tons of trains stop there (including the LIRR). You might have trouble finding a 2-bdrm in your price range, though, esp. a large one. Another neighborhood that I know of near the 2/3 line is Midwood, by Brooklyn College. It's probably cheaper there than those other places mentioned above [seen 1-bdrms below 1,000]. It's at the END of the line but a ride into Manhattan is likely to be less than 1 hour. That station is on a VERY busy, noisy street (which in my opinion works to the advantage of a single female concerned about safety) but w/in walking distance from a much quieter area with big, pretty houses populated largely by wealthy Orthodox Jews. More restaurants around there than you'll know what to do with, too. However, you'd be pretty far from your friends who aren't on the 2/3 line.

I don't believe the 2/3 stops anywhere near Williamsburg. But I could be wrong.

You can try the A-line; I think the area around High St. is sposed to be "up and coming" (ugh) if it isn't already in full hipstery swing. I believe the A transfers to the 2/3 somewhere. Speaking of which, you're probably doing yourself a disservice by limiting your search to a neighborhood from which you'd only have to take 1 train to work. Lots and lots of people transfer trains while commuting; it's a way of life here, and what with all the random construction they love to do on nights and weekends you might find yourself having to take more than 1 train anyway.

Last edited by woofenstein; 02-23-2007 at 06:26 PM..
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Old 02-26-2007, 08:10 AM
 
7 posts, read 25,073 times
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I suggest that you find out the true boundaries of both Williamsburg and Park Slope. I used to live in Park Slope and one thing I noticed was that people really liked expanding the boundaries by a good 10 blocks. I know the same thing happens with Williamsburg. You can go check out the areas for yourselves though since you're already in the city, which is a huge bonus. As someone said above, I don't believe the 2/3 runs through Williamsburg at all and it doesn't run through actual Park Slope. Check out places around Grand Army Plaza. For your price range and desire for space, I think Prospect Heights and Williamsburg will be your best bets. You'll be hard pressed to find a decent sized 2br in Brooklyn Heights for under 2K. Park Slope is a possibility and an awesome neighborhood, so if you can find something off 7th Ave and can tolerate the F train, I'd suggest that.
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Old 03-07-2007, 07:40 PM
 
48 posts, read 444,408 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by woofenstein View Post
Definitely look into: Red Hook, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East NY, Brownsville, and Flatbush areas.

hahahahahah...just kidding!!

One might say why I'm I cutting and pasting articles. Well the only way to fight ignorance and hatred is through FACTS. Read on

Beginning in the late 1980s, the neighborhood began to experience a renaissance which continues to the present day. One significant reason for this has been the decrease of crime in the neighborhood, which is at least partly attributable to the decline of the national Crack Epidemic in the late 1980s. Despite the gradual improvement and increased stability of the community, Bedford-Stuyvesant has continued to be stigmatized by the public's negative perception. A campaign was launched in March 2005 to supplant the "Bed-Stuy, Do-or-Die" image in the public consciousness with the more positive "Bed-Stuy, and Proud of It". Through a series of "wallscapes" (large outdoor murals), the campaign hopes to honor famous community members, including community activist and poet June Jordan, activist Hattie Carthan, rapper and actor Mos Def, and actor and comedian Chris Rock. (Daily News, March 5, 2005)

The revitalization and renewal of Bedford-Stuyvesant has prompted an increasingly diverse range of people to seek affordable housing among the many blocks of handsome brownstone rowhouses. As is expected with gentrification, the influx of new residents has probably contributed to the displacement of poorer residents, but in many other cases, newcomers have rehabilitated and reoccupied formerly vacant and abandoned properties.

As a result, Bedford-Stuyvesant is becoming increasingly racially and ethnically diverse. The Hispanic population has increased along with the white population. An article in the April 2005 issue of Time Out New York, "The Battle for Bed-Stuy," chronicled the increasing numbers of blacks moving in. Many long-time residents and business owners are worried they will be priced out by newcomer "yuppies or buppies," and that the neighborhood's ethnic character will be lost. Others say gentrification is spreading because of the appeal of the brownstone homes that are numerous in Bedford-Stuyvesant. However, a 70% black population does remain; Bedford-Stuyvesant's population has experienced less displacement of poor African-Americans than other areas of Brooklyn, such as Cobble Hill. There are efforts to stop the gentrifying of Bedford-Stuyvesant. Still, it is argued by some that gentrification and neighborhood change will improve neighborhood safety and create demand for improved retail services along the major commercial strips, such as Fulton Street, Nostrand Avenue, Tompkins Avenue,Greene Avenue, Lewis Avenue, Flushing Avenue, Park Avenue, Myrtle Avenue, Dekalb Avenue, Putnam Avenue, Bedford Avenue, Marcy Avenue, Malcolm X Boulevard, Gates Avenue, Madison Avenue, and Jefferson Avenue.

In July 2005, the New York City Police Department designated the Fulton Street-Nostrand Avenue business district in Bedford-Stuyvesant as an "Impact Zone." The designation directed significantly increased levels of police protection and resources to the area centered on the intersection of Fulton Street and Nostrand Avenue for a period of six months. Since the start of the Impact Zone in Bedford-Stuyvesant, crime within the district decreased 15% from the previous year. The Impact Zone was renewed for another six-month period in December 2005.
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Old 03-07-2007, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Pawleys Island, SC
1,696 posts, read 8,137,124 times
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Default No hatred here

As a recently retired NYC cop I can tell you that "Impact Zones" were established to combat high crime areas. They flood an area with cops and naturally crime is going to be displaced and result in a reduction in crime for that targeted area. Is Bed-Stuy better today than it was 10-15 years ago, absolutely. Is it still one of the top crime areas in the city, yes. So when someone comes on this board and asks for opnions you have to take them with a grain of salt. AmbitiousBohemian asked for someplace safe... I can think of dozens of safer places than Bed-Stuy. No one said places that are more white, less black, more purple, less green. She asked about safe.

I am tired of people who are so over sensitive that they take things out of perspective. I am also concerned about the folks out there who are truly racist, but those are people who you cannot change. They were raised that way and have biased notions imbedded in their thought process. Everyone has prejudices, but in order to maintain a civilization we need to keep them in check, and try to teach our children to have an open mind.
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Old 03-08-2007, 01:28 PM
 
122 posts, read 745,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theanswer View Post
One might say why I'm I cutting and pasting articles. Well the only way to fight ignorance and hatred is through FACTS. Read on
Ignorance and HATRED?! Listen, I'm from near-Flatbush (Church Ave.) and have lived in the S. Bronx, and I'm Dominican. Both halves. I am NOT filled with hatred, self- or otherwise. And I am NOT ignorant. The reason I joked that way was because I was poking fun at how people (especially young Caucasian ones) who decide to move to the city, esp. Brooklyn, tend to gravitate to the standard areas and would probably avoid the areas I mentioned like the plague. Sorry if that's funny to me. With the exception of East NY and Brownsville, which I've only been to a handful of times, I feel alright walking in all those neighborhoods alone at night, and have done so, because I'm not an idiot. I would prefer trekking to Bed-Stuy than Williamsburg, which *I* in turn avoid like the plague. Even though I'm in my 20's and would be expected to love it.

Maybe you found my joke mean, but lighten up, and stop assuming that people who don't follow your ultra-sensitive guidelines are hate-mongers. And try and remember that having this discussion in the first place is better than staying "PC" and shutting up.

Last edited by woofenstein; 03-08-2007 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 03-08-2007, 07:10 PM
 
48 posts, read 444,408 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by baylovers View Post
As a recently retired NYC cop I can tell you that "Impact Zones" were established to combat high crime areas. They flood an area with cops and naturally crime is going to be displaced and result in a reduction in crime for that targeted area.

In accordance with this logic, Times Square is the most dangerous place on this planet. It's a perpetual Impact Zone.
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Old 03-08-2007, 07:32 PM
 
48 posts, read 444,408 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmbitiousBohemian View Post
Hey everyone! Alright so here's my situation. My best friend and I are currently apartment hunting- EVERYWHERE! We've realized Brooklyn is the SH*T but we need some help narrowing it down. We are both in are young
20's, young professionals I work @ a Talent Agency and my friend (how cliche) is a struggling Actor. We work in Chelsea and the West Village. We know if we're going to move somewhere in Brooklyn we need it to be accessible by one subway line. We both work late hours and don't want to deal with taking two late running subways after a long night working or after a long night drinking (most of the time both!) So where we live we would like it to be only a few blocks from the # 2/3 lines. (And by few i mean 2 or 3 blocks!!!) We're looking to spend anywhere from $1500 to $2000 a month for a two bedroom. Honestly are only requirements is that the area is safe (feel comfortable walking home late @ night alone) very accessible by subway, and the apartment not 2 be a closet. We like our living space- that's why we're choosing Brooklyn!

From doing some research I'm hearing Park Slope (Which they have a few gay bars so that's cool), Williamsburg, (although i'm hearing just as expensive) or Prospect Heights (which I know nothing about)!!

So any locals out there have any advice!!

Sincerley,
---Young & Optimistic!!

If you move to Flatbush this is what you'll get yourself to. So stay away. read on.
When Brooklyn Properties broker Hal Lehrman drives clients to the Ditmas Park area, their faces invariably drop as he turns off Prospect Park West and heads down to Coney Island Avenue, a grim commercial street lined with storefronts like Magic Touch Auto and Mr. Tires & Garage. At that moment, Lehrman pops the pre-cued soundtrack to 2001: A Space Odyssey into his cassette deck. With Strauss's "Thus Spake Zarathustra" blaring, he turns off the avenue into Ditmas Park and watches the prospective house hunters' eyes light up at the sight of block after leafy block of century-old Victorians with large lots, manicured lawns, and tree-lined streets with pedigreed English names like Argyle, Rugby, and Marlborough.



The Numbers

Ditmas Park: $400K-$650K

Ditmas Park West: $400K-$550K

Midwood Terrace: $375K-$575K

Thanks to Park Slope's explosive growth in the past decade, and because of an aging population that is gradually selling out to younger home buyers, the Ditmas Park area is back on the map for bargain-hunting Manhattan exiles. Alison Bagnall, 36, moved to Prospect Park South last year from the East Village. She and her husband split the cost of a $675,000 1910 Victorian with her parents, who live on the first floor but travel frequently. It sounds expensive until you consider the number of bedrooms: nine. The extra rooms double as home offices since she and her husband are freelancers (she co-wrote the 1998 hit indie film Buffalo '66). She marvels that their half of the house cost about the same as their one-bedroom condo in the East Village. "All of these houses here were built for wealthy people," she says, citing former area residents like the Guggenheims. "But now you don't have to be really wealthy to live in them."

Sample Listing: 522 RUGBY ROAD. Five-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath Victorian on a spacious 40-by-100-foot lot. Parquet floors and large eat-in kitchen. Sold in August for $562,000

Once upon a time The area was farmland until just over a century ago, when Brooklyn was incorporated into New York City and the subway arrived. Developers descended, and some of the city's ruling class (like the Guggenheims and Gillettes) made their homes here. But real-estate values declined along with Flatbush's reputation in the seventies and eighties.

Prime area The Victorian homes in Prospect Park South are by far the grandest in the area. (Lots can run up to 200 feet deep.) Colonial Revivals, Tudors, Federal-style, Japanese, and even Swiss Chalet-style homes add to the architectural diversity.

The cons What's missing is desirable restaurants and a wide selection of retail services. Most residents drive into nearby Park Slope to drop off their dry cleaning or get takeout dinners. Some residents are taking matters into their own hands and pooling money (for a loan) to lure an established restaurateur to Ditmas Park.

The commute Thirty to 40 minutes to midtown on the Q line (or, once service is restored, the D line).

Schools P.S. 139 is a highly regarded, highly diverse grammar school. One of the few in the area that is not overcrowded. Nearby Midwood High School is considered one of the city's best and can be very difficult to get into.
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