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Old 11-28-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
1,961 posts, read 4,158,102 times
Reputation: 1174

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilkCity0416 View Post
the best paying jobs should be cops and firefighters.

It should be but it's not.
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Old 11-28-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: NYC by week; ATL by weekend
971 posts, read 1,465,627 times
Reputation: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
Not sure if you have ever read any of his interviews or watched his show, I prefer the thoughts of Gene Simmonds of Kiss. He has ammased a large fortune and informs the world that it is good to be him. Simmonds states that it is better to be rich. More poor people commit crimes than those that have money. Sure the rich have their share of criminals but gennerally speaking the majority of criminals are poor. People that have money are more equipped to take care of themselves in every aspect of life. The rich have less stressfull lives than the poor. Lets see is it more stressfull to make that million dollar sale, or wonder where you will get the money to pay the rent or putt food on the table. I bet the person making that big sale will be eating well and have a nice place to live. Got to hand it to Mr. Simmonds.
Just my .02 cents.....I whoe heartedly disagree with the above summarization of what Gene Simmonds stated. There is just about as much white collar crime as blue collar crime. Just because you are a yuppie does not make it any bettere/worse. I was brought up in a single parent home VERY unfortunate...but through sheer drive and hustle have gotten to a comfortable place. And I am still young. But to say that "Rich" people have better lives is complete B.S.....Anyone who has been broke AND had money know that money can solve some problems....but it aint the big fix some people make it out to be. I do what I like, I get paid O.K. for it, I have traveled and lived the way I envisioned and I am far from rich. Its all about mindsets people....I would so rather do what I like and be less stressed in life and make o.k. money than be like the CEO of my company telling us all in private that he is losing his mind....to each their own. But I'll take the less stressful road.
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Old 11-28-2011, 11:14 AM
 
Location: NYC by week; ATL by weekend
971 posts, read 1,465,627 times
Reputation: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biskit View Post
Why does anyone need that much money though? Once you make about $60,000 you'll be comfortable for a single person in NY. $100,000 - $150,000 for a single person or twice that for a family is more than enough money, and most jobs at the senior managerial level pay at least that in NYC. When I was making $60K I was living it up, had a nice big apartment in Astoria to myself, traveling the world, buying clothes and entertainment all the time and eating well. I'd rather get a job that I actually enjoy doing that doesn't involve that much time commitment and stress and be making between 100-200K than working 80 hour weeks doing boring work to make 250k plus. For example, I have sub contractors at the consulting company that I work for that make $220K a year, only work 40 hours a week from Mon-Thurs, and can take as much time as they want between projects. They have little or no stress compared to Bankers who work 100 hour weeks in a stressful, competitive environment for less (per hour). If you really enjoy this type of work, that's a different story. I'd rather be a baseball player or actor or painter or DJ or something that i'm truly passionate about and make less.
True that!....I did the same during my time in NYC....nothing dazzles the yuppies than wondering what you do and where you went to school because you live close to uptown and have a waaay better apartment than them, dress as well and can afford to have a CAR!!!!!....
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:28 AM
 
2,337 posts, read 3,324,194 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Doctors/Medical jobs(Not every job but plenty of jobs)
Lawyers
Finance(Such as the ones that work for Wall Street, Accountants, etc)
Science/technology jobs(Not all of them but plenty of them)
Architecture jobs(Not all of them but plenty of them)
Executives for different companies(CEOs/President/VP)
Store managers/owners for the most successful businesses
Landlords for buildings/houses.
Real estate agents
Journalists/People that work in the media field(The types that work for CNN, NBC, news stations like that etc. as well as newspapers such as The New York Times)


New York City wouldn't have such a high cost of living in certain neighborhoods if there weren't plenty of high salary career opportunities.
No one mentioned digital/internet industry. Typically you think of Cali for these jobs but NYC has a pretty decent sized "silicon alley". If you don't have the degree for the tech side of digital, sales within this industry pays well as the roles tend to all offer a solid base salary (usually $70K- $120K) + commission (often double base). However, as with most industries, it's not the easiest to get into without a background in [new/digital] media and/or sales.
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Old 05-18-2012, 09:50 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
6,881 posts, read 3,613,112 times
Reputation: 4049
Mutual fund manager. You can assemble a portfolio by throwing darts at the stock tables, thus approximating the return of the S&P 500, and makes tons of money. Nice "work" if you can get it.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:10 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,724 posts, read 2,864,188 times
Reputation: 4685
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
According to the NY Times, the median annual income for the parents of white Manhattan toddlers was $284,000. Does someone know what kind of jobs pay this kind of money, and what are the qualifications? My husband is looking for a career change and I want to suggest that he go for the money. Has anyone ever been to a career counselor in the city?
If you're aiming for this median salary, IT isn't where you want to be. While there are probably IT people working for Goldman making 400k, I would think your average IT income plateaus out at around 120-150k. Get into finance or become a doctor if you want to pull in anything above 300k.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:47 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,621,992 times
Reputation: 14671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adhom View Post
If you're aiming for this median salary, IT isn't where you want to be. While there are probably IT people working for Goldman making 400k, I would think your average IT income plateaus out at around 120-150k. Get into finance or become a doctor if you want to pull in anything above 300k.
Median income is for both parents. Two parents in IT could potentially be close to 280k/ year combined.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:49 PM
 
2,591 posts, read 3,374,308 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by r small View Post
Mutual fund manager. You can assemble a portfolio by throwing darts at the stock tables, thus approximating the return of the S&P 500, and makes tons of money. Nice "work" if you can get it.
Thanks for the advice. I've heard that mutual fund managers tend not to predict the market better than anyone else, despite the hefty salary. I think that this work requires a Masters in finance generally?
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:58 PM
 
2,591 posts, read 3,374,308 times
Reputation: 1293
Thanks for whoever bumped the thread. I had forgotten about it and it's helpful to read through the advice again. The situation is still the same for us after all this time. My husband is back doing sales - he's very good at it but would like to make more money. I guess he'd like to stay in sales but with a better salary. Maybe pharmaceutical sales.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:35 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
77 posts, read 127,264 times
Reputation: 65
On the subject of lawyers: If you go to a good school (T14) and land biglaw, you'd be making 160k + bonuses your first year as an associate at a big firm in NYC.

Current lockstep compensation (including bonuses, which many feel are unjustly small compared to partner compensation) is:
1st year: 167.5k
2nd year: 180k
3rd year: 200k
4th year: 230k
5th year: 255k

It continues to climb after this, but most lawyers leave biglaw somewhere between years 3 and 5 (if you happen to make partner --which, in part, depends on how highly leveraged the firm is -- then the pay increases even further). At this point, desirable exit options begin to open, e.g., lateraling to a medium/small firm, going into federal government, going in-house, etc. Robert Half Legal provides pretty good numbers for in-house pay (the majority of in-house lawyers come from corporate law, but a small subset of these positions can be had through litigation experience as well): w/ 4-9 years experience the 25-50-75 is 136k-197k-259k, w/ 10-12 years experience, the 25-50-75 is 184k-251k-318k. Federal government positions are going to be capped somewhere in the 125-150k range (you can easily look this up), but they provide great benefits.

Caveats, biglaw requires really long hours (60-70+ a week and always on call), is extremely difficult to get (you have to get into a T14 school to even have a coin-flip's chance of getting it), and often requires an individual to take on massive debtload (think 150-250k in debt upon graduation of law school).
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