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Old 06-29-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: suburbs of NYC en route to southern Illinois
187 posts, read 36,726 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
OK all you long time New Yorkers, let's hear it. Lately I've been watching reruns of "All in the Family." Archie and Edith represent the "old guard" and have what I estimate to be exaggerated New York accent that has since faded a bit. But one linguistic habit of theirs I find curious is their propensity to pronounce the "oi" sound as "er" so "toilet" becomes "terlet" and "spoiled" becomes "sperled" and so forth.
haha my mom who grew up in Bed Stuy in the 50s and 60s jokingly uses an exaggeration of that old Brooklyn Italian accent often, she actually will say "I need to use the TERlet" or "you're so SPERled" as a referential joke. And her and her sister whose names both have As in them...forget about it

This used to be more common for some reason, in distinct ethnic enclaves, but things are more diverse now so I think a result is accents are less distinct overall (there are still some places which are exceptions, like Staten Island and Bay Ridge).
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Old 06-29-2010, 10:02 PM
 
Location: New York City
218 posts, read 467,851 times
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We have a close family friend who used to be a secretary in a NYC office building in the 50's, and she said that back then a lot of her female co-workers would talk with a heavy NYC accent, like saying the word "shirt" as "shoyt", or "knock" as "nawk".

It's funny seeing the various accents from back east... my father is from Maine, and they saw "water" like "worter", but a New Yorker would say "wahta".
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Old 06-30-2010, 12:39 AM
 
Location: North shore, Long Island
1,919 posts, read 2,951,575 times
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My father was born in 1940, grew up in Brownsville and strangely enough my fondest memory of him was being in a gang. He said back in the 50's "every yoot in Brooklyn was in a gang" also, pronouncing toilet, "terlet."
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Old 06-30-2010, 12:51 AM
 
Location: North shore, Long Island
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Bobby Flay has the modern version of the accent? Come to Long Island, when I first heard Chef speak I thought he was from the Island. Makes sense because most Long Islanders are the kids or grandkids of Brooklynites.
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Old 06-30-2010, 05:32 AM
 
4,502 posts, read 7,625,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1nevets View Post
Bobby Flay has the modern version of the accent? Come to Long Island, when I first heard Chef speak I thought he was from the Island. Makes sense because most Long Islanders are the kids or grandkids of Brooklynites.
Weird, though, the way most LI-ers speak....

saw = sawr as in "I sawr her yesterday

Americer = America as in "I bank at Bank of Americer"


Why do they put an "r" on the end?
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Old 06-30-2010, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,060 posts, read 18,934,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
OK all you long time New Yorkers, let's hear it. Lately I've been watching reruns of "All in the Family." Archie and Edith represent the "old guard" and have what I estimate to be exaggerated New York accent that has since faded a bit.
Not exaggerated at all. Archie Bunker may have lived on (fictitious) Hauser Street in Queens, but he spoke with a definite Greenpoint accent--known for transposing "er" and "oi."
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Old 06-30-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
11,994 posts, read 10,817,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
OK all you long time New Yorkers, let's hear it. Lately I've been watching reruns of "All in the Family." Archie and Edith represent the "old guard" and have what I estimate to be exaggerated New York accent that has since faded a bit. But one linguistic habit of theirs I find curious is their propensity to pronounce the "oi" sound as "er" so "toilet" becomes "terlet" and "spoiled" becomes "sperled" and so forth. I have never heard this anywhere else except on "All in the Family." Was this ever a common feature of the New York accent or of some localized version of it? Or was this just some weird affectation they added on the show?

Oh, does anyone else find it strange that other than those two, the character with the thickest New York accent is Meathead even though he's supposedly from Chicago?
yes, it is a true accent. I have living proof relatives including myself that say terlet sorry, but we do.
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Old 06-30-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
11,994 posts, read 10,817,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
You can still hear it in parts of Brooklyn,like Bensonhoist, if you are lucky.Thankfully,it hasn't disappeared completely.
Th UR and the OI are switched.Hurst becomes hoist and oil becomes url.
Language peculiarities are often double faced.In Boston,they drop R's where they are supposed to be and put in R's where they are not supposed to be.
oh yeah, I forgot about the erl,

Like I will tell the waitress I will have vinegar and erl in my salad and she has no clue, I just laugh. LOl

or on the beach we use baby erl and iodine. yup, I am a die hard brooklynite, and i am older than dirt. LOL
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Old 06-30-2010, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL USA
2,451 posts, read 3,024,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
OK all you long time New Yorkers, let's hear it. Lately I've been watching reruns of "All in the Family." Archie and Edith represent the "old guard" and have what I estimate to be exaggerated New York accent that has since faded a bit. But one linguistic habit of theirs I find curious is their propensity to pronounce the "oi" sound as "er" so "toilet" becomes "terlet" and "spoiled" becomes "sperled" and so forth. I have never heard this anywhere else except on "All in the Family." Was this ever a common feature of the New York accent or of some localized version of it? Or was this just some weird affectation they added on the show?
Not a longtime New Yorker here -- in fact, I've never lived there -- but IIRC Archie and Edith were originally from New Jersey and so they spoke with what is supposed to be a Jersey accent. I think they moved to Queens so Archie could be closer to his job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Oh, does anyone else find it strange that other than those two, the character with the thickest New York accent is Meathead even though he's supposedly from Chicago?
Yeah, I've noticed that too and found it amusing. It appears television just wasn't very realistic with stuff like that in those days. Look at "Laverne and Shirley", for example -- they all were supposed to be native to Milwaukee and yet they spoke with New York accents.
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Old 07-04-2010, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
141 posts, read 183,988 times
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YouTube - If These Knishes Could Talk: The Story of the New York Accent
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