U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-28-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Illinois
58 posts, read 149,514 times
Reputation: 21

Advertisements

Hey, everyone. I have some questions about possibly making the move to the Big Apple in the summer of 2010 just for a few years. I am a single, 22-year old female from rural Il (600 ppl) and in need of advice from resident New Yorkers. I could live in Chicago for the city feel, but it is just too close to home (two hours).

Iím graduating with a degree in high school/middle school science education and looking to break out of my corn field bubble. I want to live some place completely different and try something new while Iím still young. I would like to spend no more than 1200 per month for a studio apartment, but I am willing to have roommates. I do know one person I MIGHT room with, but I donít want to be a burden to this person since it is my decision to move to the city.

Questions:

1. Where are some ideal (ďsafeĒ I know itís a city but I will be moving by myself) places to live if you want to meet people, have close access to the subway (Iím not bringing my car), and general shopping?
2. Any good roommate and/or apartment finding sites?
3. Does anyone know about high school teaching opportunities? Are there any schools that are absolutely a death wish and should be avoided? I donít mind teaching in poorer neighborhoods or troubled youth but I will be fresh meat.
4. I live elsewhere and commute in with few problems? I know public transportation is king in NYC but I know some place have less access to the subways.
5. Any suggest from NYC teachers or friends of teachers? I know teachers donít make much, but itís just me and Iím not looking to save much. I just want the experience.
6. From what Iíve read on this site, Manhattan and Queens sound nice. What about Brooklyn?
7. Has anyone else made the move from small town or in my case microscopic town to the biggest city in the U.S.?
8. Any other tips or hints?

Thanks in advance!
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-29-2009, 12:30 AM
 
11,151 posts, read 14,115,713 times
Reputation: 18795
As a new teacher, don't be surprised if the only jobs you can find are in the poorer areas of the city. Jobs in the "nicer" schools don't come available that often, and when they do, they're snapped up by veteran teachers. The current salary schedule, which is good through October of 2009, says that beginning teachers (with a B.A.) start off at $45,530/year. That doesn't go terribly far in the city and, honestly, really isn't enough to allow you to live on your own in Manhattan. You can find a roommate (or two), or you can live in one of the other boroughs. Since you probably wouldn't be working in Manhattan, you'd do better to find a place closer to your school anyway.

All the other boroughs have nice areas, as well as some not-so-nice areas. You can get lots of good advice here about different neighborhoods, and a good suggestion is to browse Craigslist and then ask here about specific locations that you find there.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2009, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,192,691 times
Reputation: 1819
There's a hiring freeze in NYC public schools. The department of ed isn't hiring anyone new, unfortunately. I work in the south Bronx (most brand new teachers have to start out in rough areas), and there are people trying to break through in our school in a bad area. You would need to find a job in a private school or catholic school. But they make quite a bit less than public school teachers.

Don't move until you have a job!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2009, 03:51 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,924 posts, read 23,494,618 times
Reputation: 11522
A lot of what you're asking about is ultimately dependent on your job.

As far as things that I can answer:
- there are many good neighborhoods where you can pay less than 1200 a month, especially if you're willing to have
- I found stuff off of craigslist, and it works well provided you actually think about what you want and really visit and inspect the places
- much of Brooklyn is great, especially the areas to the north and west of Prospect Park. In fact, that area has some of the most desirable neighborhoods outside of Manhattan
- if you're really good with math and sciences, the going rate for tutoring high-achieving high school and college students for the SAT IIs and AP tests is pretty damn good--lowest is something like 50/hr, but the rates go to about eight times that. It takes time and effort to find these gigs, but they are great ways to supplement your income
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2009, 04:35 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,954,506 times
Reputation: 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABiologyTeacher View Post
Hey, everyone. I have some questions about possibly making the move to the Big Apple in the summer of 2010 just for a few years. I am a single, 22-year old female from rural Il (600 ppl) and in need of advice from resident New Yorkers. I could live in Chicago for the city feel, but it is just too close to home (two hours).

Iím graduating with a degree in high school/middle school science education and looking to break out of my corn field bubble. I want to live some place completely different and try something new while Iím still young. I would like to spend no more than 1200 per month for a studio apartment, but I am willing to have roommates. I do know one person I MIGHT room with, but I donít want to be a burden to this person since it is my decision to move to the city.

Questions:

1. Where are some ideal (ďsafeĒ I know itís a city but I will be moving by myself) places to live if you want to meet people, have close access to the subway (Iím not bringing my car), and general shopping?
2. Any good roommate and/or apartment finding sites?
3. Does anyone know about high school teaching opportunities? Are there any schools that are absolutely a death wish and should be avoided? I donít mind teaching in poorer neighborhoods or troubled youth but I will be fresh meat.
4. I live elsewhere and commute in with few problems? I know public transportation is king in NYC but I know some place have less access to the subways.
5. Any suggest from NYC teachers or friends of teachers? I know teachers donít make much, but itís just me and Iím not looking to save much. I just want the experience.
6. From what Iíve read on this site, Manhattan and Queens sound nice. What about Brooklyn?
7. Has anyone else made the move from small town or in my case microscopic town to the biggest city in the U.S.?
8. Any other tips or hints?

Thanks in advance!
I suggest reconsidering Chicago if you have more "hooks" there. The 2 hours isn't a good enough reason to avoid this city if you can find a job quicker, or you know a place to rent. Also knowing people who can help at the beginning is a bonus. In todays economy don't get stuck on NYC, but go where its easier to start. Just my 2 cents.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2009, 04:53 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,924 posts, read 23,494,618 times
Reputation: 11522
Though, of course, it's good your doing some legwork now. Who knows what things'll be like a year from now.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2009, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Illinois
58 posts, read 149,514 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
I suggest reconsidering Chicago if you have more "hooks" there. The 2 hours isn't a good enough reason to avoid this city if you can find a job quicker, or you know a place to rent. Also knowing people who can help at the beginning is a bonus. In todays economy don't get stuck on NYC, but go where its easier to start. Just my 2 cents.

Other than the fact that I know people who attend my college from the suburbs of Chicago, I have no ties to that city. I don't think I have anymore of an in to getting a job there outside of the hiring freeze. The only +'s I have in my favor for Chicago are more familiarity with the city (only because I've been there and have never been to NYC) and rent might be cheaper. My reasoning for trying NYC instead was a change of backdrop. I know what Lake Shore Drive looks like and despite the fact that I live 2 hours way, Chicago feels homey. I want to go somewhere new and challenge myself while I'm single and don't have any kids. Besides, my mom would drive up on weekends. I love her to death, but I need to get out of her reach.

Thanks for the info on the hiring freeze. I had know idea. I don't mind working in a rough school I'll just have to familiarize myself with the area prior to starting the position. Everyone wants the cushy jobs, but I have an interest in teaching kids that aren't so privileged. Of course I'm not stupid and think it's going to be a Hollywood version of an inner city school. I've always had an interest in NYC and want to be a little more than just a tourist. I would probably only stay in NYC until my contract ran out. It's a city, not the promised land. I have no romanticized views, I just want to say I tried while I had the chance.

I'm honestly more interested in living in Queens or Brooklyn than Manhattan. I don't mind traveling times (it takes 45 minutes to get to a decent mall around here).

Thanks for the input on my questions. More advice is welcomed.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2009, 09:20 PM
 
346 posts, read 1,133,844 times
Reputation: 225
The city is hiring NO NEW TEACHERS for this year due to financial shortfalls. You'll have to either do private school or find another school system willing to higher you. Aside from which, the city is looking to get teachers on the cheap via the NYC Teaching Fellows Program. Its good for the school system because it locks teachers into the system for years. Go to Chicago, get a few years of job experience (rougher the school the better, since god knows that's where the city would place you anyway) and try again in 5 years.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2009, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,192,691 times
Reputation: 1819
Just so you know, teaching in a needy area of NYC will probably be a shock to you if you aren't from around here.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2010, 05:26 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,485 times
Reputation: 10
I know these were all posted months ago, but I just wanted to say that I'm in the same boat as you...from rural Washington however. I am graduating in the spring with social studies and ESL endorsments for secondary. and while i could stay in state and go to the Seattle area, I don't really want to, I would rather get away just like you. so good luck to us both!
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top