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Old 11-16-2009, 12:48 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,244,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldwanderer View Post
Depending how old you are, and how much you've seen and done, will determine how quick you are to think nyc is "overrated". I personally have never eaten at any of the fancy 5 star restaurants in Mannhattan. I'm sure they're as great as everyone says they are. But I don't have that kinda of money to blow on a meal. It amazes me that people can drop a grand on dinner and whine, and not think twice about it. For those people, there ain't many other cities besides LA, SF, and maybe a couple others that could keep them happy with upscale entertainment. But for your avg wage earner?

So where do you think most new yorkers eat at, most of them are not as wealthy and don't go to those 5 star restaurants, in fact most of the great food is at moderate to cheap places at certain times.

I too think the food is HIGHLY "overrated" in nyc. Remember now, I'm talking about take out, or dishes under $20 bucs. I don't like to, and rarely do, spend more than say $60 bucs or so on a date for a meal. And after I've been with the woman awhile, that even drops (the honeymoon is over).



I'd go as far to say, nyc has some of the worse take-out food outside of the sunbelt cities. I really believe that the high volume that nyc restaurants recieve, allows them to sacrafice quality. Where as smaller cities have to work harder to produce better food to stay in business. I've eaten more crappy pizza in nyc than anywhere else. I've also had some great pizza there, but overall, thumbs down. NYC recieves over 40 million visiters a year, believe me, a lot of those people have eaten food that they didn't like. But they ate at them places cause they didn't know any better.

With tons of restaurants and places to take out, your statement doesn't make much relevant information at all, most places are not necessarily high volume, if anything the limited selection in the sunbelt may mean it has a greater proportion of high volume places by type.

As for pizza, that's an acedontal statement , there are many great pizza places in new york city, of course just because you may have eaten at a few lousy places in any city doesn't speak for the top pizza take out places that exist.

You could probably make a fortune selling the world's 'worst' hot dogs in Times Square. You'd have so many tourist eating your dogs, who cares if they ever bought another dog off you.
Times Square is a tourist trap, and the hot dogs at touristy places are designed for people for convenience and for a quickie bite while on their way to see something or if they don't have time to eat something, if you fell into the assumption that it was known for its hot dogs perhaps you should go back and re-evaluate.
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Old 11-16-2009, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,753 posts, read 25,531,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualDreamer View Post
Your post is very insightful, thank you.

What place would you recommend for someone who would like to get away from apartment living situation. what are the places where one can rent a townhouse or a single family house that are easy commute to midtown? Maybe i should post this as another thread, asking advice on where to move out of Manhattan..
You're welcome. I am sorry that I didn't return to this thread until now, and didn't see your post.

A townhouse or single family house to get away from the apartment scene in Manhattan, yet offers proximity to Manhattan and is still part of NYC can be found in any of the other boroughs, but Staten Island is not the most convenient, owing to the train to the ferry or express bus to Manhattan. Parts of The Bronx, including Riverdale and Woodlawn would be at the top of the list because you can have an easy commutes via Metro North or express bus. Queens, especially eastern Queens, would definitely fit the bill, including parts of Bayside, Douglaston, Little Neck, and Floral Park. The bus to the subway route from these areas will take a long time to get to Manhattan, as can the express bus, but you can be at Penn Station in under thirty minutes on the LIRR on the Port Washington Line that runs through this part of Queens. Parts of Forest Hills Gardens would be on the list as well, since there are some multi-family properties that are close to the LIRR. In Brooklyn, an area such as Dyker Heights and parts of Bay Ridge offer this feel, but they do not offer the fastest commutes to Manhattan because you don't have the option of the LIRR, only the subway or bus.

Any of these areas would be a good place to find a respite within the city, offering one the opportunity to exist with the city and a semblance of nature. Riverdale has Hudson River views, and parts of Queens have the Sound Shore, not to mention abundant parkland in both areas, and options for Metro North/LIRR and express bus commutes, so I might tend to recommend The Bronx and Queens ahead of Brooklyn for that reason.
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Old 11-16-2009, 02:01 AM
 
331 posts, read 583,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
Times Square is a tourist trap, and the hot dogs at touristy places are designed for people for convenience and for a quickie bite while on their way to see something or if they don't have time to eat something, if you fell into the assumption that it was known for its hot dogs perhaps you should go back and re-evaluate.
Are you serious with this post? Is Times Square really a tourist trap? Thanks for that tip. I thought it was kind of strange seeing a Hard Rock Cafe there. .....
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Old 11-16-2009, 02:12 AM
 
331 posts, read 583,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
The "food is not that great"?, Manhattan and the new york region have a much wider selection than may places, its people who are either displaced or in denial and like to shift the blame game or are newbies (the person said they only lived for a few months), if anything people could say that cali's food is overrated although I don't believe that, people may be more of will to say that, how many resturants or places have you eaten at, that alone should call the person's comments into question.

As far as "authentic" how do you find "authentic culture", there isn't really such a thing especially if a city has many diverse cultures.
A wider selection doesn't mean "better". Why can't some of you people get this into your heads? That being said, like I've said before, I'm sure no other city in the world can come close when you start talking about the upscale restaurants and 5 stars.

Can you tell me what my taste buds taste? Why would someone lie about thinking nyc's food is "overrated"? Seriously, why? Maybe this person has travelled more than you, and has eaten from coast to coast.

I guess you're going to tell me that the "Buffalo wings" in nyc are better and more "authentic" than they are up in the city of "Buffalo". Or that nyc's "deep dish pizza" is better and more "authentic" than it is in Chicago. Or that Philly's "cheese-steak" is subpar compared to NYC's better and more "authentic" version. You get my point.

Quit acting like people are somehow screwed up cause they find food in other cities, just as good, if not better. Especially when you start talking about the price differences.
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Old 11-16-2009, 03:45 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,244,775 times
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quote=worldwanderer;11643958]A wider selection doesn't mean "better". Why can't some of you people get this into your heads? That being said, like I've said before, I'm sure no other city in the world can come close when you start talking about the upscale restaurants and 5 stars.

Well, I seriously doubt your sunbelt cities have a different selection then what you'd find here, the point is there are multiple places to suit different tastebuds.

Can you tell me what my taste buds taste? Why would someone lie about thinking nyc's food is "overrated"? Seriously, why? Maybe this person has travelled more than you, and has eaten from coast to coast.

No its because, many people easily dismiss or fall into tourists traps or don't take the time to properly review things, I seriously doubt there is anything that can be called "nyc's food".

I guess you're going to tell me that the "Buffalo wings" in nyc are better and more "authentic" than they are up in the city of "Buffalo". Or that nyc's "deep dish pizza" is better and more "authentic" than it is in Chicago. Or that Philly's "cheese-steak" is subpar compared to NYC's better and more "authentic" version. You get my point.


No that's not how it works, different folks have different resturants who make different styles, its not a matter of so and so city's food , a person in new york city can easily make buffalo wings and philly cheese steak and chicago style pizza with the freshest ingredients while those cities may stray from their "authentic roots", which by the way "authentic" may not be what people prefer.

To demonstrate the fallacy of your statement, its like saying a style of Vietnamese or Korean food in new york city is new york city's Korean food or Vietnamese style food, when that same cuisine could exist in the native homeland or not exist in many other places due to immigration trends or that one group of Korean restaurants is horrible and tastes like Chinese food messed up even though there many be authenticity in another row-block.
Quit acting like people are somehow screwed up cause they find food in other cities, just as good, if not better. Especially when you start talking about the price differences.[/quote]
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Old 11-16-2009, 04:42 AM
 
331 posts, read 583,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
quote=worldwanderer;11643958]A wider selection doesn't mean "better". Why can't some of you people get this into your heads? That being said, like I've said before, I'm sure no other city in the world can come close when you start talking about the upscale restaurants and 5 stars.

Well, I seriously doubt your sunbelt cities have a different selection then what you'd find here, the point is there are multiple places to suit different tastebuds.

Can you tell me what my taste buds taste? Why would someone lie about thinking nyc's food is "overrated"? Seriously, why? Maybe this person has travelled more than you, and has eaten from coast to coast.

No its because, many people easily dismiss or fall into tourists traps or don't take the time to properly review things, I seriously doubt there is anything that can be called "nyc's food".

I guess you're going to tell me that the "Buffalo wings" in nyc are better and more "authentic" than they are up in the city of "Buffalo". Or that nyc's "deep dish pizza" is better and more "authentic" than it is in Chicago. Or that Philly's "cheese-steak" is subpar compared to NYC's better and more "authentic" version. You get my point.


No that's not how it works, different folks have different resturants who make different styles, its not a matter of so and so city's food , a person in new york city can easily make buffalo wings and philly cheese steak and chicago style pizza with the freshest ingredients while those cities may stray from their "authentic roots", which by the way "authentic" may not be what people prefer.

To demonstrate the fallacy of your statement, its like saying a style of Vietnamese or Korean food in new york city is new york city's Korean food or Vietnamese style food, when that same cuisine could exist in the native homeland or not exist in many other places due to immigration trends or that one group of Korean restaurants is horrible and tastes like Chinese food messed up even though there many be authenticity in another row-block.
Quit acting like people are somehow screwed up cause they find food in other cities, just as good, if not better. Especially when you start talking about the price differences.
[/quote]

You are wrong on so many levels.

First, is every city west of the Hudson a "sunbelt city" now?

Tourist traps? I guess nobody should go to Coney Island then? In fact, a lot of Manhattan should be off limits also considering that NYC gets well over 40 million visiters a year (most which stay and or visit Manhattan).

When a certain food, and the place that makes it, becomes well known, doesn't it automactically become a "tourist trap"? Gino's and Pat's in Philly are certainly tourist traps, but the locals still swear by those cheese-steaks. If a place serves great food, word will get out, there's no stopping it. And if that place happens to be located conveinent to tourist attractions, does that somehow lessen the food that they serve?

Reading reviews? Christ, that seems like an awful amount of work just to 'grab a bite'. If the food in nyc is as good as you 'claim' it is, chances should be that the food is good, more so than not, right? Easily dismiss? If I eat somewhere, and I don't like it, I don't go back, period! Maybe you're into giving places second or third chances, not me. First impression is what keeps me coming back.

See, this is really where you start to stray. Have you ever eaten "Buffalo wings" in a bar in "Buffalo"? Believe me what I say, those recipes are guarded and handed down thru the families. Remember the "Soup Nazi" episode from Seinfield? That kinda of stuff really does exists when it comes to recipes. Something as simple as using a diferent brand of sauce can change the taste. And I NEVER had wings in nyc that could compare. Actually, Pittsburgh is the only other city that has wings that come close to Buffalo's.

You are really down playing privately owned restaurants, and their ability to make an unique tasting dishes. You really believe that good meatball recipes are a dime a dozen? Or good pizza sauce? Or how to make a "real" Chicago deep dish pizza? If it was so easy to make this stuff, nobody ever have a bad meal.

My home state of Pa. has liquor laws that require bars to serve food if they want a 'Sunday license'. Which of course every bar wants. And that doesn't mean 'cold cuts' either. They have to serve hot food. Pittsburgh is a big football town in case you didn't know. And going to the bars to watch the Steelers is part of the city culture. So a lot of bars make sure that their food is really good to kept the customers coming in. It only makes good business sense to do so. Now, you'll never sit across from Deniro and break bread with him like you would at Per Se's in nyc (I think that's the name ), but that doesn't mean that the food ain't great. Some of the best food I've ever eaten in Pittsburgh was out of bars.

There's no fallacy in my statements. The truth of the matter is, I've eaten great food all over America. I've even had great pizza in Florida!

I'm sure you're well aware of the fact that what most American's order in Chinese restaurants, ain't really Chinese food. Or atleast it's made to cater to the taste of American taste buds. The Chinese would all be a lot fatter if they ate what most of us order when we order Chinese food.

Now if you want to brag about nyc's 5 star restaurant scene, go ahead. No other city can compete on that level, nyc wins hands down.
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Old 11-16-2009, 07:04 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,244,775 times
Reputation: 84
You are wrong on so many levels.

First, is every city west of the Hudson a "sunbelt city" now?

Tourist traps? I guess nobody should go to Coney Island then? In fact, a lot of Manhattan should be off limits also considering that NYC gets well over 40 million visiters a year (most which stay and or visit Manhattan).

When a certain food, and the place that makes it, becomes well known, doesn't it automactically become a "tourist trap"? Gino's and Pat's in Philly are certainly tourist traps, but the locals still swear by those cheese-steaks. If a place serves great food, word will get out, there's no stopping it. And if that place happens to be located conveinent to tourist attractions, does that somehow lessen the food that they serve?

It can quality can go down after a while, and using your example of a hot dog stand in times square people will still keep buying to an extent.

Reading reviews? Christ, that seems like an awful amount of work just to 'grab a bite'. If the food in nyc is as good as you 'claim' it is, chances should be that the food is good, more so than not, right? Easily dismiss? If I eat somewhere, and I don't like it, I don't go back, period! Maybe you're into giving places second or third chances, not me. First impression is what keeps me coming back.



See, this is really where you start to stray. Have you ever eaten "Buffalo wings" in a bar in "Buffalo"? Believe me what I say, those recipes are guarded and handed down thru the families. Remember the "Soup Nazi" episode from Seinfield? That kinda of stuff really does exists when it comes to recipes. Something as simple as using a diferent brand of sauce can change the taste. And I NEVER had wings in nyc that could compare. Actually, Pittsburgh is the only other city that has wings that come close to Buffalo's.

One could argue that they have secret recipes in new york as well, but many folks have left buffalo and Pitt over the years so I doubt the unique secret recipe applies as you say it, also natives may not like the food or find it creative or outsiders

may think its find and dandy when it really is no big deal aka street food.

You are really down playing privately owned restaurants, and their ability to make an unique tasting dishes. You really believe that good meatball recipes are a dime a dozen? Or good pizza sauce? Or how to make a "real" Chicago deep dish pizza? If it was so easy to make this stuff, nobody ever have a bad meal.

It is easy to make, it just take a lot of time and effort and learning which many folks don't always have.I am not playing down privately owned restaurants at all.

My home state of Pa. has liquor laws that require bars to serve food if they want a 'Sunday license'. Which of course every bar wants. And that doesn't mean 'cold cuts' either. They have to serve hot food. Pittsburgh is a big football town in case you didn't know. And going to the bars to watch the Steelers is part of the city culture. So a lot of bars make sure that their food is really good to kept the customers coming in. It only makes good business sense to do so. Now, you'll never sit across from Deniro and break bread with him like you would at Per Se's in nyc (I think that's the name ), but that doesn't mean that the food ain't great. Some of the best food I've ever eaten in Pittsburgh was out of bars.

Pittsburgh does have food appeal in which a bit of creativity is used although some of it is good food products rather than great food, I do give a bit of credit, I saw a show with the food travel guy in Pittsburgh eating breakfast and omelets and very hot wings at the sports bar, so I'll partially believe you on that point.Did you ever watch that episode.

There's no fallacy in my statements. The truth of the matter is, I've eaten great food all over America. I've even had great pizza in Florida!

I'm sure you're well aware of the fact that what most American's order in Chinese restaurants, ain't really Chinese food. Or atleast it's made to cater to the taste of American taste buds. The Chinese would all be a lot fatter if they ate what most of us order when we order Chinese food.

I didn't say Chinese take outs were real Chinese food,

Now if you want to brag about nyc's 5 star restaurant scene, go ahead. No other city can compete on that level, nyc wins hands down. [/quote]

I'm not getting the 5 star part, there are many "5 star places that are overrated", that receive a lot of press, but there are some more upscale places that are great.
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Old 11-16-2009, 02:21 PM
 
8,750 posts, read 15,555,711 times
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I think the food is good here, but I have found the service, food, and quality in Providence restaurants to oftentimes be significantly better. The selection is huge here, but unfortunately everyone has a restuarant it seems, and too many are in it purely for the money, which is the problem in NYC. There are lots of good ones...and whole lot of bad ones in NYC, while in Providence there are a whole lot of good ones, and a few bad ones...and those bad ones don't last long.

Nevertheless, is NYC worth it is such and open-ended, subjective question that there will never be answer that is appropriate..except of course, for some its worth it, for most others it isn't.
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Old 11-16-2009, 04:55 PM
 
331 posts, read 583,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
I think the food is good here, but I have found the service, food, and quality in Providence restaurants to oftentimes be significantly better. The selection is huge here, but unfortunately everyone has a restuarant it seems, and too many are in it purely for the money, which is the problem in NYC. There are lots of good ones...and whole lot of bad ones in NYC, while in Providence there are a whole lot of good ones, and a few bad ones...and those bad ones don't last long.

Nevertheless, is NYC worth it is such and open-ended, subjective question that there will never be answer that is appropriate..except of course, for some its worth it, for most others it isn't.
Thank you. My point exactly! Quantity doesn't = "quality".

Smaller cities don't have the luxury of all the foot traffic and tourists that most nyc's reaturants experience. How many customers in nyc visit a place and never go back just cause of the fact they were only passing thru the neighborhood, or visiting nyc? In smaller cities, restaurants will go belly-up if there food is subpar.

I've never been one to waste food. But quite a few times in nyc, I've thrown half the meal out cause it was so bad. Some of the pizza there is so bad, I don't have a clue how those pizza shops stay in business. Every city has bad pizza, but the % to me is higher in nyc.

High volume a lot of times means the food with suffer. And the chances that that food was made with fresh ingredients will also decrease.
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Old 11-16-2009, 05:34 PM
 
331 posts, read 583,512 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
You are wrong on so many levels.

First, is every city west of the Hudson a "sunbelt city" now?

Tourist traps? I guess nobody should go to Coney Island then? In fact, a lot of Manhattan should be off limits also considering that NYC gets well over 40 million visiters a year (most which stay and or visit Manhattan).

When a certain food, and the place that makes it, becomes well known, doesn't it automactically become a "tourist trap"? Gino's and Pat's in Philly are certainly tourist traps, but the locals still swear by those cheese-steaks. If a place serves great food, word will get out, there's no stopping it. And if that place happens to be located conveinent to tourist attractions, does that somehow lessen the food that they serve?

It can quality can go down after a while, and using your example of a hot dog stand in times square people will still keep buying to an extent.

Reading reviews? Christ, that seems like an awful amount of work just to 'grab a bite'. If the food in nyc is as good as you 'claim' it is, chances should be that the food is good, more so than not, right? Easily dismiss? If I eat somewhere, and I don't like it, I don't go back, period! Maybe you're into giving places second or third chances, not me. First impression is what keeps me coming back.



See, this is really where you start to stray. Have you ever eaten "Buffalo wings" in a bar in "Buffalo"? Believe me what I say, those recipes are guarded and handed down thru the families. Remember the "Soup Nazi" episode from Seinfield? That kinda of stuff really does exists when it comes to recipes. Something as simple as using a diferent brand of sauce can change the taste. And I NEVER had wings in nyc that could compare. Actually, Pittsburgh is the only other city that has wings that come close to Buffalo's.

One could argue that they have secret recipes in new york as well, but many folks have left buffalo and Pitt over the years so I doubt the unique secret recipe applies as you say it, also natives may not like the food or find it creative or outsiders

may think its find and dandy when it really is no big deal aka street food.

You are really down playing privately owned restaurants, and their ability to make an unique tasting dishes. You really believe that good meatball recipes are a dime a dozen? Or good pizza sauce? Or how to make a "real" Chicago deep dish pizza? If it was so easy to make this stuff, nobody ever have a bad meal.

It is easy to make, it just take a lot of time and effort and learning which many folks don't always have.I am not playing down privately owned restaurants at all.

My home state of Pa. has liquor laws that require bars to serve food if they want a 'Sunday license'. Which of course every bar wants. And that doesn't mean 'cold cuts' either. They have to serve hot food. Pittsburgh is a big football town in case you didn't know. And going to the bars to watch the Steelers is part of the city culture. So a lot of bars make sure that their food is really good to kept the customers coming in. It only makes good business sense to do so. Now, you'll never sit across from Deniro and break bread with him like you would at Per Se's in nyc (I think that's the name ), but that doesn't mean that the food ain't great. Some of the best food I've ever eaten in Pittsburgh was out of bars.

Pittsburgh does have food appeal in which a bit of creativity is used although some of it is good food products rather than great food, I do give a bit of credit, I saw a show with the food travel guy in Pittsburgh eating breakfast and omelets and very hot wings at the sports bar, so I'll partially believe you on that point.Did you ever watch that episode.

There's no fallacy in my statements. The truth of the matter is, I've eaten great food all over America. I've even had great pizza in Florida!

I'm sure you're well aware of the fact that what most American's order in Chinese restaurants, ain't really Chinese food. Or atleast it's made to cater to the taste of American taste buds. The Chinese would all be a lot fatter if they ate what most of us order when we order Chinese food.

I didn't say Chinese take outs were real Chinese food,

Now if you want to brag about nyc's 5 star restaurant scene, go ahead. No other city can compete on that level, nyc wins hands down.
I'm not getting the 5 star part, there are many "5 star places that are overrated", that receive a lot of press, but there are some more upscale places that are great.[/quote]

I agree with your statement about "good" food sometimes going down hill after it reaches "tourist trap" status (and sometimes the food was just overrrated from jump-street). I think both Gino's and Pat's are both overrrated. I've had better cheese-steaks in diners in Philly. The convient neighborhood location is really a selling point. Plus after the bars clear out, it's not like there's a lot of places to eat at that hour in Philly.

To give you an example. There's a pizza shop in the Bloomfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The owner goes down to the Strip District every morning to buy 'fresh' pepperoni. It's the best pepperoni I've ever had on a pizza. Or eating pasta that was actually hand made, not from a box. It's little touches like that, that really can make a difference. Something that a lot of high volume places don't do, and it effects their food.

No I've never watched the Food Network or seen that show. Pittsburgh has nowhere near the amount of restaurants that nyc does. But what they do have, is pretty good for the most part.

You partially believe what I say? Listen, I have no axe to grind about nyc's food. I'm just telling you, from personal experience, the avg dish from nyc isn't anything special. Maybe nyc's high rent makes it impossible for most places to use fresh products, or to take the time to make the food the right way, I don't know. But I've eaten in enough cities to know what a certain food should taste like, and can taste like.

You saying that "many" 5 stars restaurants in nyc are overrated, I'll have to take your word on that. Personally, I don't think any meal is worth what those restaurants charge. But that's my point, if some of the so-called "best of the best" 5 stars are "overrated", what about all the hole-in-the-wall joints? If your meal ain't great for $200 bucs, what's the chance for $10 or $15 bucs it's going to be? See what I mean?
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