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Old 11-17-2009, 03:06 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,249,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldwanderer View Post
I'm not getting the 5 star part, there are many "5 star places that are overrated", that receive a lot of press, but there are some more upscale places that are great.
I agree with your statement about "good" food sometimes going down hill after it reaches "tourist trap" status (and sometimes the food was just overrrated from jump-street). I think both Gino's and Pat's are both overrrated. I've had better cheese-steaks in diners in Philly. The convient neighborhood location is really a selling point. Plus after the bars clear out, it's not like there's a lot of places to eat at that hour in Philly.

To give you an example. There's a pizza shop in the Bloomfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The owner goes down to the Strip District every morning to buy 'fresh' pepperoni. It's the best pepperoni I've ever had on a pizza. Or eating pasta that was actually hand made, not from a box. It's little touches like that, that really can make a difference. Something that a lot of high volume places don't do, and it effects their food.

No I've never watched the Food Network or seen that show. Pittsburgh has nowhere near the amount of restaurants that nyc does. But what they do have, is pretty good for the most part.

You partially believe what I say? Listen, I have no axe to grind about nyc's food. I'm just telling you, from personal experience, the avg dish from nyc isn't anything special. Maybe nyc's high rent makes it impossible for most places to use fresh products, or to take the time to make the food the right way, I don't know. But I've eaten in enough cities to know what a certain food should taste like, and can taste like.

You saying that "many" 5 stars restaurants in nyc are overrated, I'll have to take your word on that. Personally, I don't think any meal is worth what those restaurants charge. But that's my point, if some of the so-called "best of the best" 5 stars are "overrated", what about all the hole-in-the-wall joints? If your meal ain't great for $200 bucs, what's the chance for $10 or $15 bucs it's going to be? See what I mean?[/quote]


I think I understand what you are trying to convey, given that food in Manhattan may be more expensive the not-so-great food can still be a few dollars more, leading people to spend more money in restaurants, I think the point you should understand though is that some of the higher end 4 and 5 star places may have more reasonable deals and portions and offers, it depends on the place.

The one problem in your argument is that many great food places may come from folks who are coming into new york city, for instance somebody may leave the west coast or the south and open a great restaurant or take out place, the 5 star overrated places are usually the ones that have a lot of window-dressing and hype and more located in high traffic areas or expensive areas and may go downhill after a while.

There are also many great take out joints, but yes you should generally avoid some of the cheap places that skimp out.

There is a place in Brooklyn that sells great pizza, the catch is $5 a slice, the market supports that and the food is always fresh and great because of the ingredients, of course it may have a bit of hype but you may have a point of being that a $1-2 slice may not exist at good quality in places like Manhattan without having cutbacks or sacrifices in quality (aka high rent or high costs) .

Still I don't think there is something called avg food, many places in the outer boroughs are more ethnic or specialized cuisine making "average food" a bit of a stretch to call.

You should note that the decision to give a more personalized touch or add value to a dish and what-not rests not just on the market conditions or rents but the management of that particular place and the service, which unfortunately but not always may have to be at a more 4 or 5 star restaurant, some of the other cities don't necessarily cut you more slack there may also be more limited selection in the touristy or crowded areas and like you said convenience , I don't think that's a problem just in new york city.
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Old 11-17-2009, 06:57 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 33,885,908 times
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If you want a separate thread about food in NYC, that's fine. But please keep this thread on-topic.

Thank you.
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Old 11-17-2009, 02:35 PM
 
331 posts, read 585,966 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
I agree with your statement about "good" food sometimes going down hill after it reaches "tourist trap" status (and sometimes the food was just overrrated from jump-street). I think both Gino's and Pat's are both overrrated. I've had better cheese-steaks in diners in Philly. The convient neighborhood location is really a selling point. Plus after the bars clear out, it's not like there's a lot of places to eat at that hour in Philly.

To give you an example. There's a pizza shop in the Bloomfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The owner goes down to the Strip District every morning to buy 'fresh' pepperoni. It's the best pepperoni I've ever had on a pizza. Or eating pasta that was actually hand made, not from a box. It's little touches like that, that really can make a difference. Something that a lot of high volume places don't do, and it effects their food.

No I've never watched the Food Network or seen that show. Pittsburgh has nowhere near the amount of restaurants that nyc does. But what they do have, is pretty good for the most part.

You partially believe what I say? Listen, I have no axe to grind about nyc's food. I'm just telling you, from personal experience, the avg dish from nyc isn't anything special. Maybe nyc's high rent makes it impossible for most places to use fresh products, or to take the time to make the food the right way, I don't know. But I've eaten in enough cities to know what a certain food should taste like, and can taste like.

You saying that "many" 5 stars restaurants in nyc are overrated, I'll have to take your word on that. Personally, I don't think any meal is worth what those restaurants charge. But that's my point, if some of the so-called "best of the best" 5 stars are "overrated", what about all the hole-in-the-wall joints? If your meal ain't great for $200 bucs, what's the chance for $10 or $15 bucs it's going to be? See what I mean?

I think I understand what you are trying to convey, given that food in Manhattan may be more expensive the not-so-great food can still be a few dollars more, leading people to spend more money in restaurants, I think the point you should understand though is that some of the higher end 4 and 5 star places may have more reasonable deals and portions and offers, it depends on the place.

The one problem in your argument is that many great food places may come from folks who are coming into new york city, for instance somebody may leave the west coast or the south and open a great restaurant or take out place, the 5 star overrated places are usually the ones that have a lot of window-dressing and hype and more located in high traffic areas or expensive areas and may go downhill after a while.

There are also many great take out joints, but yes you should generally avoid some of the cheap places that skimp out.

There is a place in Brooklyn that sells great pizza, the catch is $5 a slice, the market supports that and the food is always fresh and great because of the ingredients, of course it may have a bit of hype but you may have a point of being that a $1-2 slice may not exist at good quality in places like Manhattan without having cutbacks or sacrifices in quality (aka high rent or high costs) .

Still I don't think there is something called avg food, many places in the outer boroughs are more ethnic or specialized cuisine making "average food" a bit of a stretch to call.

You should note that the decision to give a more personalized touch or add value to a dish and what-not rests not just on the market conditions or rents but the management of that particular place and the service, which unfortunately but not always may have to be at a more 4 or 5 star restaurant, some of the other cities don't necessarily cut you more slack there may also be more limited selection in the touristy or crowded areas and like you said convenience , I don't think that's a problem just in new york city.
[/quote]


To veer this conversation back on topic, let's look at the OP's question, "Is NYC worth it"?

I had tears coming out of my eyes I was laughing so hard when I first read his post. I wasn't laughing at him at his expense, I was laughing cause of how crazy we all are at his age.

Living with "8 roommates in Bushwick and sharing 1 bathroom" is something that I never had to experience. I never had big dreams to make it big, so I don't think I could ever go thru what he's experiencing. His experience may be common in nyc, but that almost sounds like he's experiencing nyc like someone who's just gotten off the boat.

First of all, he's a transplant to nyc, not a native. Second of all, he's living the lifestyle of someone in the 3rd world, not your avg typical American lifestyle. The only people I know who eat tuna out of the can, are bodybuilders.

I tell him, unless he really believes that his income is going to greatly increase (and I mean in the very near future), it's time to head elsewhere.

A lot of ny'ers are quick to point out all the celebs, big shots, UN dignateries (I'm sure I spelled that wrong ), high wage earners, etc that live there. Well their nyc experience is a lot different! Not everybody lives like Jay Z and in a "Empire State of Mind" there.

A lot of people who were born and raised in nyc have a 'leg up' on transplants. Their parents might end up leaving them a house, or a relatively cheap rent controlled apt, or at the very least they always have a place to stay if things get bad for them. But this kid obviously doesn't have this luxury.

When you start talking about the "best of the best" in terms of careers and earning potential, I'm sure nyc wins hands down. But what about the majority of people who will never fall into this catorgory? Nyc is a very polarizing city in terms of the 'have's and have not's'. And the lifestyles really reflect that. More so than probably any city I've ever been to.

And if he's eating "noodles" and "tuna" of a can, I'd say $5 dollar slices of pizza are out of the question. Plus, how far does one have to travel to get that "slice"? Nyc is what, like 320 or 330 sq miles big? Travelling long distances to get a "good" slice might not be pratical for a lot of people.

I guess me and you will never agree on this. And that's OK too. But don't be close minded and thinking that anything west of the Hudson fails miserably. Nyc might be worth it to you and many others, but that doesn't mean everyone. And some of those who think that "Nyc isn't worth it", are high wage earners. In fact cross into NJ or Conn and you'll find many who believe this. Their job (and what it pays), is what keeps them commuting everyday into Manhattan, and nothing else.

Last edited by worldwanderer; 11-17-2009 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 11-17-2009, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
458 posts, read 763,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
Staten Island and the rest of NYC are completely different, I am not sure what you are pretty sick of , SI is often called the "dead end of the city" meaning its not like the rest of it.
Staten Island has 500,000 people and horrible traffic plus people with bad attitudes. It has changed drastically.
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Old 11-17-2009, 09:46 PM
 
656 posts, read 1,249,935 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by worldwanderer View Post
I think I understand what you are trying to convey, given that food in Manhattan may be more expensive the not-so-great food can still be a few dollars more, leading people to spend more money in restaurants, I think the point you should understand though is that some of the higher end 4 and 5 star places may have more reasonable deals and portions and offers, it depends on the place.

The one problem in your argument is that many great food places may come from folks who are coming into new york city, for instance somebody may leave the west coast or the south and open a great restaurant or take out place, the 5 star overrated places are usually the ones that have a lot of window-dressing and hype and more located in high traffic areas or expensive areas and may go downhill after a while.

There are also many great take out joints, but yes you should generally avoid some of the cheap places that skimp out.

There is a place in Brooklyn that sells great pizza, the catch is $5 a slice, the market supports that and the food is always fresh and great because of the ingredients, of course it may have a bit of hype but you may have a point of being that a $1-2 slice may not exist at good quality in places like Manhattan without having cutbacks or sacrifices in quality (aka high rent or high costs) .

Still I don't think there is something called avg food, many places in the outer boroughs are more ethnic or specialized cuisine making "average food" a bit of a stretch to call.

You should note that the decision to give a more personalized touch or add value to a dish and what-not rests not just on the market conditions or rents but the management of that particular place and the service, which unfortunately but not always may have to be at a more 4 or 5 star restaurant, some of the other cities don't necessarily cut you more slack there may also be more limited selection in the touristy or crowded areas and like you said convenience , I don't think that's a problem just in new york city.

To veer this conversation back on topic, let's look at the OP's question, "Is NYC worth it"?

I had tears coming out of my eyes I was laughing so hard when I first read his post. I wasn't laughing at him at his expense, I was laughing cause of how crazy we all are at his age.

Living with "8 roommates in Bushwick and sharing 1 bathroom" is something that I never had to experience. I never had big dreams to make it big, so I don't think I could ever go thru what he's experiencing. His experience may be common in nyc, but that almost sounds like he's experiencing nyc like someone who's just gotten off the boat.

That's pretty much right, ask yourself are the vast majority of new yorkers doing that, he did indicate he wanted to choose a hip neighboorhood which could be overhyped and like a tourist trap in a sense aka williamsburg.

First of all, he's a transplant to nyc, not a native. Second of all, he's living the lifestyle of someone in the 3rd world, not your avg typical American lifestyle. The only people I know who eat tuna out of the can, are bodybuilders.

I tell him, unless he really believes that his income is going to greatly increase (and I mean in the very near future), it's time to head elsewhere.

A lot of ny'ers are quick to point out all the celebs, big shots, UN dignateries (I'm sure I spelled that wrong ), high wage earners, etc that live there. Well their nyc experience is a lot different! Not everybody lives like Jay Z and in a "Empire State of Mind" there.

I really don't think so because they have famous celebs in other cities, the vast majority of new yorkers don't live in manhattan so its not like they think that way all the time.

A lot of people who were born and raised in nyc have a 'leg up' on transplants. Their parents might end up leaving them a house, or a relatively cheap rent controlled apt, or at the very least they always have a place to stay if things get bad for them. But this kid obviously doesn't have this luxury.

Agree, but although a significant number of new yorkers may have rent stabilized apartments , rents have increased and its easy to take it out, rent control - the older system is a bit more strict but few new yorkers have that, even such most new yorkers don't live in rent stabilized units and they can vary by city, neighborhood, and rent.

About leaving them a house, that is true and you correctly point out that newcomers would usually have more difficulty.


When you start talking about the "best of the best" in terms of careers and earning potential, I'm sure nyc wins hands down. But what about the majority of people who will never fall into this catorgory? Nyc is a very polarizing city in terms of the 'have's and have not's'. And the lifestyles really reflect that. More so than probably any city I've ever been to.

While that may be true to an extent, the a large number of new yorkers don't have that have or have not mentality, its not like there is the rich and poor and nobody else, many new yorkers get a long very fine and would not even benefit financially by moving , usually they may not be transplanted as you pointed out.

And if he's eating "noodles" and "tuna" of a can, I'd say $5 dollar slices of pizza are out of the question. Plus, how far does one have to travel to get that "slice"? Nyc is what, like 320 or 330 sq miles big? Travelling long distances to get a "good" slice might not be pratical for a lot of people.

I'm sure there are plenty of great places that don't need the $5 slice, taking the subway is easy, of course it may depend on your location but I doubt any other city has an advantage because people may live in the suburbs are in different sections of city.

I guess me and you will never agree on this. And that's OK too. But don't be close minded and thinking that anything west of the Hudson fails miserably. Nyc might be worth it to you and many others, but that doesn't mean everyone. And some of those who think that "Nyc isn't worth it", are high wage earners. In fact cross into NJ or Conn and you'll find many who believe this. Their job (and what it pays), is what keeps them commuting everyday into Manhattan, and nothing else.[/quote]

Most new yorkers don't live in Manhattan , have you thought that it could be true of many new yorkers who come into Manhattan and not much else except many a special event or assignment, that is a bigger difference between transplants and natives to an large extent .
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Old 11-17-2009, 10:57 PM
 
331 posts, read 585,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
To veer this conversation back on topic, let's look at the OP's question, "Is NYC worth it"?

I had tears coming out of my eyes I was laughing so hard when I first read his post. I wasn't laughing at him at his expense, I was laughing cause of how crazy we all are at his age.

Living with "8 roommates in Bushwick and sharing 1 bathroom" is something that I never had to experience. I never had big dreams to make it big, so I don't think I could ever go thru what he's experiencing. His experience may be common in nyc, but that almost sounds like he's experiencing nyc like someone who's just gotten off the boat.

That's pretty much right, ask yourself are the vast majority of new yorkers doing that, he did indicate he wanted to choose a hip neighboorhood which could be overhyped and like a tourist trap in a sense aka williamsburg.

First of all, he's a transplant to nyc, not a native. Second of all, he's living the lifestyle of someone in the 3rd world, not your avg typical American lifestyle. The only people I know who eat tuna out of the can, are bodybuilders.

I tell him, unless he really believes that his income is going to greatly increase (and I mean in the very near future), it's time to head elsewhere.

A lot of ny'ers are quick to point out all the celebs, big shots, UN dignateries (I'm sure I spelled that wrong ), high wage earners, etc that live there. Well their nyc experience is a lot different! Not everybody lives like Jay Z and in a "Empire State of Mind" there.

I really don't think so because they have famous celebs in other cities, the vast majority of new yorkers don't live in manhattan so its not like they think that way all the time.

A lot of people who were born and raised in nyc have a 'leg up' on transplants. Their parents might end up leaving them a house, or a relatively cheap rent controlled apt, or at the very least they always have a place to stay if things get bad for them. But this kid obviously doesn't have this luxury.

Agree, but although a significant number of new yorkers may have rent stabilized apartments , rents have increased and its easy to take it out, rent control - the older system is a bit more strict but few new yorkers have that, even such most new yorkers don't live in rent stabilized units and they can vary by city, neighborhood, and rent.

About leaving them a house, that is true and you correctly point out that newcomers would usually have more difficulty.


When you start talking about the "best of the best" in terms of careers and earning potential, I'm sure nyc wins hands down. But what about the majority of people who will never fall into this catorgory? Nyc is a very polarizing city in terms of the 'have's and have not's'. And the lifestyles really reflect that. More so than probably any city I've ever been to.

While that may be true to an extent, the a large number of new yorkers don't have that have or have not mentality, its not like there is the rich and poor and nobody else, many new yorkers get a long very fine and would not even benefit financially by moving , usually they may not be transplanted as you pointed out.

And if he's eating "noodles" and "tuna" of a can, I'd say $5 dollar slices of pizza are out of the question. Plus, how far does one have to travel to get that "slice"? Nyc is what, like 320 or 330 sq miles big? Travelling long distances to get a "good" slice might not be pratical for a lot of people.

I'm sure there are plenty of great places that don't need the $5 slice, taking the subway is easy, of course it may depend on your location but I doubt any other city has an advantage because people may live in the suburbs are in different sections of city.

I guess me and you will never agree on this. And that's OK too. But don't be close minded and thinking that anything west of the Hudson fails miserably. Nyc might be worth it to you and many others, but that doesn't mean everyone. And some of those who think that "Nyc isn't worth it", are high wage earners. In fact cross into NJ or Conn and you'll find many who believe this. Their job (and what it pays), is what keeps them commuting everyday into Manhattan, and nothing else.
Most new yorkers don't live in Manhattan , have you thought that it could be true of many new yorkers who come into Manhattan and not much else except many a special event or assignment, that is a bigger difference between transplants and natives to an large extent .[/quote]


My last comment to you (we're really beating a dead horse now).

Although the "vast majority" of ny'ers might not be sharing an apt with 8 people and 1 bath like he did, many many many ny'ers live with little or no privacy. Nyc is the first place I ever seen people modify apt's, so that they could rent rooms out (I've seen 1 bed apts turned into 3 bedrooms by doing this ). Nyc is also the only place I seen people stick their 'own' money into apts when 'renting'. I understand why they do so, if they moved their rent would sky rocket. Maybe they do the same in SF, but Nyc is the only place I ever seen or heard of it. Nyc is pretty unique also in the sense that people will live in the same apt for 30, 40, even 50 years.

Besides Nyc or LA, what other cities have celebs? Miami maybe? But a lot of that is for tax purposes and they end up staying in Nyc or LA the majority of the time anyway. The vast majority might not live in Manhattan, but over 1.6 million people do. Not to mention the huge amount that commute into Manhattan everday for work or entertainment.


I've met a lot of people that were in "rent controlled" apt's. Remember, I said "relatively cheap". In the outerboroughs, a lot of rent controlled apt's are just that, relatively cheap. And you saying that "newcomers would usually have more difficulty" when buying a house, that there is an UNDERSTATEMENT. A lot of people with money are snobby, Nyc is no different. And considering the wealth that's concetrated there, it's safe to assume my statements are true.

I don't understand what you are trying to say about the "rich and poor"? I can't tell you how many times I met people who lived in Manhattan and thumbed their noses at the outerboroughs. I guess nabes like Park Slope is now OK with them, but most don't like to cross a bridge. For many of them, there's nothing west of the Hudson, or east of the East river.


As far as your pizza comment, ya taking the subway 'can' be "easy". But it's not always "fast" or short commute. 1 or 2 stops no big deal, but when you start going further, or transfering, "fast" is out of the question.

Now you saying that you "doubt any city has an advantage"? Really? How about the fact that smaller cities will be less congested (for the most part). I can 'outdrive' a lot of locations in nyc compared to taking public transit. Once I get there, the parking may be an issue, but show me a bus that can outdrive a car. The subway can be faster sometimes, but not always. And it's not like Nyc has the monoply on walkable city neighborhoods, they do exist elsewhere also.


The OP needs to pack his bags unless his 'ship comes in'. No matter what you come up with, it won't change his living conditions. You romantizing NYC won't chang the reality of it.

If you're still reading this kid, enjoy the holidays there, then regroup after they're over. You asked "Is NYC really worth it"? I say NO. In fact, no place is worth it, if that's how you got to live. Move on to greener pastures (no pun intended ).

If you think the OP should stay, fine, but I don't.
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Old 11-18-2009, 02:32 AM
 
Location: Where the sun always shines
1,876 posts, read 2,442,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldwanderer View Post
Most new yorkers don't live in Manhattan , have you thought that it could be true of many new yorkers who come into Manhattan and not much else except many a special event or assignment, that is a bigger difference between transplants and natives to an large extent .

My last comment to you (we're really beating a dead horse now).

Although the "vast majority" of ny'ers might not be sharing an apt with 8 people and 1 bath like he did, many many many ny'ers live with little or no privacy. Nyc is the first place I ever seen people modify apt's, so that they could rent rooms out (I've seen 1 bed apts turned into 3 bedrooms by doing this ). Nyc is also the only place I seen people stick their 'own' money into apts when 'renting'. I understand why they do so, if they moved their rent would sky rocket. Maybe they do the same in SF, but Nyc is the only place I ever seen or heard of it. Nyc is pretty unique also in the sense that people will live in the same apt for 30, 40, even 50 years.

.[/quote]

Funny thing about this statement, a friend of mine a year ago paid 10k to redo the floors in his apt. Why? B/c he was paying 900/month on a 2 bedroom in Crown Heights and doesnt plan to move period.
As for the OP, as I said B4, cut out of town. If you dont have family to lean on in hard times, a ton of education, or a unique job skill thats in heavy demand, keep NYC as a vacation spot but dont think about living there. Financially and possibly mentally, it can drain you
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Old 11-18-2009, 03:30 AM
 
331 posts, read 585,966 times
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Funny thing about this statement, a friend of mine a year ago paid 10k to redo the floors in his apt. Why? B/c he was paying 900/month on a 2 bedroom in Crown Heights and doesnt plan to move period.
As for the OP, as I said B4, cut out of town. If you dont have family to lean on in hard times, a ton of education, or a unique job skill thats in heavy demand, keep NYC as a vacation spot but dont think about living there. Financially and possibly mentally, it can drain you[/quote]

That blows my mind what goes on in 'rented' nyc apts. That's crazy, a 10 grand investment into something that you don't even own!

I hope the OP reads this and see's how crazy the reality of living in nyc is for avg wage earners. Your point on education and unique job skill is very accurate too. Sure, that can be said about any city in America. But nowhere is it more true than nyc. That city will burn thru your wallet, "In a New York minute"! (pun intended )

I enjoy reading your posts, you don't sugar coat or romantize anything about nyc, like many on here do. Viralmd is pretty straight forward with his post also when people ask about moving to nyc. He doesn't pull any punches, and lets people know how expensive the city 'really' is. Unlike many others, who act like it's a sitcom or something.

Maybe a lot of these posters are atleast low 6 firgure wage earners, but even then? After taxes, rent, entertainment, etc, 100K in nyc is like 50K in most places.

Hopefully he'll listen, stop the suffering and move after the New Year.

I'm still thinking about your friend dropping 10K in an apt floor, and it's making me mad! lol lol "Only in NY", Ain't that the truth.......
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Old 09-20-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1 posts, read 575 times
Reputation: 10
Default Come to seattle!!

You will absolutely love Seattle. Beautiful, airy, nice people and I would say in the past 5 years there has been a BIG PUSH in the music scene.
Message me and I'll hook you up!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by wowthisplaceisbig View Post
Thanks guys!

I guess I just needed to hear it from someone else. Its difficult because my family and friends that live here just CAN'T imagine living anywhere else!!! Every time I say that I'm not digging it, they tell me I'm crazy "its New YORK, the greatest city in the world!! Its just your first year you'll learn to love it." But no... I don't think I will ever love it. I am just too laid back, I just don't find joy in having my face in a man's armpit on the way to and from work on the L... The smells of Brooklyn, the dirty warehouse parties (were cool at first), inhaling fumes as I race the J train on my bike going over the Williamsburg Bridge (still has to be one of my favorite things to do though), Did I mention trying to get to Central Park with my girl while the Puerto Rican Parade was happening? She started crying... I could go on for a while.
I don't regret it, I think everybody should do it, I'm pretty sure it has made me stronger, more resourceful, i've grownup a lot... But I think sometimes you just have to say that the challenge isn't worth it, its gotten to the point where its not making me stronger anymore its making bitter and broke. BITTER AND BROKE I tell you!

TunaBoy - your right. As much as I loved the outdoors in Cali, I didn't really dig the L.A. sprawl and traffic.

Austin however was one of my favorite cities I've been to. Seattle too, I have a girl I love very much in Seattle. Does anybody know if Seattles music scene has died after the 90's, has Austin's surpassed it? I am attracted to Seattle for the trees, ocean and skiing, and oh yeah that girl I let get away a year ago But Austin I know is cheaper... and sunnier.
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Old 09-20-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: New England
398 posts, read 563,636 times
Reputation: 577
It all depends what kind of person you are. If you take advantage of the 'city life', go out every night, if you're a serious artist and just have a burning desire to be around other artists (who IMO must be extremely poor as you are, or the heirs of some mysterious fortune), if you have a 'posse' here already that you just couldn't see leaving. Otherwise, I don't get the whole transplant thing. If I were from anywhere else, I'd be hard pressed to move to NYC... I figure any other city is friendlier, cheaper, cleaner, quieter than the chaos you'll experience on any given day here. Not to badmouth the chaos, some folks feed off it -- again, it's whatever you love best Even the money pales in comparison to what you need from life.
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