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Old 04-18-2010, 11:59 AM
 
48 posts, read 93,113 times
Reputation: 45

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Thank you for your input everyone and CrotonaPark, your idea was kind of similar to mine, i always kept in mind as well that if apartments and housing became so expensive and not many would buy, they would feel the need to lower so more can come in.

Gordon Gekko, I had no intention this post to turn into an argument and about what you said, I dont want NYC to turn into "Detroit II". Of course, i would like NYC to stay safe with low crime, but at the same time i dont want it to be just one big place for those who are rich. In no way am i saying that i resent upper class people but i think that in the future there should still be areas with upper class residents (such as the upper east side) and hard working people who dont have as much money in other areas.

Twist07, youre right, an economy without middle class citizens is bound to decline.

And one last comment, the whole "NYC will be filled with starbucks on every block" me personally i dont exactly mind that but i think that in order for the city to maintain its "soul" it has to keep the big sites and attractions such as: The brooklyn bridge, times square, the many different parks, coney island (which is being renovated) we will still keep those even if there are many chain restaurants but give me a few ethnic ones around (greek, latino, italian) and ill be fine. I would still love ny to keep its reputation for diversity and no one take this the wrong way, but people view gentrification for the most part having to do with caucasians, and in a way, if that belief is true then the many neighborhoods that had its popularity due to the ethnicity that made it would change. Example, imagine Chinatown having a small population of chinese citizens and instead mostly caucasians or african americans. Once again that wasnt meant to be an offense but that's just a thought.
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Old 12-28-2010, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
157 posts, read 347,486 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by $hayT93 View Post
Thank you for your input everyone and CrotonaPark, your idea was kind of similar to mine, i always kept in mind as well that if apartments and housing became so expensive and not many would buy, they would feel the need to lower so more can come in.

Gordon Gekko, I had no intention this post to turn into an argument and about what you said, I dont want NYC to turn into "Detroit II". Of course, i would like NYC to stay safe with low crime, but at the same time i dont want it to be just one big place for those who are rich. In no way am i saying that i resent upper class people but i think that in the future there should still be areas with upper class residents (such as the upper east side) and hard working people who dont have as much money in other areas.

Twist07, youre right, an economy without middle class citizens is bound to decline.

And one last comment, the whole "NYC will be filled with starbucks on every block" me personally i dont exactly mind that but i think that in order for the city to maintain its "soul" it has to keep the big sites and attractions such as: The brooklyn bridge, times square, the many different parks, coney island (which is being renovated) we will still keep those even if there are many chain restaurants but give me a few ethnic ones around (greek, latino, italian) and ill be fine. I would still love ny to keep its reputation for diversity and no one take this the wrong way, but people view gentrification for the most part having to do with caucasians, and in a way, if that belief is true then the many neighborhoods that had its popularity due to the ethnicity that made it would change. Example, imagine Chinatown having a small population of chinese citizens and instead mostly caucasians or african americans. Once again that wasnt meant to be an offense but that's just a thought.
The thing about these new apts and houses is that these corporate developers have invested, usually, a ton of money in their projects. Therefore, lowering slightly, SLIGHTLY, would be the only choice. Otherwise they would abandon the project, foreclosure, or whatever else, maybe bankruptcy, because they would not be making money at all, and would not make any money if they made it for low-income people.

Gecko or whatever is the definition of an ignorant, class-racist, yuppie-scum, low-testosterone, pansy, sheep who clearly is not a native New Yorker, and should move immediately (I knock the teeth out of people like you, you coward.)

Gentrification is a tool used by the government and political leaders to help "rejuvenate and diversify" neighborhoods. It brings in well-to-do/wealthy educated people (the majority of this population in America happens to be white people) and brings in improved amenities, improved quality-of-life, and fancy new retailers, restaurants, ect. The thing is, we don't have enough information on the side-effects of gentrification. All the government knows is that it attracts wealthy people and money, so they're all for it. The intricacies and profundity of the different frameworks in neighborhoods is creating an uncertain situation for the futures of these neighborhoods because of gentrification. It has been proven in recent scholarly articles does not improve diversity, but in fact, it decreases diversity. Think about it, an increase of wealthy, educated people into a working-class area will create more diversity, or increased separation between the original class that exists in the area? Race is no longer the "thing" in America, it's CLASS. Class is what separates people.

You are completely right when you talk about the original natives creating the soul, flavor, authenticity, whatever about the neighborhood. Traditions, sub-cultures, and many other complicated things that humans creates is all a part of being a human. It is really beautiful in a sense. It is what attracts these newcomers to our beautiful city. HOWEVER, when these careless, rich, newcomers come into the neighborhood they want to replace it with blandness and unnatural, popular media fads that will die out by next year. The 21st century and this gentrification is unlike anything else in the past changes because 1. it has never happened at the speed it is happening now 2. some people (not all but a significant population, ESPECIALLY in Manhattan) do not care at all for what was there before. All they care about is making money, ignoring what brought them there in the first place. (the making money factor comes from a bigger factor. Our country has become increasingly more focused on money during the end of the 20th and start of the 21st century. Specifically, the financial center aspect of it. And guess what? NYC is the smack dab in the middle of that in America.)

Continuing on what you were talking about with newcomers coming in replacing the old ones, leaving some old ones, ect. Yes, some people don't have any care in the world for what was there in the beginning (either they are the generation that followed what was there before, artists, hipsters, ect. or they simply could care less) and could therefore be very terrible for the future of the neighborhood. Who knows, if Harlem keeps gentrifying, maybe it will lose all its flavor, and people will start abandoning it. Who knows? That's the dangerous thing about gentrification. WE ARE ALL UNSURE! Yet, the government still encourages it and continues to use it as a tool without further research into it.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights, Brooklyn
1,050 posts, read 1,427,449 times
Reputation: 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Gekko. View Post
Most of you are fools.

If that incompetent moron Thompson would have defeated Bloomberg, New York would be in serious decline.

I suspect the anti-Bloomberg posters are welfare parasites who hate and are jealous of success and the good people it attracts (wealthy, smart, yuppies) and and are upset at the bad people it displaces (loud mouth, smelly, welfare leaching low-IQ trash) and pray for New York's demise into Detroit II....so they can feel better about their meager existence. New York City should always be a "Fortune 500 Blue Stock" and should always remain the capital of wealth and prosperity. New York City remaining a "luxury city", as Bloomberg calls it, makes the city more livable (re: safer, cleaner, more beautiful).

If you want a dumpy, poor, low-class Detroit II, please find an enclave in East New York or Newark and wallow in your desired filth. Plenty of "affordable" dumps in numerous slums in the outer-boroughs of the city.

Mayor Bloombuck$ is one of the best thing that has happened to this city.
Why live with such angry? Geez man, settle down
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Old 09-17-2015, 01:32 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
Reputation: 8529
Gentrification has been going on for a century. Midtown Manhattan was once slums. Before that is farmland. Clearly the city will always need working class city so the entire city cannot gentrify. But all of Manhattan will, and ditto Western Brooklyn and Western Queens.

Manufacturing left NYC, freight ships moved over to Jersey, so the types of jobs that expanded in the city in recent decades (healthcare, education, film/tv, media, etc.) all require high levels of education. That plays a huge part in gentrification. The city's working class works disproportionately in retail or hospitality (hotels, bars, restaurants) and on certain low level office jobs.
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Old 01-05-2016, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Hudson County NJ
630 posts, read 1,092,626 times
Reputation: 587
A crime increase, more subsidized housing, a loss of white collar jobs, small business protection measures and the loss of tourism would make this city more interesting! Broken windows policing should also be completely abandoned.
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Old 01-20-2016, 12:56 PM
 
100 posts, read 133,203 times
Reputation: 28
I think it will help the future of NYC and further reduce crime rates
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