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Old 11-14-2009, 12:51 AM
 
186 posts, read 297,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualDreamer View Post
NYC doesn't stress me out at all. I am talking about the energy of the city, busy sidewalks, subways, etc. Even having my apartment face on a busy street didn't bother me that much, it became the background noise after some time. I love the hustle and bustle of the city, it energizes me when I go outside in the morning to get to work, it wakes you up. I also absolutely love not having streets deserted after it gets dark, there is always life and activity. I don't find this stressful at all.

On the other hand, when I am at home I want some peace and quiet at least for a few hours and unfortunately in Manhattan it's a tough commodity to obtain. My living situation is what stresses me out and not because we are in a tiny apartment or have to share with roommates, not at all. It's the neighboring families that stress me out. I have a newborn sharing a bedroom wall with us and upstairs is a family with a hyper toddler. Between the two I have no peace and I don't know where to run away... I say this problem is not a problem with all the other big cities, I believe it's a Manhattan problem where families are forced to squeeze into very small apartments (both families live in 1 bedrooms) and where both parents are forced to work to make the ends meet. this creates noisy situation for neighbors and as always dealing with noise from children and families you are not going to get any sympathy. It is what it is, kids are noisy, running around, throwing tantrums is what they do, so you never get any resolution and nobody wants to hear you.

This is what stresses me out about NYC, sharing walls with families and getting no relief from management company and no cooperation from parents. Perhaps, some of you native NYCers are used to this and for you loud objects thrown against bare floors and screaming kids next door is a normal background noise, but for us, it was a very tough situation to get used to. I am definitely not going to get used to it as I need some relative peace when I come home, so Manhattan isn't a good fit. It's even more stressful than a stress at work or elbowing people around on a subway, it's when you get no peace unless it's the few hours of the night when the families sleep.
Wow, I could never have said it better myself. Unfortunately I have to deal with drunkards stumbling in at 4am and then dropping all of their deadweight on the floor above my bed...lovely. I think I would prefer kids, or ambulances for that matter.
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Old 11-14-2009, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,381 posts, read 32,880,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephil View Post
apartment life...lack of privacy...timing things properly...running as many errands as possible in one trip...detachment...keeping it all together (wallet, metro card, etc.)...not to mention cost of living...I'll say it's stressful. I have lived in some very stressful situations, but nothing compares to the day to day stress I feel here from the time I roll out of bed to the time I crawl back in after 12 hours of work...yah I am stressed.
i think a 60 hour work week would stress anybody out, regardless of where they lived....
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Old 11-14-2009, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,381 posts, read 32,880,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualDreamer View Post
Apartment thing may not be for us, you make a good point here. However, I am not a suburbanite or intend to move to the suburbs. I can simply move back to SF to my own house with a garage walking distance to amenities, parks and public transport with an option to drive my car and park it in my garage without a hassle. I guess, my lifestyle would be a bit more suburban in nature, but I definitely have options to commute to work or do some shopping and recreational activities in the park without driving. Manhattan or apartment living isn't the only way to experience urban lifestyle.

Brooklyn is great, but unfortunately I cannot afford to spend 2 million to own a rowhouse in the safe desirable area that is easy commute to Midtown. I wouldn't risk moving to an apartment building in Brooklyn heights on a promise that I may or may not have noisy families next to me. If I must commute, I must get a house of sorts. Whenever I lived in an apartment I always chose walking distance to work type of places.



We all know there are ill-behaved children and well-behaved children and good and bad parenting, but try telling this to the parents! It's never a good idea, so I always deal with the landlord unless the neighbor confronts me directly about complaining. The other problem is that when you complain people tend to site with families more so than with single people and the fact that you have no kids automatically discredits your ability to judge behavior of children.

I guess I just got unlucky..
So far we are dealing with the infant by sleeping in the living room, it makes our apartment feel like a studio with a big storage. We adopt.
thanks for your contribution to this thread.
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,784,835 times
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Actually, any place could be stressful if that's your mindset. But maybe I think that way because I'm a native New Yorker, and I try not to get stressed out over things I can't control. (In a city of eight million people, there's a lot of things I can't control!)
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Old 11-14-2009, 01:14 PM
 
186 posts, read 297,370 times
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Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
Actually, any place could be stressful if that's your mindset. But maybe I think that way because I'm a native New Yorker, and I try not to get stressed out over things I can't control. (In a city of eight million people, there's a lot of things I can't control!)
I agree totally, and through my life I have always been able to handle stress. But the stress I am dealing with here is different. It is unavoidable and routine, so I am forced to deal with it and move on. However, I am finding that the stress is manifesting itself in different ways, physical ways that I also can't control such as headaches, sleeping too much, feeling angry, etc... I do like it here a lot, and I am very thankful that I was able to come here and give it a shot with my company. That said, I think I will need some time to find balance and figure out what living situations are most ideal for me.
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Old 11-14-2009, 06:13 PM
 
8 posts, read 55,072 times
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I think there are a couple of things that make NYC stressful. I'm a native NYer and i feel that these are what my friends (the transplants) have told me.

1) The loud noise of the city
2) The fast pace
3) The confusion of the subway
4) The expensive rent/nice apt. syndrome (if you want to find cheaper rent, your commute will be longer - unless you make a lot of money 60k+ or have a lot of roomates)
5) The city is dirty (there are a lot of rats and roaches)
6) Hard to find a job (this is true anywhere)
7) Hard to meet people
8) There's a lot of diversity (this could bother you depending on where you are from)
9) The cost of living

I'm used to NYC and found my niche while I lived there but the main suggestions I have is try to live within your budget or below. For example, live in the suburbs of Manhattan and have roommates. Find free things to do, like the FREE concerts in Central Park during the summer. Also, take time to make your space your own and practice yoga or exercise.

Enjoy the city, there's only one place in the world like it!
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Crown Heights
965 posts, read 2,112,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psych_d View Post
I think there are a couple of things that make NYC stressful. I'm a native NYer and i feel that these are what my friends (the transplants) have told me.

1) The loud noise of the city
2) The fast pace
3) The confusion of the subway
4) The expensive rent/nice apt. syndrome (if you want to find cheaper rent, your commute will be longer - unless you make a lot of money 60k+ or have a lot of roomates)
5) The city is dirty (there are a lot of rats and roaches)
6) Hard to find a job (this is true anywhere)
7) Hard to meet people
8) There's a lot of diversity (this could bother you depending on where you are from)
9) The cost of living

I'm used to NYC and found my niche while I lived there but the main suggestions I have is try to live within your budget or below. For example, live in the suburbs of Manhattan and have roommates. Find free things to do, like the FREE concerts in Central Park during the summer. Also, take time to make your space your own and practice yoga or exercise.

Enjoy the city, there's only one place in the world like it!
you know, I never understood the not able to meet people part. I always end up meeting people by accident sometimes, and I've never been to a place where its so easy to network. Where I live here in orlando people these people are some of the lonliest i've ever met. There isn't a sense of community, even the kids don't play with each other. Halloween passed and not one knock on my door or anyone else in my building, and mad kids live here! However i digress, I still reiterate what I said earlier alot of these stress factors can be found anywhere. But the one thing I will agree that is unique about this situation is the cost of living, that is somewhat of a unique situation considering cost of living has gone down everywhere else due to the recession. Even though I think its a trade off and its worth it, a majority of people would not sit well with this.
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,530 posts, read 20,094,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psych_d View Post
I think there are a couple of things that make NYC stressful. I'm a native NYer and i feel that these are what my friends (the transplants) have told me.

1) The loud noise of the city
I'm a fan of NoisefreeAmerica.org, and reading that Bloomberg was on a quest to make NYC the quietest big city in America, curiously, after having not been there in 20 years, I decided to go and find out.

I was completely awed. Signs posting a $350 fine for honking your horn?
Less stress. No car alarms going off as I understand they are now illegal there. Less stress. I also read about how they've tried to contain these loud, thumping boom cars, and I never heard a boom car in all my walks around Manhattan, both on my trip last December or in April. Now if that isn't a stress reducer, what is? I never even heard police sirens, staying at a hostel in Harlem.

Noise is one of the biggest stress producers of all. According to NoisefreeAmerica it's the Number 1 reason why people relocate. Loud noise can even trigger heart attacks in people.

Keep up the good work! I'll be back again and again for a nice noise contained vacation.
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:49 PM
 
331 posts, read 584,419 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by twist07 View Post
you know, I never understood the not able to meet people part. I always end up meeting people by accident sometimes, and I've never been to a place where its so easy to network. Where I live here in orlando people these people are some of the lonliest i've ever met. There isn't a sense of community, even the kids don't play with each other. Halloween passed and not one knock on my door or anyone else in my building, and mad kids live here! However i digress, I still reiterate what I said earlier alot of these stress factors can be found anywhere. But the one thing I will agree that is unique about this situation is the cost of living, that is somewhat of a unique situation considering cost of living has gone down everywhere else due to the recession. Even though I think its a trade off and its worth it, a majority of people would not sit well with this.
I have to agree with you on the "meeting people". That is one of the biggest myths about nyc. Ny'ers are some of the friendliest and outgoing people in the country. How anyone can be lonely in nyc is beyond me? And like you also pointed out, the sunbelt cities have a very disconnected feeling to them. I think the car culture has a lot to do with that also.
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Old 11-14-2009, 10:01 PM
 
331 posts, read 584,419 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by psych_d View Post
I think there are a couple of things that make NYC stressful. I'm a native NYer and i feel that these are what my friends (the transplants) have told me.

1) The loud noise of the city
2) The fast pace
3) The confusion of the subway
4) The expensive rent/nice apt. syndrome (if you want to find cheaper rent, your commute will be longer - unless you make a lot of money 60k+ or have a lot of roomates)
5) The city is dirty (there are a lot of rats and roaches)
6) Hard to find a job (this is true anywhere)
7) Hard to meet people
8) There's a lot of diversity (this could bother you depending on where you are from)
9) The cost of living

I'm used to NYC and found my niche while I lived there but the main suggestions I have is try to live within your budget or below. For example, live in the suburbs of Manhattan and have roommates. Find free things to do, like the FREE concerts in Central Park during the summer. Also, take time to make your space your own and practice yoga or exercise.

Enjoy the city, there's only one place in the world like it!
1) Agree
2) Disagree. Most people who are from a major metro city can adapt to nyc's pace in a short period of time.
3) Disagree. At first, sure, but after a period of time people learn to maneuver the subway system pretty well.
4) Agree. Although I completely disagree that 60k is "a lot of money" in nyc. I don't consider 160k a year in nyc to be "a lot". It's a good buc, but certainly not "a lot".
5) Agree
6) Don't know? Never applied for a job there.
7) COMPLETELY disagree
8) Disagree. The diversity of nyc is one of it's best assets.
9) Agree. But that falls in with your #4 reason. The taxes of nyc are beyond oppressive is something that you left out.
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