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Old 01-03-2010, 02:29 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 33,733,092 times
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Continuation of the prior thread.

 
Old 01-03-2010, 03:19 PM
 
461 posts, read 1,765,893 times
Reputation: 361
Seventhfloor...commenting on your last post, EVERYONE has a choice where they want to live. No one is putting a gun to their heads telling them to live in NY or migrate to NY. It's their choice to want to live here. They choose to live in NY because its the place to be. But along with being the "it" place to be comes along a hefty price...rent prices and everything else in between.

What really pisses me off is that NYers (PREDOMINATELY LOW-INCOME PEOPLE) have this "ENTITLEMENT" mentality. They feel like they're ENTITLED to affordable housing by any means necessary, even if it means digging into the Landlord's pockets to achieve it. Landlord's belong to the PRIVATE SECTOR, not PUBLIC. If people want a housing handout, go to a City owned and managed housing complex, not an individual owner.

If you can't afford to live in NY then MOVE!!! I love lobster but I can't afford it. It's very pricey. You don't see me going to the restaurant demanding price control on lobster because I like it...I choose a lower-priced item on the menu instead. The same can be said about NY housing. NO ONE IS ENTITLED TO ANYTHING...YOU MUST EARN IT FAIR AND SQUARE.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,154 posts, read 32,681,385 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by victorfox View Post
Seventhfloor...commenting on your last post, EVERYONE has a choice where they want to live. No one is putting a gun to their heads telling them to live in NY or migrate to NY. It's their choice to want to live here. They choose to live in NY because its the place to be. But along with being the "it" place to be comes along a hefty price...rent prices and everything else in between.

What really pisses me off is that NYers (PREDOMINATELY LOW-INCOME PEOPLE) have this "ENTITLEMENT" mentality. They feel like they're ENTITLED to affordable housing by any means necessary, even if it means digging into the Landlord's pockets to achieve it. Landlord's belong to the PRIVATE SECTOR, not PUBLIC. If people want a housing handout, go to a City owned and managed housing complex, not an individual owner.

If you can't afford to live in NY then MOVE!!! I love lobster but I can't afford it. It's very pricey. You don't see me going to the restaurant demanding price control on lobster because I like it...I choose a lower-priced item on the menu instead. The same can be said about NY housing. NO ONE IS ENTITLED TO ANYTHING...YOU MUST EARN IT FAIR AND SQUARE.
i agree with you but the simple fact is this.....what is the incentive to travel to nyc to work a minimum wage job when they can do that in their neighborhood...nobody is gonna pay an $89 a month metrocard when they're only bringing in $700 a month....when u figure that out get back to me
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Old 01-03-2010, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
2,868 posts, read 4,041,452 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
i agree with you but the simple fact is this.....what is the incentive to travel to nyc to work a minimum wage job when they can do that in their neighborhood...nobody is gonna pay an $89 a month metrocard when they're only bringing in $700 a month....when u figure that out get back to me
Actually Seventh, that individual which came here only able to produce an income of $700 a month should have figured that out before they came here.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:03 PM
 
7 posts, read 29,207 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woozle
Lies again. There are no "10,000 Notre Dame grads with trust funds" flooding into New York City. Statistically, the white non-Hispanic population of NYC has likely stayed flat over the last 10 years, after collapsing from close to 90% to 35% of the population in the 2nd half of the 20th century. For every recent white college grad coming into the city, there is an old-time New Yorker leaving the city for greener pastures.

...and the median income and general wealth of the region is going up and up as the old-time NYer leave and the new college grads/"yuppies" comes in. So it's not a bad thing at all.

In Manhattan, it's a mixture of the "Notre Dame trust fund grads" and wealthy Europeans.

Instead of generalizing what you think, you should read the census/demographic stats re: the demographic changes in NY. I'll summarize:


- More than 43,000 city households last year joined the wealth club of those earning $200,000 annually or more, the largest increase in the United States while the $200,000 club dropped on national average.

-In Manhattan, the number of households with incomes below $10,000 a year rose by 529 in 2008 -- while those in the $200,000-a-year class shot up by more than 19,000.

-Other boroughs also saw a spike in the wealthiest households: an increase of more than 6,000 in Brooklyn, 5,300 in Queens, 1,500 in The Bronx and 1,400 on Staten Island.

-In contrast, the average US household had an income of $50,303 last year, the lowest level in 12 years, and down from $52,163 in 2007 while New York City saw an increase.

- Manhattanites got richer, driving the top 5% threshold income to over $857,000 - the wealthiest county in the United States.

- The number of whites living in Harlem more than tripled and helped drive up the median income almost 20 percent.

- Foreign buyers accounted for 37% of Manhattan home purchases, only bested by Central London, driving the average purchase price to over $1.4 million.

- Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens are all part of the 25 counties in the United States with a median home value above $500,000.

-The number of 25-year-olds in Brooklyn holding at least a bachelor’s degree rose by 30%, to 438,568 people

-In Brooklyn Asians accounted for the borough's biggest jump, with a 21% increase, from 185,818 to 224,384 from 2000 to 2007 and the white population grew by 6%, from 1.02 million to 1.08 million

-The number of residents in Sunset Park who do not speak English at home dropped by more than 17 percent



Furthermore, most people living in wonderful suburbs throughout the region like Westchester, areas in Connecticut are middle-class. They just bought before the bubble.

But nobody has argued that middle-class middle-American folk are running into high cost of living cities like New York or Boston, San Francisco etc. in droves, so I have no idea who you're arguing with.

Cities on the level as NY on the world stage have never been middle-America type cities, this isn't a new revelation. NYC would actually be scary if it were like that...like a Phoenix or a Austin

Clearly, people who want the cookie cutter home and a McDonalds and Wal Mart on every corner avoid these exorbitantly priced regions like the plague. Nothing new here. They attract the rich, the youth and the immigrants.

Last edited by aleksander e; 01-03-2010 at 04:27 PM..
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,154 posts, read 32,681,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makossa View Post
Actually Seventh, that individual which came here only able to produce an income of $700 a month should have figured that out before they came here.
what about the people that are here already? im sure you dont expect the entire population of the US to have an MBA do you? its just not feasible....there will always be poor people, rich people, and in-between.
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Old 01-03-2010, 04:12 PM
 
461 posts, read 1,765,893 times
Reputation: 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
i agree with you but the simple fact is this.....what is the incentive to travel to nyc to work a minimum wage job when they can do that in their neighborhood...nobody is gonna pay an $89 a month metrocard when they're only bringing in $700 a month....when u figure that out get back to me

I figured it out for you seventhfloor so now I'm getting back to you. Actually you answered your own question. There is NO incentive to travel and move to NY to get paid minimum wage and expect to survive here....so why even move to NY in the first place and then have the nerve to complain about the high cost of living. It doesn't make sense.

How can anyone move to NY with no or little education or training and expect to make it big here with the cost of living? Don't people research the area before moving? Come on.

If you can't afford NY, then MOVE!!! LEAVE!!! No one is forcing you to stay! NY is not for everyone!
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
2,868 posts, read 4,041,452 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
what about the people that are here already? im sure you dont expect the entire population of the US to have an MBA do you? its just not feasible....there will always be poor people, rich people, and in-between.
I agree with you about people already here being forced out. I was referring to this part of your statement;
what is the incentive to travel to nyc
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,073 posts, read 9,313,800 times
Reputation: 13133
Quote:
Originally Posted by aleksander e View Post
...and the median income and general wealth of the region is going up and up as the old-time NYer leave and the new college grads/"yuppies" comes in. So it's not a bad thing at all.

In Manhattan, it's a mixture of the "Notre Dame trust fund grads" and wealthy Europeans.

Instead of generalizing what you think, you should read the census . I'll summarize:


- More than 43,000 city households last year joined the wealth club of those earning $200,000 annually or more, the largest increase in the United States while the $200,000 club dropped on national average.

-In Manhattan, the number of households with incomes below $10,000 a year rose by 529 in 2008 -- while those in the $200,000-a-year class shot up by more than 19,000.

-Other boroughs also saw a spike in the wealthiest households: an increase of more than 6,000 in Brooklyn, 5,300 in Queens, 1,500 in The Bronx and 1,400 on Staten Island.

-In contrast, the average US household had an income of $50,303 last year, the lowest level in 12 years, and down from $52,163 in 2007.

- The number of whites living in Harlem more than tripled and helped drive up the median income almost 20 percent.

- Foreign buyers accounted for 37% of Manhattan home purchases, only bested by Central London, driving the average purchase price to over $1.4 million.

- Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens are all part of the 25 counties in the United States with a median home value above $500,000.

-The number of residents in Sunset Park who do not speak English at home dropped by more than 17 percent

-The number of 25-year-olds in Brooklyn holding at least a bachelorís degree rose by 30%, to 438,568 people

-In Brooklyn Asians accounted for the borough's biggest jump, with a 21% increase, from 185,818 to 224,384 from 2000 to 2007 and the white population grew by 6%, from 1.02 million to 1.08 million

Furthermore, most people living in wonderful suburbs throughout the region like Westchester, areas in Connecticut are middle-class. They just bought before the bubble.

But nobody has argued that middle-class middle-American folk are running into high cost of living cities like New York or Boston, San Francisco etc. in droves, so I have no idea who you're arguing with.

Cities on the level as NY on the world stage have never been middle-America type cities, this isn't a new revelation. NYC would actually be scary if it were like that...like a Phoenix or a Austin

Clearly, people who want the cookie cutter home and a McDonalds and Wal Mart on every corner avoid these exorbitantly priced regions like the plague. Nothing new here. They attract the rich, the youth and the immigrants.
Census can say what it likes. Real life is a different story. NYC average household salary isn't six figures. There's a huge swath of the population who is not making 100K. Or close to it. Many NYers are hard working, middle of the road folks. And I'm fine with my 'cookie cutter' house, kthxbye.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:21 PM
 
2,681 posts, read 3,574,680 times
Reputation: 3088
In fairness to Seventh Floor, he has a point about how the city does need low income workers. My contention is the neighborhoods towards the edges of the city (Northern Bronx, Outer Queens, Staten Island, Newark,) will eventually fill such a nitch.
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