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Unread 01-30-2010, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Upper East Side, NYC
404 posts, read 771,002 times
Reputation: 261
It is good advice to live on the same side of the city that you work on. (i.e. living on the east side since you will be working on 49th and lex.) I currently have the same situation (work in the east 50s) and live in the upper east. It's a very easy commute, and you will be able to find something in your price range. You could get a decent one bed for 2200, or a great studio. Prices have come way down. I'm currently paying 1900 for a one bed on 84th and third, and frankly will be looking for a better deal when my lease expires. The general rule of thumb with the upper east is, the further east you are from lex, the cheaper it gets. This is due to proximity to the 4,5,6 subway line which runs on lexington. You'll want to stay south of 96th st as well.
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Unread 01-31-2010, 06:02 PM
 
20 posts, read 40,619 times
Reputation: 15
To be honest, the fact that you live on the other side of the country, a broker would def be more helpful mainly because they can do all the leg work for you. And as someone else mentioned, most buildings pay the broker fee anyway, so you really have nothing to lose. Also I would suggest somewhere like financial district, it has the great city feeling, and theres the 4,5,6 train that goes straight up lexington. For about 2100, you can get a decent sized studio about 500-600sq ft in a nice building, maybe even with a view
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Unread 01-31-2010, 06:04 PM
 
7,081 posts, read 22,442,612 times
Reputation: 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyctobk View Post
To be honest, the fact that you live on the other side of the country, a broker would def be more helpful mainly because they can do all the leg work for you. And as someone else mentioned, most buildings pay the broker fee anyway, so you really have nothing to lose. Also I would suggest somewhere like financial district, it has the great city feeling, and theres the 4,5,6 train that goes straight up lexington. For about 2000, you can get a decent sized studio about 500 sq ft in a nice building, maybe even with a view.
The financial district, outside of business hours, is a wasteland. People live there either because it's near work or they can't afford the places they really want to live.
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Unread 02-02-2010, 11:03 AM
 
20 posts, read 40,619 times
Reputation: 15
I wouldnt say its a wasteland, Broadway is usually pretty full and it is walking distance to soho, chinatown, and the east village.
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Unread 02-02-2010, 11:07 AM
 
Location: a fantasy world
3,997 posts, read 4,127,508 times
Reputation: 3450
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyctobk View Post
I wouldnt say its a wasteland.

I would. My friend lived down there and she couldn't wait to move out. She said that it was dead at nights and on the weekend and the subways are always delayed.
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Unread 02-02-2010, 12:20 PM
 
Location: New York City
3,924 posts, read 4,204,392 times
Reputation: 3349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohiogirl22 View Post
I would. My friend lived down there and she couldn't wait to move out. She said that it was dead at nights and on the weekend and the subways are always delayed.
The subways are delayed everywhere on the weekends. At least in the FD you have more than one option.
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Unread 02-08-2010, 09:24 PM
 
82 posts, read 185,272 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
I want a studio or 1 br apt. for between $1800 and $2200/month.
You are looking at studio. Though you might find some 1br at the upper limit, but it will be a dingy hole. You can find a decent studio at $2k+ at newer building with doorman.

Quote:
-- I prefer hardwood floors and pre-war Brownstone styling
I haven't seen anything different than hardwood. I wouldn't recommend pre-war buildings, they are all terrible.

Quote:
--My job is in Midtown on Lexington between 45th and 49th
Then the best place for you is Upper East. There are plenty of vacancies in buildings on 1st and 2nd around UN. You can walk from there, 10-15 min.

Quote:
--I'd like to live close to the density and bustle of the city center, but preferably in a slightly green and leafy neighborhood
I haven't seen anything remotely green in Manhattan, definitely not by CA standards.

Quote:
-- Does finding something that will meet all the above requirements seem feasible? If not, what are the sticking points? Should I be considering other neighborhoods? Is my budget too low?
Your major difficulty will be to satisfy ridiculous requirements of landlords. They will want 4-5x salary to rent ratio, they will ask you bring lots of papers from employer, bank, etc. Then they may demand a guarantor. I've seen all sorts of idiotic requirements, and they don't care, they don't return your calls, don't answer your questions, and they are generally pretty rude. That's the only reason you might want to get a broker. After spending a week visiting several leasing offices and thousand on hotel, I just couldn't stand it anymore. I paid a broker about $3K and he did everything in a few days, I only came signed a contract and was good to move next day. And, no, he didn't find anything I haven't seen, neither it was any cheaper, but I didn't have to deal with all that stupidity.
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Unread 02-08-2010, 10:27 PM
 
Location: a fantasy world
3,997 posts, read 4,127,508 times
Reputation: 3450
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4ever View Post

I haven't seen anything different than hardwood. I wouldn't recommend pre-war buildings, they are all terrible.
Have you been to every prewar building? I live in a pre war and I like it. Nice thick walls a I even have a working fire place.
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Unread 02-08-2010, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Bed-stuy/Clinton Hill
954 posts, read 1,204,435 times
Reputation: 463
I'm assuming by slightly green you mean like a tree lined block? you would definately find that Uptown, Upper West Side, East side, Morning Side Heights, West Harlem (Hamilton Heights), and an abundance of parks. Not the green that you find in "Cali" Sprawl but green nonetheless, and many prewar buildings are among some of the best housing stock in the city. Especially if its below 7 stories. Good luck!
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