U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-31-2010, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Astoria, Queens, you know the scene
750 posts, read 2,137,803 times
Reputation: 598

Advertisements

I think Astoria is probably as diverse and welcoming to all races, classes and religions as you'll get in the entire world. As a Filipino dude, I couldn't imagine living in an ethnically homogenous neighborhood, which is one of the main reasons I chose to live in Astoria. I've lived in predominantly white American, Colombian, Chinese / Korean, and Filipino / Mexican neighborhoods and never felt as comfortable as I have in Astoria - even in Woodside where there are a ton of Filipinos! When I see groups of people on the street of one race or pictures of gatherings where everyone is one race, I just wonder how they haven't made friends with at least 1 person outside of their race to the point that they're not afraid to invite them to hang out. I just can't relate to that lifestyle and truthfully I feel sorry for them even if its not their intention to exclude others since many of us are raised to only interact with people from our own race or culture. There's definitely nothing wrong with it if that's what makes you feel comfortable, but personally, I thank God I'm not one of those people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-01-2010, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Crown Heights
965 posts, read 2,116,082 times
Reputation: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
I think I heard someone say once, the further away you get from a subway station the more racist it tends to get. It seems to be true...
hmmmm, you know what? Alot of neighborhoods tend to be much more homogenous the further they are away from subway lines. Except the really expensive areas of Manhattan, which are close to subways but have become much more ethnically homogenous in recent years. But even if they aren't diverse neighborhoods, constantly using the subway puts you in constant contact with other groups. Many people may not think they are racist, but since they are around people who may look the same way and have the same views on things; some of the things they say are crazy but they don't even realize it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 04:47 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,535,682 times
Reputation: 1082
My only issue with some of the formerly white, working class ethnic enclaves in NYC is that people have long held perceptions that blacks are ghetto, undesirable tenants who'll bring down the neighborhood. This was the basis for much of the white flight in the 60s-70s and racial divisiveness in the 80s-90s. If you are younger than 35 or did not live in NYC until the 2000s, your perception is that NYC is a great big melting pot where everybody gets along.
White flight caused many neighborhoods to gentrify and a lot of the racial problems went with them. However, if you lived through the old times and experienced racism first hand, or your family members or friends did, it isn't so easy to shake off.
As for homogeneous black neighborhoods, (i.e., SEQueens, Bed Stuy, East Flatbush, Bklyn, NEBronx) they are not necessarily the 'hood, as people on these forums would have you believe. In the 50s-70s, when middle class black families wanted to buy houses, they were steered to these neighborhoods. My parents could not have bought a house in Astoria, or many other places, when they bought their house in SEQueens in 1968.
Regarding Astoria, some posters have mentioned that black people have had a difficult time renting there. I believe those occurrences may be mired in perception, since many of the black people in Astoria and the surrounding LIC areas live in the projects. So to the property owner in Astoria, a black person = bad behavior, crime, disrespectful to property, etc. The problem is that people generalize. I could be the perfect tenant or homeowner but that perception may still there. Being Jewish + Asian would likely not present this problem for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Katonah, NY
21,199 posts, read 20,232,724 times
Reputation: 22104
Thank you all for your input. I guess these things never occured to me also because while I lived in Astoria, my roommate was African American. Our landlord was from Poland (they were lovely people) and our neighbors were from everywhere. It was a relatively new condo development that we moved into. We never had any problems. In our area - there were people of all races. We moved into the area in 1998 so I'm sure it was already much different than it had been before. Also, since a lot of the people in our development were immigrants, they probably didn't have preconceived notions based on living in NYC - they might have brought them from wherever they were from but they weren't based on NYC living. I've never really thought about that before.
I also think that now, after reading what everyone else in this forum has had to say about Astoria - that Astoria is a relatively large area and diversity varies by area. I lived at the Broadway stop and it was very diverse. I wouldn't even say that there was a Greek majority there. I couldn't even tell you if there was a majority!
Thank you all for your input!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
470 posts, read 965,294 times
Reputation: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewdrop93 View Post
After reading some of the posts lately - I found myself wondering about some things. A lot of the people who are thinking about moving here mention their ethnicity and want to move to an area where it won't prove problematic. I think that this is a totally valid concern. However, as a person who has been living here for 12 years - I have never lived or worked in an area where this was an issue. I'm mixed - half Asian, half Jewish. I'm not saying that I've never witnessed or been subjected to any sort of prejudice in my life - but in NYC, it just never seems to be an issue. I don't really pay attention to what color or creed people are - and it doesn't seem that most other people do either. When people ask questions about areas where they will safe being non-white - I always tell them that it's not an issue at all in the majority of NYC. Am I wrong? I know that in other cities - race or creed can be a huge issue - but I never thought that it was here. I'm just curious as to what everyone else's experiences have been here. I've lived in Astoria and the Upper East Side - and they were very diverse, very safe areas. Am I just ignorant of what really goes in NYC? I'm interested to hear your thoughts!
I'm always amused when people state that they have "never witnessed" prejudice "in their lives."
Right.
You witnessed numerous acts that reflect the racism and prejudice in our society and for some reason that matters only you, you chose ignore it or believe that it was something else.

Not dealing w/ prejudice is just as bad,if not worse, than being prejudiced.
Prejudiced people of any race need to be called on their prejudice until they learn that their ideas and attitudes need changing,not the world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Katonah, NY
21,199 posts, read 20,232,724 times
Reputation: 22104
Um... maybe you want to reread my post... I said "I'm not saying that I've never witnessed or been subjected to any sort of prejudice in my life" which means I HAVE witnessed it. I have been the target of it as well.
I'm always amused when people can't read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 02:31 PM
 
9,341 posts, read 24,805,552 times
Reputation: 4456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biskit View Post
I think Astoria is probably as diverse and welcoming to all races, classes and religions as you'll get in the entire world.
Really?

How many Torah-observant Jews, or, for that matter, non-observant, secular Jews, live in Astoria, would you guess?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 02:44 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,535,682 times
Reputation: 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewdrop93 View Post
Thank you all for your input. I guess these things never occured to me also because while I lived in Astoria, my roommate was African American. Our landlord was from Poland (they were lovely people) and our neighbors were from everywhere. It was a relatively new condo development that we moved into. We never had any problems. In our area - there were people of all races. We moved into the area in 1998 so I'm sure it was already much different than it had been before. Also, since a lot of the people in our development were immigrants, they probably didn't have preconceived notions based on living in NYC - they might have brought them from wherever they were from but they weren't based on NYC living. I've never really thought about that before.
I also think that now, after reading what everyone else in this forum has had to say about Astoria - that Astoria is a relatively large area and diversity varies by area. I lived at the Broadway stop and it was very diverse. I wouldn't even say that there was a Greek majority there. I couldn't even tell you if there was a majority!
Thank you all for your input!
Based on my experiences, non-American born people do not have the same preconceived notions that Americans have of black people. When I spoke with a European friend about it, he told me that he did not grow up having feelings about blacks one way or another so he was neutral.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 03:03 PM
 
10,707 posts, read 20,886,149 times
Reputation: 8256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
Really?

How many Torah-observant Jews, or, for that matter, non-observant, secular Jews, live in Astoria, would you guess?
Plenty, according to this article.
In Western Queens, New Blood Raises Hopes for Jewish Revitalization | The Jewish Week (BETA)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2010, 03:19 PM
 
9,341 posts, read 24,805,552 times
Reputation: 4456
Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgrl View Post
Based on my experiences, non-American born people do not have the same preconceived notions that Americans have of black people. When I spoke with a European friend about it, he told me that he did not grow up having feelings about blacks one way or another so he was neutral.

Interesting turn, as it was Catholic Spain and Protestant England that brought such skin color bigotry to the New World.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top