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Old 10-25-2017, 05:13 PM
 
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As someone who is hearing impaired, I actually have an easier time understanding people speak who have distinct and heavy accents versus standard newsreporter "proper" english. Not really sure why that is. Someone told me once I had a Jersey accent and I was mortified lol. It's funny because back in the late 90s when I was in college I was enrolled in a pre-summer program for low-income students and one of our classes was Speech Improvement which basically was trying to get rid of all of our supposed low-income accents to prepare us for college, but the teacher had the biggest accent ever and our final in the class was to do a rap! kid you not. I was also mortified actually having to do that in front of a class, but i guess everyone was supportive.
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Old 10-25-2017, 05:56 PM
 
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I know a guy, about 55 years old, from the Bronx, who I think of as having a very distinctive accent. Imagine my surprise when I heard the voice of this other guy (60ish years old) also from the Bronx, who does the same distinctive thing with his voice. It's like there's a little rolling of the tongue in there. I can't identify it or figure it out, but it got me thinking that many it's a very local Bronx accent for people who grew up there 40 to 60 years ago.

The second guy is actually on this youtube video, starting at about 1:00


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDjWRVXKhu4
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Old 10-25-2017, 06:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
That "RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR" sound is a white thing or people trying to sound white! It isn't native New York speech, nor is it southern.
BS, I work with plenty of black people from the hood and they tend to pronounce the Rs, even if they don't stress it

It might vary from person to person, but saying "water" is not a white thing
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Old 03-04-2018, 10:15 PM
NDL
Status: "Between Here And There" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Gaston County
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Not even remotely valid now, and even back in the day probably not. My grandpa was an Irish-American Brooklynite and I doubt he would have sounded much different if he was from Queens.
In the 1970's-80's, Italians from southeastern Queens sounded a little different than Italians from Bensonhurst, Gravesend, etc. It'd be hard for me to elaborate as to how, and no, I am not referring to the Bklyn practice of replacing a "t" in lieu of "th" (e.g. wit, instead of with), or the marriage of two words into one: "What's the matter witchchew? (with you)"
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
BS, I work with plenty of black people from the hood and they tend to pronounce the Rs, even if they don't stress it

It might vary from person to person, but saying "water" is not a white thing
I don't understand what you mean about the "rrrr" thing, or "pronouncing the R's".
Like in which words?
R's at the beginning of a word or at the end?
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Old 03-05-2018, 10:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
In the 1970's-80's, Italians from southeastern Queens sounded a little different than Italians from Bensonhurst, Gravesend, etc. It'd be hard for me to elaborate as to how, and no, I am not referring to the Bklyn practice of replacing a "t" in lieu of "th" (e.g. wit, instead of with), or the marriage of two words into one: "What's the matter witchchew? (with you)"
Well I can see it being a thing back then

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoshanarose View Post
I don't understand what you mean about the "rrrr" thing, or "pronouncing the R's".
Like in which words?
R's at the beginning of a word or at the end?
The end.

Last edited by l1995; 03-06-2018 at 12:21 AM..
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