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Old 03-03-2011, 11:09 AM
 
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Someone please, very simply explain haha. Very confused.
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Old 03-03-2011, 05:54 PM
 
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A city is like a city anywhere and in NY the smallest city is Sherrill, which has around 3000 people. A village is like a small city, but also gets some duplicate services like police coverage for example from the town it is in. A town is like a township in other states and tend to be bigger in land size. A hamlet is a small community within a town.
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Hamburg, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
A city is like a city anywhere and in NY the smallest city is Sherrill, which has around 3000 people. A village is like a small city, but also gets some duplicate services like police coverage for example from the town it is in. A town is like a township in other states and tend to be bigger in land size. A hamlet is a small community within a town.
This is pretty much spot on. I would just add that you will see towns & villages with the same name. For instance I live in the town of Hamburg but there is also a village of Hamburg. This is where it can get confusing .......... the village is part of the town but not all of the town is part of the village. The best way to describe it is the village is typically the centralized, downtown area of the town while the town is the village area plus the outlying areas.

Its really not that confusing once you live here for a bit but one thing to be on the lookout for is that many villages have higher taxes than if you lived outside the village but still within the town. The reason being is because if you reside in the village they hit you with taxes for the village and the town (outside of the village area you dont have to pay taxes to the village). Just something to be aware of if you were thinking of buying before living here for awhile.
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:56 PM
 
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In other states these divisions are different. NY town and villages are very confusing and don't make sense the way they are today.
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Old 03-04-2011, 05:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
In other states these divisions are different. NY town and villages are very confusing and don't make sense the way they are today.
It can be confusing, if you aren't use to it. It does go back to an earlier time.
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Old 03-04-2011, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Western New York
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Yes, if you think of the village as the original heart of the town and the rest grew up around it, that's the best way to describe the relationship between village and town.

City > Town > Village > Hamlet

I live in a hamlet. It's really a small collection of houses that may or may not be slightly set apart from the "village" part of town. In my case, you drive through farm fields and forest for a couple of miles until you suddenly turn up in our hamlet. It's technically part of the town and we use the name of the town on our mailing address, but we usually have to specify our hamlet's name when telling people where we live, or else they'll think we live closer to the heart of town.

Hope that helped!
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Old 03-05-2011, 09:03 PM
 
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Default Understanding the geography of New York

In case you are unfamiliar with the local geography:

What people refer to colloquially as "towns" are actually villages and hamlets, which are within actual towns; and, because villages and hamlets are referred to as "towns", then, many times, the error is compounded when actual towns are referred to as "townships".

Also, many colloquially refer to a "downtown business district" in a hamlet as a "village".

NYS Geographic Glossary may be of some help to you in understanding the geography of New York.

You can get a fact sheet for any city, village or hamlet in New York by going here American FactFinder and input the name of the city, village or hamlet for "city/town" (leave out the ZIP Code) and New York for "State", and then click "GO".

You'll get a lot of demographic, and some economic, statistics for the city, village or hamlet you selected, and if you click on "Reference map" (it's on the right hand side), you'll get a map.

You can find out in which community (city, village or CDP) a place is actually located, which is oftentimes different from the community named in that place's mailing address, by using the Census Bureau's online address search function. (CDP, or Census Designated Place, is the Census Bureau equivalent for a hamlet in New York State.)

And, very importantly, among other things, the Census Bureau's online address search function also indicates in which school district a place is located.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:37 AM
 
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As a general rule, at least as I understand it, a town has a church while a village does not. A city has a city hall, and while a town may have a town hall, they do not serve the same purpose. These differences may apply more to rural or underdeveloped areas than larger populated areas.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:42 AM
 
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In New York, a town is made of up of hamlets and or villages, the latter is self governing to an extent while hamlets are under government of the town. Cities are more autonomous than villages and are generally larger in size.

Places in New York outside of cities are generally referred to by the name of the hamlet or village. For example, the hamlet I live in is Baldwin, within the Town of Hempstead (not to be confused with Hempstead, a village in the Town of Hempstead), and thus the municipality is referred to as Baldwin.
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Old 09-17-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Summerville SC Historic District
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It all has to do with the form of incorporation.

But beware, because if you live in a village within a town/city, you could likely being paying taxes for living in BOTH.
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