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Old 07-06-2012, 01:39 PM
Status: "Game recognized game from the start" (set 24 days ago)
 
30,352 posts, read 35,099,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RollsRoyce View Post
I do think Syracuse is big enough and has a variation of suburbs to notice an obvious difference in demographics, topography, home style, zoning, etc. For an example, I know some people who hate the northern suburbs because of its sprawling nature, flat land, and various other reasons. I know people from the northern suburbs and western suburbs that detest the eastern suburbs because they have a perception that people there are wealthy, snobbish, and are aggressive drivers. Despite the more compact nature of the Syracuse metro area, I don't think the average person has as much exposure to different sides of town aside from shopping trips and doctor's appointments. I had a friend in college that was from Elbridge and played lacrosse. She played at Jamesville-Dewitt (a relatively affluent suburban school district east of Syracuse) and several of the students had never heard of Elbridge let alone knew it was only 30 minutes to the west. There is also a degree of unfamilarity between residents that reside in city and suburbs. This isn't unique to Syracuse.
I absolutely agree with this. People would be surprised by how many people really do not venture too far from their set of suburbs or part of town and then use that to form an opinion on the area at large. Like Rolls said, this isn't just Syracuse area specific either. Even by my own admission, there are parts of the city of Syracuse that I never been in until after high school or college and realized that there are more solid areas of Syracuse than the media or others would have people to believe. Same with some area suburbs. I think this is why some people have the attitudes that they have, in part, because they probably do not really know as much about the area they live in as they think they do. I have been able to find things out by just driving around the area and taking an interest in seeing what is in different towns in the area.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:17 PM
 
1,501 posts, read 1,823,847 times
Reputation: 1458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
I don't think or haven't said that Hudson Valley is much better than other areas in NY state. Just a place I knew about because I lived there for a good number of years and left. Some NYC influences perk it up a bit and make it more interesting, but also more expensive. Their imput has revitalized some of the cities in the Hudson Valley, which is a good thing.
I don't want to appear to be knocking the area. Enough said. There's good and bad, everybody can decide for themselves.

That's a fair statement. The influx of creative types from NYC has definitely helped revitalize places like Beacon, Hudson, and to a much lesser degree Peekskill, Kingston and Poughkeepsie. The presence of MetroNorth and the close proximity to NYC has certainly aided the transformation of some communities.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Oneida
2,498 posts, read 1,517,345 times
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I am, both in real life and on the forum, constantly amazed how little people from this area get around.

I understand not everyone gets around like I do. I spent lunch today BSing about Iowa with a truck driver here from Kansas about some of the roads there. And traffic in Boston and the city. Great fun. But not everybody gads about like me.

But holy crap the people around here have like 5 mile shock collars on. Here at CD not very long ago a heavy poster with claimed tons of education stated they hadn't heard of a Village. This was a fairly major Village with a fairly important school and so forth. They said they had never heard of it. Damm. 25 miles from where they have lived all there lives. Frankly if I haven't heard of something I'll either ask or keep my yap shut.

From say Utica to Syracuse I've at least been to every place larger then a village and many hamlets. I've been to everything you guys talk about. We certainly disagree about what we are seeing and thats fine but I've at least been there.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:32 PM
Status: "Game recognized game from the start" (set 24 days ago)
 
30,352 posts, read 35,099,529 times
Reputation: 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean® View Post
I am, both in real life and on the forum, constantly amazed how little people from this area get around.

I understand not everyone gets around like I do. I spent lunch today BSing about Iowa with a truck driver here from Kansas about some of the roads there. And traffic in Boston and the city. Great fun. But not everybody gads about like me.

But holy crap the people around here have like 5 mile shock collars on. Here at CD not very long ago a heavy poster with claimed tons of education stated they hadn't heard of a Village. This was a fairly major Village with a fairly important school and so forth. They said they had never heard of it. Damm. 25 miles from where they have lived all there lives. Frankly if I haven't heard of something I'll either ask or keep my yap shut.

From say Utica to Syracuse I've at least been to every place larger then a village and many hamlets. I've been to everything you guys talk about. We certainly disagree about what we are seeing and thats fine but I've at least been there.
Who was this? Some places look better than others and I don't know if people necessarily disagree as much as you may thin(depending on the community I guess).
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Oneida
2,498 posts, read 1,517,345 times
Reputation: 843
Its not important but I will say it wasn't you.
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Old 07-06-2012, 03:04 PM
Status: "Game recognized game from the start" (set 24 days ago)
 
30,352 posts, read 35,099,529 times
Reputation: 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean® View Post
Its not important but I will say it wasn't you.
I know. I'm just a geography nerd, that is surprised that someone would not know about a community like that.
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Old 07-06-2012, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Oneida
2,498 posts, read 1,517,345 times
Reputation: 843
I was pretty floored myself. The town was Clinton BTW.

Lottsa little places I haven't spent a ton of time. Lottsa places I've been and have no real opinion of.

But never heard of?? I know its bad around here but its worse then I thought.

Another thing I notice about people around here. Where ever and whatever it is they hate it. To hot, to cold, to windy, to much crime, to much traffic and on and on. Have you ever been?? NO!!!!!!!! And I never will cause its to hot, to cold..............

I wanna see every place. I may not like it but I wanna see it. Except like Grozny or something, no need of getting killed or anything.
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Old 07-06-2012, 03:38 PM
 
1,392 posts, read 696,563 times
Reputation: 1165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
Your post is a bit defensive. Let's all relax and take a breath! I am a NY'er originally from NY state and having been away for 20 years, new to this area, feel what I feel, see what I see through my own perceptions and eyes. Just my feelings, not an absolute truth about the area or any area.

I'm not interested in South Beach, Miami or Vegas. I didn't mention Albany, another poster did. I am not "unhappy" here. Hasn't been that long, but there are things here that are quite different and who knows if I can adjust. Not sure, just being honest.
I find it quite insulting when someone tells me not to move to Syracuse, and I'd be better off in Vegas or somewhere outside the Northeast (where I've lived nearly all of my life), because I'm asking a question that highlights some negative aspect of the city. A typical conversation:

Me: Not too crazy about the shopping in the area, wish it had some better stores
Them: If you're looking for Neiman Marcus, perhaps Syracuse is not for you.
Me: Huh? No, not Neiman Marcus, just some more appealing stores, like REI, Whole Foods, Costco, etc. I really like those stores, they have great products.
Them: Well, they're not here. We have Wegmans, and that suits us just fine. We're happy with what we got and we don't want this area to turn into LA, NYC, or some other "flashy place". Maybe you should look somewhere else.
Me:

So frustrating to talk to some of the people here (and I mean city-data, not just SYR). Some jackass lady over in the Buffalo forum is trying to ban people from posting positive things about Buffalo in her thread. It goes both ways. The platitudes and assumptions about other places in the US, places that they have clearly never been to, is pretty simplistic and not at all true. I've had arguments with people that Raleigh is not that religious (its only 40% religious), most of Upstate is more religious (48%) and Pittsburgh is a very religious town (65%). But of course, they'll tell me (who lived there) that its SUCH a religious, Baptist, preachy type of area. Syracuse is younger than Raleigh (33 vs. 34 median age), but I am told to live in a more youthful, less family oriented place like Raleigh

So listen to yourself, and believe what you see with your eyes and listen to what your ears tell you. Believe your perception and not stereotypes based on outdated and false notions by some of the people on here who probably live in a cave and somehow have internet access.
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Old 07-06-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
654 posts, read 1,185,739 times
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Statement-I do think Syracuse is big enough and has a variation of suburbs to notice a subtle to obvious difference in demographics, topography, home style, zoning, etc.

Reply-Of course there are some differences but "not-such-major" differences that I would ever feel uncomfortable in any of the suburbs; minus the city.

Statement-For an example, I know some people who hate the northern suburbs because of its sprawling nature, flat land, and various other reasons.

Reply-Personally I don't dislike any Suburb. Yeah, dislike the northern suburbs if someone wants too but that leaves alot of other suburban locations to choose from; no need to write-off the entire Metro area. Sure, northern suburbs are spread-out, have rather flat land, a basically middleclass area. I guess its cheaper and easier for builders to want to build homes in that type landmass. At Metro Syracuse if you don't like flat land then you can buy a home in middle-class Camillus or Fairmount or Onondaga Hill or Lafayette or Marcellus where there are hills or if you want to spend more money, you can buy in Manlius or Pompey or Jamesville; so you have many choices; again, no need to write-off the entire Metro. Topography should not preclude you from moving to anywhere in the Metro area. If you only drive thru Liverpool-Clay-Cicero and judge the whole Metro area (its all flat), that's too quick/a false impression=you're not doing any kind of in-depth research.

Statement-I know people from the northern suburbs and western suburbs that detest the eastern suburbs because they have a perception that people there are wealthy, demanding, and are aggressive drivers.

Reply-That's not my belief. I'm sure many of them do have more wealth than I do but that doesn't matter to me. Wealthy and "upper-class" people don't have a "corner" on being demanding or obnoxious or aggressive; there's plenty of middle-class people who can be just as uncivil/annoying//self-centered/offensive/unpleasant.

Statement-Despite the more compact nature of the Syracuse metro area, I don't think the average person has as much exposure to different sides of town aside from shopping trips and doctor's appointments.

Reply-That is not me. I try to be very informed about the whole Metro area. If what you say is true, then I guess the average person just isn't interested in detailed/thorough knowledge about the Metro area.

Statement-I had a friend in college that was from Elbridge and played lacrosse. She played a game against Jamesville-Dewitt (a relatively affluent suburban school district east of Syracuse) and several of the students had never heard of Elbridge let alone knew it was only 30 minutes to the west.

Reply-What?? Not knowing villages/towns "that" close to ones' own location is unbelievable to me=although I believe what you are saying. I know about towns and where they are located and information about them, all across Upstate New York and New England; but I guess I'm interested in having that knowledge.

Statement-There is also a degree of unfamilarity between residents that reside in city and suburban areas.

Reply-Sure. I think that's true. Working with 200=300 people at my place of employment, I don't recall anyone telling me that they live in the city; people from everywhere else: Oswego, Fulton, Waterloo, Seneca Falls, Morrisville, New Woodstock, Canastota, Chittenango, Cleveland, Constaintia, West Monroe, Hastings, Pennellville, Phoenix, Cato, Skaneatles, Marcellus, all the suburbs but I don't recall hearing= I live in "the city". I agree, for whatever reason there is the impression of unfamilarity between city and suburban residents.

Statement-There are certain communities and suburbs that I would chose not to live in. There is nothing inherently wrong with the vast majority of the communities in CNY. For some people, however, what most of us would consider to be minor or non-existent criteria for relocating to a new community are major deciding factors. Some of this may be related to preferences based on religion, ethnicity, politics, educational attainment, architecture (new construction vs old construction), access to public transportation and proximity to work.

Reply-Yes!! People need to do their research. Research. Research! Most differences between suburbs are not that big a deal to me. I can't see why small differences between the suburbs mean very much to people. Lots of community choices. If you're wealthy or upper-class maybe you want to live in Manlius or Skaneatles or Fayetteville. If you're middle-class you have so many suburbs to choose from, north/west/east/south/countryside. If you don't have a lot of money there's even some places where you could afford to live. If you are Italian or Irish or Jewish or German or Polish or whatever, maybe your preference will be to live where there are similar communities=those considerations don't matter to me. Yeah. Those are differences but I don't see them as major. I don't need to live in a all-same cookie-cutter neighborhood. Any minor differences should not dissuade anyone from relocating to the Syracuse area if they think they like this region. No one should simply move here without doing adequate in-depth research; if a person doesn't do adequate research, all they have to do is look in the mirror. Don't have the idea that if you've lived in Paris for a long time, you'll be okay moving to Syracuse. Do your research and then ponder all the huge differences there will be. Try to determine "ahead-of-your-move" (don't make an impulsive move to any new place and complain later) whether you'll be able to mentally "handle" the certain changes/differences you will definitely encounter.

Statement-You can easily have two communities that look simliar on paper - above average income, good schools, and nice homes yet are significantly different.

Reply-I don't see major "meaningful" (in my mind) differences between say for example Manlius, Skaneatles, upscale Pompey, Fayetteville. Being middle-class I could just as easily live in Camillus, Baldwinsville, Liverpool, Clay, Cicero, Brewerton, parts of North Syracuse & parts of East Syracuse and be happy/content/satisfied; those suburbs are all the same to me. Hypothetically, if I moved from Brewerton to Camillus I would see very little meaningful difference. If I didn't like living in Brewerton, I don't believe moving to Camillus would change my feelings or contentment very much about the area=that's just me.

The only meaningful qualities to me are that: employment is available within a reasonable distance, the housing stock was built sometime from the 1960's to the present, residents are civil-responsible-respectable-middle class, absence of red-necks & wise-guys & obnoxious attitudes, well maintained suburb, no gang activity; not sure about anything else. Those are the important aspects to me.

grdnrman

Last edited by grdnrman; 07-06-2012 at 05:31 PM..
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Old 07-07-2012, 04:43 AM
 
4,948 posts, read 4,715,828 times
Reputation: 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
I find it quite insulting when someone tells me not to move to Syracuse, and I'd be better off in Vegas or somewhere outside the Northeast (where I've lived nearly all of my life), because I'm asking a question that highlights some negative aspect of the city. A typical conversation:

Me: Not too crazy about the shopping in the area, wish it had some better stores
Them: If you're looking for Neiman Marcus, perhaps Syracuse is not for you.
Me: Huh? No, not Neiman Marcus, just some more appealing stores, like REI, Whole Foods, Costco, etc. I really like those stores, they have great products.
Them: Well, they're not here. We have Wegmans, and that suits us just fine. We're happy with what we got and we don't want this area to turn into LA, NYC, or some other "flashy place". Maybe you should look somewhere else.
Me:

So frustrating to talk to some of the people here (and I mean city-data, not just SYR). Some jackass lady over in the Buffalo forum is trying to ban people from posting positive things about Buffalo in her thread. It goes both ways. The platitudes and assumptions about other places in the US, places that they have clearly never been to, is pretty simplistic and not at all true. I've had arguments with people that Raleigh is not that religious (its only 40% religious), most of Upstate is more religious (48%) and Pittsburgh is a very religious town (65%). But of course, they'll tell me (who lived there) that its SUCH a religious, Baptist, preachy type of area. Syracuse is younger than Raleigh (33 vs. 34 median age), but I am told to live in a more youthful, less family oriented place like Raleigh

So listen to yourself, and believe what you see with your eyes and listen to what your ears tell you. Believe your perception and not stereotypes based on outdated and false notions by some of the people on here who probably live in a cave and somehow have internet access.
Believe your perceptions. Spot on as far as I'm concerned. When you sense something, you can trust it, esp. if you've been around the block, so to speak,more than a few times. As you start to test your perception/assumption, still not sure, but other people reiterating it, then, bam, bingo, you've got it then! I felt a things initially and asked my husband what he felt. Same exact thing. And, my hubby is a regular guy, not into "vibes" or anything.

If you hear repeated themes about an area, any area too, you're onto something. People saying the same things. At least you go in with your eyes wide open. Example)Phoenix metro. It's hot. Everyone in the universe knows it's hot, but on that forum, in the middle of summer, right about now, the joggers will come out. They'll tell us how they went jogging and loved it, felt nothing out of the ordinary jogging in 100 degree morning heat. Or afternoon heat. ANd, how the dry heat of 112 beats the humid heat of 90. Let me tell you, Phoenix is the hottest place on earth, blow dryer in your face heat from late May to late October. But, the worst part is that there's no reprieve. None, nadda, till October. Nights are 86-88 range and you are basically in A/C for 4 1/2 -5 months. And, getting hotter statistically. I went to Weatherunderground and saw the numbers. Runs of 110's-112's are common now, but not in the 90's when I moved there. But, the denial runs thick...

But, Wegman's is kinda like Church here, which is very amusing and I get lots of humor out of it.You can't insult Wegmans or the sky might come down is how I feel. I personally don't care for it. I find it very maze like and has horrible flow. Everything is in different areas. DIfferent freezers everywhere, the "healthy"stuff can't be integrated with the regular aisle stuff either. I get my healthy stuff at Walmarts and save a ton. Okay by me. I loved Trader Joes and will have to commute monthly for that. ANyways, back to my cave...Hehe.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 07-07-2012 at 04:55 AM..
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