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Old 02-07-2019, 07:03 AM
 
56,294 posts, read 80,484,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
In regards to the reduction in Aid and Incentives for Municipalities funding for some North Country communities: https://www.wwnytv.com/story/3981689...os-budget-plan
https://wwny.images.worldnow.com/lib...53466a24f6.pdf
An opinion piece from the Utica Observer-Dispatch about this topic: https://www.uticaod.com/opinion/2019...st-be-restored
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:21 AM
 
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A list that includes Buffalo and Rochester...

New figures show that poverty is (slightly) less of a problem in Buffalo area than in U.S. as a whole

The poverty rate for the Buffalo area is a small bit better than the corresponding national rate, according to new statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Slightly more than one-tenth of the families in both the local area and the entire country are officially classified as poor: 10.3 percent in the two-county Buffalo metro, 10.5 percent in the United States as a whole.

Business First has isolated the family poverty rates for the nation's 53 major metropolitan areas (those with populations in excess of 1 million), using data from the five-year version of the Census Bureau's 2017 American Community Survey (ACS).

The 2017 ACS is the current source of official data at the metropolitan level. The poverty line, as defined by the Census Bureau, varies according to the size of a family and the age of the householder, the person who is the family's primary source of income.

The Washington, D.C., area, which spreads into Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia, has the lowest family poverty rate of any major metro, 5.6 percent, while the worst metropolitan poverty can be found in the Memphis area. The family poverty rate for the latter metro is 14.5 percent.

The Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls metro, as it is officially known, encompasses Erie and Niagara counties. It is tied with Tampa-St. Petersburg and Oklahoma City for 33rd place at 10.3 percent.

Here are the full national standings for major metros, ranked from the lowest to the highest family poverty rate. Each area is listed with its official metropolitan name, its population and its rate:

1. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (metro population: 6,090,196) has a family poverty rate of 5.6%.

2. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA (metro population: 1,969,897) has a family poverty rate of 5.7%.

3. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI (metro population: 3,526,149) has a family poverty rate of 5.9%.

4. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA (metro population: 4,641,820) has a family poverty rate of 6.4%.

5. Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA (metro population: 3,735,216) has a family poverty rate of 6.7%.

6. Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH (metro population: 4,771,936) has a family poverty rate of 6.9%.

7. (tie) Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO (metro population: 2,798,684) has a family poverty rate of 7.0%.

7. (tie) Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD (metro population: 2,792,050) has a family poverty rate of 7.0%.

7. (tie) Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT (metro population: 1,213,123) has a family poverty rate of 7.0%.

10. Salt Lake City, UT (metro population: 1,170,057) has a family poverty rate of 7.1%.

11. Raleigh, NC (metro population: 1,273,985) has a family poverty rate of 7.8%.

12. (tie) Austin-Round Rock, TX (metro population: 2,000,590) has a family poverty rate of 7.9%.

12. (tie) Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI (metro population: 1,039,182) has a family poverty rate of 7.9%.

14. (tie) Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA (metro population: 2,382,037) has a family poverty rate of 8.0%.

14. (tie) Pittsburgh, PA (metro population: 2,348,143) has a family poverty rate of 8.0%.

16. Kansas City, MO-KS (metro population: 2,088,830) has a family poverty rate of 8.1%.

17. Richmond, VA (metro population: 1,270,158) has a family poverty rate of 8.4%.

18. St. Louis, MO-IL (metro population: 2,804,998) has a family poverty rate of 8.8%.

19. Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD (metro population: 6,065,644) has a family poverty rate of 8.9%.

20. Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC (metro population: 1,717,708) has a family poverty rate of 9.0%.

21. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN (metro population: 1,830,410) has a family poverty rate of 9.2%.

22. Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (metro population: 2,156,723) has a family poverty rate of 9.3%.

23. Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN (metro population: 1,278,203) has a family poverty rate of 9.4%.

24. (tie) San Diego-Carlsbad, CA (metro population: 3,283,665) has a family poverty rate of 9.5%.

24. (tie) Providence-Warwick, RI-MA (metro population: 1,613,154) has a family poverty rate of 9.5%.

26. Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI (metro population: 9,549,229) has a family poverty rate of 9.7%.

27. Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN (metro population: 1,989,032) has a family poverty rate of 9.9%.

28. (tie) Columbus, OH (metro population: 2,023,695) has a family poverty rate of 10.0%.

28. (tie) Rochester, NY (metro population: 1,080,653) has a family poverty rate of 10.0%.

30. (tie) Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX (metro population: 7,104,415) has a family poverty rate of 10.1%.

30. (tie) Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC (metro population: 2,427,024) has a family poverty rate of 10.1%.

32. Jacksonville, FL (metro population: 1,447,884) has a family poverty rate of 10.2%.

33. (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL (metro population: 2,978,209) has a family poverty rate of 10.3%.

33. (tie) Oklahoma City, OK (metro population: 1,353,504) has a family poverty rate of 10.3%.

33. (tie) Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, NY (metro population: 1,136,670) has a family poverty rate of 10.3%.

36. (tie) Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA (metro population: 5,700,990) has a family poverty rate of 10.4%.

36. (tie) Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI (metro population: 1,575,101) has a family poverty rate of 10.4%.

38. (tie) New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (metro population: 20,192,042) has a family poverty rate of 10.6%.

38. (tie) Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, CA (metro population: 2,268,005) has a family poverty rate of 10.6%.

40. (tie) Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV (metro population: 2,112,436) has a family poverty rate of 11.0%.

40. (tie) Cleveland-Elyria, OH (metro population: 2,062,764) has a family poverty rate of 11.0%.

42. Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (metro population: 4,561,038) has a family poverty rate of 11.4%.

43. (tie) Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI (metro population: 4,304,613) has a family poverty rate of 11.6%.

43. (tie) Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL (metro population: 2,390,859) has a family poverty rate of 11.6%.

45. San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX (metro population: 2,377,507) has a family poverty rate of 11.7%.

46. Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX (metro population: 6,636,208) has a family poverty rate of 11.9%.

47. (tie) Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (metro population: 13,261,538) has a family poverty rate of 12.0%.

47. (tie) Birmingham-Hoover, AL (metro population: 1,144,097) has a family poverty rate of 12.0%.

49. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL (metro population: 6,019,790) has a family poverty rate of 12.5%.

50. Tucson, AZ (metro population: 1,007,257) has a family poverty rate of 12.8%.

51. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA (metro population: 4,476,222) has a family poverty rate of 13.2%.

52. New Orleans-Metairie, LA (metro population: 1,260,660) has a family poverty rate of 13.5%.

53. Memphis, TN-MS-AR (metro population: 1,344,058) has a family poverty rate of 14.5%.

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/..._news_headline
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:24 PM
 
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Luminate NY competition to get another $15 million in state funding | Innovation Trail
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
With new coding degree, Villa Maria to prepare software developers for the workforce

Villa Maria College is offering two degrees aimed at supplying technology workers to surging and highly paid professions.

The private Catholic college in Cheektowaga plans this coming fall to debut a bachelor's degree of fine arts in video game design and a bachelor's of science in computer software development.

The programs will play off Villa Maria's success with animation and graphic design programs, which are the subject of heavy student interest and produce successful graduates, said Brian Emerson, the college's vice president for enrollment management.

The software development track will seek to turn out young developers with ability in many different coding languages and extensive real-world experience, Emerson said. It is designed to be a practical program rather than a highly theoretical one.

The average annual wage for entry-level software developers in Western New York is $58,100, while the average for experienced developers is $103,180, according to New York state labor statistics. Click here for more about software development jobs.

The college was motivated to build a game design degree after seeing the success of its animation program, one of Villa Maria's most popular tracks.

"As we dug into developing new programs we found the gaming industry is just huge, bigger than the music and film industry combined," Emerson said. "This is a perfect fit for us to help train people who can design games and bring characters to life."

The New York State Department of Labor does not track video game design wages locally, though PayScale estimates the average annual salary at $61,937. The program was designed by Jeffery Werner, a veteran animation professor.

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/..._news_headline
Can view information in terms of the bolded sentence here as well: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oessrcma.htm#N (scroll to New York)
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Old 02-07-2019, 05:24 PM
 
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Which Upstate New York county has the strongest economy? (Hint: It's not in the Buffalo area.)

It's a long drive from the Niagara Frontier to the Upstate New York county that has the most vibrant economy.

Saratoga County, which is 285 miles east of Buffalo, achieved the highest score in a new Business First study of the economic vitality of all 48 Upstate counties. No Western New York county fared better than Allegany and Erie, which tied for 10th place.

The test had five parts. Each county's recent performance was compared against the national and state growth rates in five categories, based on the latest statistics from three federal agencies.

If a county equaled or did better than both the national growth rate and New York's statewide rate for the past three years, it received two points in a given category. If it tied or surpassed only the state rate, it was given a single point.

No Upstate county came close to a perfect score of 10 points, a clear indication of the generally troubled condition of the region's economy. But Saratoga County, which is due north of Albany, did manage to climb past the halfway point, earning a total of six points.

The sole runner-up was Livingston County, which is south of Rochester. It received five points. Seven counties tied with four points apiece.

Breakdowns for all 48 counties can be found below. Upstate New York is defined as the portion of the state that is north of the 42nd parallel. Western New York is a subset of Upstate, encompassing Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming counties.

The state's 14 southernmost counties, which constitute the Lower Hudson Valley, New York City and Long Island, are grouped as Downstate New York.

They were not included in the Business First analysis.

Below are the study's five categories. Each is listed with its national and state growth rates during the most recent three-year period, as well as the source of the data.

Population. National growth rate: 2.2 percent. State rate: 0.4 percent. Source: U.S. Census Bureau.
Gross domestic product (GDP), the total value of all goods and services produced in a given year. National growth rate: 6.8 percent. State rate: 3.6 percent. Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
Private-sector businesses. National growth rate: 6.3 percent. State rate: 4.2 percent. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Private-sector workers. National growth rate: 5.4 percent. State rate: 5.0 percent. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Average weekly wage for private-sector workers. National growth rate: 9.0 percent. State rate: 8.3 percent. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Saratoga County earned two points in three separate categories. Its population grew by 2.2 percent in three years, its GDP expanded by 7.8 percent, and its number of private-sector workers jumped by 8.1 percent. Saratoga fell short of both the national and state norms in the other two categories.

The population increase was perhaps the most impressive part of Saratoga County's resume. No other county across Upstate New York posted a three-year population gain greater than 0.5 percent, and 42 of the 48 counties (including every Western New York county but Erie) actually suffered a decline.

Western New York fared poorly in the overall economic-vitality standings. Allegany and Erie counties topped the national and state standards for wage growth, as well as the state rate for GDP, earning three points apiece. Orleans County picked up two points, and Niagara and Wyoming counties received one point apiece.

The remaining three counties in Western New York (Cattaraugus, Chautauqua and Genesee) were shut out.

What follows is an alphabetical list of Upstate's 48 counties. Each is accompanied by its number of points and its three-year growth rates in the five categories.

Albany County — Score: 3 points. Population: 0.5%. GDP: 5.9%. Businesses: 1.7%. Workers: 2.5%. Wages: 8.9%.

Allegany County — Score: 3 points. Population: -1.7%. GDP: 5.4%. Businesses: -2.8%. Workers: -8.1%. Wages: 11.2%.

Broome County — Score: 2 points. Population: -2.0%. GDP: -8.1%. Businesses: -0.3%. Workers: 0.2%. Wages: 10.9%.

Cattaraugus County — Score: 0 points. Population: -1.8%. GDP: 0.1%. Businesses: -1.5%. Workers: -3.1%. Wages: 3.8%.

Cayuga County — Score: 3 points. Population: -1.5%. GDP: 5.0%. Businesses: -2.0%. Workers: -2.4%. Wages: 9.4%.

Chautauqua County — Score: 0 points. Population: -2.2%. GDP: -1.4%. Businesses: -2.5%. Workers: -3.6%. Wages: 8.0%.

Chemung County — Score: 2 points. Population: -2.1%. GDP: 4.9%. Businesses: -3.8%. Workers: -4.6%. Wages: 8.7%.

Chenango County — Score: 4 points. Population: -3.0%. GDP: 7.5%. Businesses: -2.6%. Workers: -3.1%. Wages: 10.8%.

Clinton County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.7%. GDP: 0.9%. Businesses: 0.0%. Workers: 4.9%. Wages: 9.1%.

Columbia County — Score: 2 points. Population: -2.3%. GDP: 7.3%. Businesses: 2.9%. Workers: 4.1%. Wages: 2.4%.

Cortland County — Score: 2 points. Population: -2.0%. GDP: 10.0%. Businesses: -0.4%. Workers: -3.6%. Wages: 7.2%.

Delaware County — Score: 1 point. Population: -3.3%. GDP: 5.6%. Businesses: 0.1%. Workers: 2.4%. Wages: 7.8%.

Erie County — Score: 3 points. Population: 0.1%. GDP: 6.5%. Businesses: 1.8%. Workers: 1.4%. Wages: 10.2%.

Essex County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.1%. GDP: 0.2%. Businesses: 2.3%. Workers: 3.4%. Wages: 14.7%.

Franklin County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.1%. GDP: -6.4%. Businesses: -1.7%. Workers: 2.9%. Wages: 25.1%.

Fulton County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.2%. GDP: -1.4%. Businesses: 3.4%. Workers: -1.2%. Wages: 11.5%.

Genesee County — Score: 0 points. Population: -1.4%. GDP: -0.3%. Businesses: 2.3%. Workers: 2.9%. Wages: 6.4%.

Greene County — Score: 0 points. Population: -1.1%. GDP: -11.3%. Businesses: -0.7%. Workers: 2.5%. Wages: 3.4%.

Hamilton County — Score: 3 points. Population: -4.6%. GDP: 5.2%. Businesses: -3.0%. Workers: -8.4%. Wages: 13.6%.

Herkimer County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.8%. GDP: 1.8%. Businesses: -0.5%. Workers: 3.4%. Wages: 10.5%.

Jefferson County — Score: 0 points. Population: -4.1%. GDP: -7.2%. Businesses: 0.2%. Workers: -2.3%. Wages: 7.2%.

Lewis County — Score: 3 points. Population: -2.0%. GDP: 3.7%. Businesses: 0.2%. Workers: 3.3%. Wages: 12.3%.

Livingston County — Score: 5 points. Population: -1.3%. GDP: 5.2%. Businesses: 1.9%. Workers: 5.4%. Wages: 12.8%.

Madison County — Score: 3 points. Population: -1.8%. GDP: 3.7%. Businesses: 0.3%. Workers: 2.8%. Wages: 9.9%.

Monroe County — Score: 3 points. Population: -0.3%. GDP: 4.2%. Businesses: 3.2%. Workers: 2.2%. Wages: 9.6%.

Montgomery County — Score: 3 points. Population: -0.8%. GDP: 6.2%. Businesses: 2.3%. Workers: 7.3%. Wages: 4.6%.

Niagara County — Score: 1 point. Population: -1.0%. GDP: 4.8%. Businesses: 1.3%. Workers: 0.2%. Wages: 8.2%.

Oneida County — Score: 0 points. Population: -0.8%. GDP: -3.3%. Businesses: 0.3%. Workers: 2.9%. Wages: 7.0%.

Onondaga County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.7%. GDP: 6.8%. Businesses: -0.2%. Workers: 2.2%. Wages: 8.2%.

Ontario County — Score: 3 points. Population: 0.4%. GDP: 19.6%. Businesses: 2.7%. Workers: 2.5%. Wages: 7.2%.

Orleans County — Score: 2 points. Population: -2.2%. GDP: 1.0%. Businesses: 2.3%. Workers: -8.7%. Wages: 11.0%.

Oswego County — Score: 4 points. Population: -1.8%. GDP: 9.2%. Businesses: 0.3%. Workers: 0.7%. Wages: 15.8%.

Otsego County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.5%. GDP: -0.2%. Businesses: -1.2%. Workers: -0.2%. Wages: 14.4%.

Rensselaer County — Score: 3 points. Population: -0.1%. GDP: 5.7%. Businesses: 1.7%. Workers: 7.0%. Wages: 2.2%.

St. Lawrence County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.8%. GDP: 0.8%. Businesses: -1.9%. Workers: 1.9%. Wages: 14.0%.

Saratoga County — Score: 6 points. Population: 2.2%. GDP: 7.8%. Businesses: 4.0%. Workers: 8.1%. Wages: 7.4%.

Schenectady County — Score: 0 points. Population: 0.1%. GDP: 3.4%. Businesses: 0.9%. Workers: 0.3%. Wages: 4.9%.

Schoharie County — Score: 4 points. Population: -1.2%. GDP: -2.9%. Businesses: 0.0%. Workers: 8.5%. Wages: 14.0%.

Schuyler County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.9%. GDP: -7.5%. Businesses: -0.5%. Workers: 4.4%. Wages: 16.0%.

Seneca County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.1%. GDP: -1.6%. Businesses: -0.3%. Workers: 12.7%. Wages: 8.1%.

Steuben County — Score: 4 points. Population: -2.0%. GDP: 24.0%. Businesses: 0.1%. Workers: 2.1%. Wages: 16.6%.

Tioga County — Score: 4 points. Population: -2.5%. GDP: 22.1%. Businesses: -1.3%. Workers: 6.1%. Wages: 6.4%.

Tompkins County — Score: 4 points. Population: 0.5%. GDP: 4.3%. Businesses: 1.7%. Workers: -0.2%. Wages: 10.5%.

Warren County — Score: 4 points. Population: -0.6%. GDP: 8.9%. Businesses: -0.8%. Workers: -0.2%. Wages: 10.1%.

Washington County — Score: 0 points. Population: -1.4%. GDP: -2.8%. Businesses: -0.2%. Workers: -2.2%. Wages: 1.2%.

Wayne County — Score: 2 points. Population: -1.3%. GDP: -2.1%. Businesses: 1.4%. Workers: -4.1%. Wages: 9.7%.

Wyoming County — Score: 1 point. Population: -1.6%. GDP: 5.2%. Businesses: -2.1%. Workers: -1.7%. Wages: 7.2%.

Yates County — Score: 2 points. Population: -0.8%. GDP: 3.5%. Businesses: 2.9%. Workers: 2.0%. Wages: 9.6%.

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/..._news_headline
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:43 PM
 
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IBM plans $2 billion expansion in New York for artificial intelligence

ALBANY – IBM will invest $2 billion in New York to develop artificial intelligence hardware and bolster research opportunities in the field with the state's publicly funded university system, the company announced Thursday.

The technology company will be partnering with the State University of New York to develop an AI Hardware Center at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Albany.

And it comes with a hefty state subsidy of $300 million.

The new center, which is expected to generate hundreds of new jobs in the state's Capital region, will be supported by IBM's research center in Yorktown Heights, according to a spokesperson for the company.

"AI will transform the world in dramatic ways in the coming years. IBM is pushing the boundaries of AI faster - for the benefit of industry and society," Mukesh Khare, vice president for semiconductor and AI hardware at IBM Research said in a statement.

"By expanding our partnership with New York state, we are creating a global hub of AI hardware research with an ecosystem to innovate, incubate, and lead in the development of disruptive technologies."

IBM will provide $30 million to develop artificial intelligence research programs across the SUNY system, a donation the university system will match with a $25 million investment of its own.

Empire State Development, the state's economic development branch, will provide a five-year, $300 million grant to SUNY's Research Foundation to purchase and install equipment to support the hardware center.

It's the latest subsidy for the Albany nanocenter that was marred by scandal because of the conviction of its former president, Alain Kaloyeros, on bid-rigging charges.

In November, the state shipped $250 million to the center as part of a $600 million, seven-year deal with Applied Materials, the California-based tech company.

And the latest deal with IBM follows one that ended several years after IBM, Intel and GlobalFoundries first signed onto a $4 billion research agreement at the Albany facility in 2011.

Latest project

IBM, which is based in Armonk, Westchester County, previously announced plans to open a quantum computing facility in Poughkeepsie this year.

"We continue to offer a world class education in innovative fields and artificial intelligence is just one example of how SUNY is investing in new tech clusters to prepare our students for the good paying jobs of tomorrow," Kristina Johnson, SUNY's chancellor, said in a statement.

IBM already partners with SUNY Poly at the school's Center for Semiconductor Research — a relationship it plans to extend through 2023 with a five-year renewal option, the company also said Thursday.

The extension is expected to retain hundreds of additional jobs in the state while the new research center is expected to attract companies across the emerging field and generate federal research opportunities.

"Artificial intelligence has the potential to transform how we live and how businesses operate, and this partnership with IBM will help ensure New York continues to be on the cutting edge developing innovative technologies," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement.

The announcement follows an eventful January for IBM, in which it reported $79.59 billion in revenue for 2018, marking the first time it posted positive annual revenue since 2011.

It also announced the Q System One, an integrated quantum computing system that the company says is optimized for commercial clients to access the burgeoning technology.

The company says it will be utilized at the first IBM Q Computation Center, opening in Poughkeepsie.

Poughkeepsie is also where IBM produces its Z Systems mainframes, which have been a part of the company's push into cloud computing and credited with helping the company's revenue growth.

However, IBM spokesperson Angela Sullivan said there will not be an "immediate impact in Poughkeepsie."

Source: https://www.ithacajournal.com/story/...ce/2801486002/
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:38 AM
 
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NY awards $2.5M for youth jobs programs in Syracuse, Albany: https://wnyt.com/money/ny-awards-25m...109/?cat=10114

Trend toward open office space poses challenges for workers | Innovation Trail
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:22 PM
 
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GM's Tonawanda plant will build engine for heavy-duty 2020 Silverado

The V-8 engine for the 2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD will be built at General Motors' Tonawanda Engine Plant, continuing that factory's success in securing work for the company's popular large vehicles.

Local GM factory and union officials made the announcement Friday at the Buffalo Auto Show at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center.

The 6.6-liter engine will also utilize parts built at GM factories in Lockport and Tonawanda. It will feature 401 horsepower and offer 22 percent more torque and 18 percent more towing capacity than the outgoing gas engine, according to a GM announcement.

"I expect to see a lot of these trucks in the winter in Western New York because that's what they're built for," plant manager Ram Ramanujam said.

The tooling for the engine was part of a $295.9 million investment for the factory that was announced in 2016. The new engine will be the first application of direct injection in a heavy-duty truck. Ramanujam said the volume of new Silverado engines built will be dependent upon customer demand.

The Tonawanda Engine plant currently makes 4.3-liter V-6 engines for the Silverado; 5.3- and 6.2-liter V-8s for the Silverado, Tahoe and Suburban; and Ecotec 2.5-liter and 2-liter Turbo for six other Chevrolet vehicles.

GM's announcement comes at a time of upheaval in for the broader company, which announced last year it would cut about 14,000 salaried and executive jobs in North America and offered buyouts to nearly 20,000 long-tenured employees. This year GM has announced it would lay off about 4,000 more white collar workers while idling five factories.

Neither Ramanujan nor a GM spokesman could quantify how those moves affected GM's local factories.

Chuck Herr, shop chairman of the UAW Local 774 union that covers the Tonawanda factory, said the local GM workforce is concentrating on producing high-quality work that keeps the factory viable going forward. He said he actively collaborates with Ramanujam about current and future trends to make sure Tonawanda Engine remains competitive.

"We only try and think about what we can control," Herr said. "We want to build the best engines we can to continue our reputation and get more work in the future."

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/..._news_headline
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Old 02-09-2019, 10:26 AM
 
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Advocates want protections for farmworkers | Innovation Trail

SYRACUSE REGIONAL AIRPORT AUTHORITY HIRES CONSULTING FIRM TO HELP IN SEARCH FOR NEW AIRPORT DIRECTOR: https://www.cnybj.com/syracuse-regio...port-director/
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Old 02-09-2019, 10:39 AM
 
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Good news for Batavia/Genesee County...

GCEDC accepting applications for $130,000 in incentives for Graham Manufacturing, $206,000 for Gateway GS projects: https://www.thedailynewsonline.com/b...jects-20190208
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