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Old 02-03-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
Have any of you driven a car with a CVT for any length of time (not just a test drive)?

Yes. I much prefer it to a traditional automatic. It just takes a couple weeks to get used to.
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post
Yes. I much prefer it to a traditional automatic. It just takes a couple weeks to get used to.
Same here. It's much smoother than a regular automatic.

I just don't get anyone knocking something they have no practical experience with.
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post
Toyota / Lexus use them in the hybrid models.

Subaru uses them.

Audi uses them.

I believe Honda uses them in their hybrids.

Ford uses them, Mercedes uses them.

You are correct in that Nissan is the only automaker to use them across the line up, but a lot of major automakers use them selectively, and they are seeing more and more use.
I did specify that they are used on hybrids (Toyota, Honda and Ford) as a hybrid requires a CVT to work, unless it is a "soft" hybrid like the GM system.

Audi uses them only on the base FWD models and you can ask on any Audi board what their opinion of the CVT is.

Ford no longer uses a CVT in any non-hybrid application. They tried them in a couple vehicles such as the Five Hundred and Freestyle, but scrapped them after having repeat issues and went with traditional autos.

GM used them in a few product lines, but also scrapped them after major issues.

Chrysler uses them, but they are Nissan sourced units and there have been plenty of issues with them.

Mercedes uses them in their base entry-level vehicles in Europe, none are used in the U.S.

Subaru has toyed with CVT's since the 80's. The current ones seem to be good, but we'll see how long it lasts. Even then outside of the base engine, they don't use CVT's.

They are appearing more as they do offer a MPG bump and with the new CAFE standards looming some manufacturers are using them to squeeze out every last MPG possible. This is often cited as the reason Nissan and Subaru are going with them, not because they are necessarily "better".
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:52 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,537,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
Have any of you driven a car with a CVT for any length of time (not just a test drive)?
Yes. I have nothing wrong with how a CVT behaves, though it does take getting used to. The problem with a CVT is that they are inherently fragile (much lower torque ratings than a regular automatic) and ridiculously expensive to replace.
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Old 02-03-2011, 03:04 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,537,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
In my case, not techno-phobe, just that the CVT is an answer to a question I didn't ask. I prefer a stickshift, failing that, a conventional automatic is OK in some vehicles. The CVT can offer an economy benefit, as I understand it, mostly for people who do a lot of city/urban cycle type driving. Which I don't.

That said, maybe since Nissan has had problems with CVT in the past, they put their "A" team on it, and have it sorted now. Time will tell.

Anybody know what Nissan has done to improve their CVT since having problems? Do you know what they did, Goat?
I don't really know specifics on what they changed. I do know that the CVT's that are covered under the warranty on 2003-2010 MY vehicles are all the same essential belt driven CVT design built in coordination with JATCO, though there were numerous running software changes along the way.

In 2009, JATCO and Nissan announced a thorough redesign of that unit. The new one appeared in 2011 and doesn't carry the extended warranty, but is lighter and more compact, though still belt driven. Obviously, whatever issues they think they had, got ironed out in the redesign.

The one thing that still irks me on them though is how willing they are to drop the warranty if you fail to follow their protocol. Basically you have two choices:

1. Follow one of the normal maintenance schedules which doesn't specify a fluid change on the CVT, but REQUIRES the fluid to be tested at each oil change (for a diag charge of course) and it can ONLY be tested at the dealer.

2. Follow their completely unnecessary "premium" schedule for oil changes and maintenance to the letter and have the CVT fluid changed every 30k. Again, that fluid change HAS to be done at the dealer.

Failing any of those and the transmission fails, they can void the warranty. There are some folks on here with Nissans with CVT's, have any of you had your oil changed anywhere besides the dealer? If so and you didn't get the CVT fluid checked or follow the "premium" schedule, Nissan can void your warranty on the trans.
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,420 posts, read 42,778,501 times
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Goat, the original Honda Insight (Hybrid) is a stickshift.

I'm just not a new car guy, and as time goes on I like the new offerings less and less. To me any transmission that *requires* dealer service - OK you have lost the deal with me right there.

My idea of a "proper" automatic is a TH 400, or a C6. Or maybe an Allison.

I think till experience proves otherwise, it would be better to say "whatever issues they think they have, they *think* they have ironed out in the new design". If a part has been breaking, and the "new, improved" part is actually smaller and lighter, unless it's using high-strength materials like carbon fiber, titanium etc, permit an old-school engineer to have some doubts that the issue has been put to bed.
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Old 02-04-2011, 07:08 AM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,537,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Goat, the original Honda Insight (Hybrid) is a stickshift.

I'm just not a new car guy, and as time goes on I like the new offerings less and less. To me any transmission that *requires* dealer service - OK you have lost the deal with me right there.

My idea of a "proper" automatic is a TH 400, or a C6. Or maybe an Allison.

I think till experience proves otherwise, it would be better to say "whatever issues they think they have, they *think* they have ironed out in the new design". If a part has been breaking, and the "new, improved" part is actually smaller and lighter, unless it's using high-strength materials like carbon fiber, titanium etc, permit an old-school engineer to have some doubts that the issue has been put to bed.
I didn't mean to imply that I thought everything with their CVT was A-OK post re-design, I still wouldn't personally buy one or recommend one. You are correct that your statement is a much better way to put it.
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Old 02-07-2011, 09:59 PM
 
1,168 posts, read 4,297,225 times
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I am going to bring this thread back to life. In the market for one of these crossovers to replace the Mopar vanagon. Have been a manual transmission guy all my life, only gave in to automatic because of marriage and CA traffic
Test drove a Rogue today I was expecting to go through hell with the CVT, and actually was pretty satisfied. To me it felt more natural as an automatic, I mean if you are not shifting then let the thing do its job and speed away. If you want to shift then get a manual. I am still on the fence about long term reliability, but if I get a good discount on a used Rogue, I might pass on the CRV.
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Old 02-08-2011, 10:20 AM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,537,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00molavi View Post
I am going to bring this thread back to life. In the market for one of these crossovers to replace the Mopar vanagon. Have been a manual transmission guy all my life, only gave in to automatic because of marriage and CA traffic
Test drove a Rogue today I was expecting to go through hell with the CVT, and actually was pretty satisfied. To me it felt more natural as an automatic, I mean if you are not shifting then let the thing do its job and speed away. If you want to shift then get a manual. I am still on the fence about long term reliability, but if I get a good discount on a used Rogue, I might pass on the CRV.
Looking at something like a Rogue with a CVT these days, you have two options:

1. Buy a 2011 with the redesigned unit and hope the flaws are fixed as you only have the regular 5yr/60k powertrain warranty for the transmission.

2. Buy a 2010 or older and you will have the old more failure prone unit, but you will be covered to 10yr/120k on the transmission (everything else still falls under the standard powertrain warranty).

In either scenario, I would recommend following Nissans maintenance schedule to the letter and don't let anyone but the dealer service the transmission.

I personally think a 2010 or even a 2009 with low miles is the way to go as those years had the most refined version of the old trans design, but still had the really nice extended warranty coverage. To me, a 2011 is just rolling the dice, hoping the issues have been fixed.
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Old 02-19-2011, 10:52 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
You could make that statement about any part on any car ever made.

To the OP, wife's '07 Altima is closing in on 100k without even the hint of any problem. Very smooth and is always in the right ratio which helps fuel mileage. As far as driving in snow, it's no different than any other fwd car.

Genuine Nissan CVT fluid runs about $20qt and it holds around 6qts. If you have the ability to change your oil then you can do a drain and refill on the trans. A flush costs considerably more.

I'd pick the Nissan over the Ford.
Couldn't have said that better my self. Cheers
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