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Old 03-25-2015, 12:02 PM
 
1,780 posts, read 2,168,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Tooth issues are largely preventable with daily brushing and flossing. When I was younger I neglected my oral hygiene and later paid thousands for restorative work.
This just isn't the case. Some folks have better teeth than others. My mother had a daily dental routine that was very involved, but she still ended up with nine root canals and lots and lots of trips to the dentist. Ditto with my father.

Genetics is an element as well.

My ex-husband's parents spent a fortune on his teeth (to age 21), and throughout his life, he got regular cleanings and dental care. At age 40, he said "Screw it," and just decided to take good care of his teeth at home, but stop with the twice yearly visits to the dentist.

He was (and is) healthy as a horse, but at age 55, he had eight bad teeth pulled and went with full dentures.

It's not just about "daily brushing and flossing."
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Old 03-25-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Princeton, New Jersey
513 posts, read 869,440 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagemomma View Post
I can't tell you how many professional adults I have met recently with really bad teeth. I don't mean to sound petty or judgemental, I'm just wondering what would prevent an educated employed person from taking care of their teeth.

I've met people with blackness around their gumline where they have crowns. People missing front teeth, people with discolored teeth. I had a blind date recently with a very nice gentleman who is clearly self conscious about his teeth. He was avoiding smiling or would duck his head to the side when he smiled. He KNOWS.

So why not just have them fixed?

And yes, it makes me wonder if maybe I should get my eyes fixed because don't people meet me and wonder "surely she knows those droopy eyes make her look bad."
Terror. Unadulterated terror.
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Old 03-25-2015, 02:19 PM
 
15,737 posts, read 9,259,225 times
Reputation: 14227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagemomma View Post
As a single woman, I consider the condition of the mouth I'm going to kiss. If that is shallow, I can own that. Some women don't like bald heads, or short men. I really don't care about stuff like that (things out of our control). My parents have brown coffee stained teeth and my whole life I've been trying to avoid Mom's nasty coffee breath. So I'm sure part of my aversion is due to that.

As a person who is underemployed...people spend all kinds of money they don't have on things like cars or iGadgets or data plans or vacations. But there is no disputing the relationship between good teeth and success. And a lot of what I'm talking about is not just cosmetic. I had a very dark tooth...went to see about getting it bleached...Dentist found a dead root and my insurance paid for the root canal. I paid a small additional fee for interior whitening. Minimal out of pocket expense, worth every penny. Lots of work that is covered will improve the appearance of your teeth. My teeth are far from perfect, I will never be a toothpaste model, but at least they are now all roughly the same color.

As a person with teeth, I know very well that dental health, such as the condition of crowns or caps or fillings or gums, is very closely linked to overall physical health. If you leave spaces between your teeth , that can cause malformation of the mouth and jaw that will cause serious problems later. It is NOT just a cosmetic thing.

I feel bad, because the guy I went out with last night was nice. But to me it was about more than the teeth. His self esteem has been impacted by his teeth, yet he doesn't make getting them fixed a priority. So what does that say about his datability?
My husband has really crooked teeth. They're in great shape, but his mouth his crowded. He grew up before everyone and their grandmother got braces, and they were horribly expensive. Now, as an adult, they are just as expensive, and they don't bother him, so it's no big deal.

Your date's teeth says nothing about his datability, but it speaks volumes about you. Yes, you are petty and judgmental.
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Old 03-25-2015, 02:20 PM
 
15,737 posts, read 9,259,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonBeam33 View Post
As the link between dental health and overall health becomes more understood, hopefully most insurances will cover more dental care. As for the rest of us who don't have dental insurance or can't afford the out of pocket expense that would go with it - what would you suggest they do? You are talking about potentially thousands of dollars for people with low income, erratic income, fixed income. My oldest daughter needed braces (and she genuinely needed them, not just for cosmetic bs), but there was no way I could have afforded them, so her father and grandparents picked up the cost. Otherwise it wouldn't have happened.
Yea, it would have been nice for ObamaCare to have dealt with that issue. I'm 52 years old, and it's mandated that I have prenatal care insurance, but dental care is still very expensive.
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Old 03-26-2015, 07:36 AM
 
508 posts, read 670,144 times
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In my case, it is the money. Additionally, I feel if someone can still accept me and like me with my problematic teeth then they are worthy of my company. Granted, compared to your run of the mill Englishman my teeth are A+. : )
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Old 03-26-2015, 09:27 AM
 
780 posts, read 506,367 times
Reputation: 885
I need to put a cap on one of my one tooth. I had my root canal done and I have, HAVE to get it capped, but I can't afford it. Last time I was quoted, it was $1,300 and it's not covered by our dental plan, because it's considered "cosmetic surgery". It's such a simple thing and it cost that much. I can't even imagine how a whole mouth of fixing will cost.

I'm sure those people you are referring to knows exactly how bad their teeth are, but have to suck it all in despite being judged because their priority is paying mandatory bills, not pleasing others who can't see pass it.
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Old 03-26-2015, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,260 posts, read 11,127,425 times
Reputation: 12580
You are petty and judgemental, to use your own words.
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Old 03-26-2015, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
2,782 posts, read 2,443,341 times
Reputation: 4982
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Tooth issues are largely preventable with daily brushing and flossing. When I was younger I neglected my oral hygiene and later paid thousands for restorative work.
Sorry, receding gums are genetic. I take good care of my teeth and guess what? I have receding gums. It hurts like hell.

O.P my budget doesn't allow me to fix my teeth. My teen and young adult child come first.
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Old 03-26-2015, 08:06 PM
 
929 posts, read 1,488,823 times
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I'm with the OP, and I've wondered the same frequently. Teeth are IMPORTANT. I can understand somebody in grinding poverty not focusing on teeth, but I have always wondered about everybody else. Once when I was making about $35,000 a year, I was told I could have some dental work done to preserve my teeth for $1,200, or get them pulled for $200. I opened up a "Care Credit" with the dentist, got a part-time job and just bit the bullet. I refuse to go around with a gap in my mouth. People often find money for EVERTHING ELSE, seems like they could find some money for teeth.

Either rate, I ALSO agree with the OP - I'm not kissing or dating a man with bad teeth.
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:16 PM
 
1,060 posts, read 664,078 times
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I've been very fortunate to have dental insurance with all of my jobs since graduating college. And as far as I can recall I've been pretty religious with going at least once a year for a cleaning. But even with my insurance, the one time I had to get a filing removed and a crown put on, it set me back quite a bit. Not too mention that I am extremely sensitive to dental pain so I have bad anxiety if I know he's going to be using the drill. Ugh.

So I can understand from a financial perspective as well as an anxiety point of view why people avoid the dentist. But I also understand the strong link between overall health and dental/jaw health which is why I remain religious with my yearly cleanings to make sure everything is ok.
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