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Old 09-14-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,433,099 times
Reputation: 861

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Hi all, this topic that has been on my mind for a while but I haven't been able to summarize my feelings effectively. I'm hoping I could gain some insight from some of you on what you think of this pervasive topic of young people stereotypes and what advice you could give someone who feels averted to the norm.

I don't want to come off as being on a pedestal here. I am not really a judgmental person, but I do admit I sometimes analyze my environment with too much scrunity which may lead to some over assumptions. Anyway, the topic I would like to address is how frustrating it can be for a young person like myself who is not too keen on the trend mentality. It seems like any event/gathering I go to, no matter how trite, seems to be ripe with superficiality. People love to express how holy they are because of what cause they're behind, what important things they have been doing with their friends, what advancements/promotions they've gotten, etc. There just seems to be a lot of horn tooting and these people tend to overpower people like myself and cause me to feel put off in social situations. Whenever I visit "vibrant" neighborhoods in metro areas, they are for the most part homogenous in the sense that you can barely tell the stylistic differences between two people on the street. Yes, the "hipster," and "yuppie," labels are generic but sadly they have a lot of validity to them. I personally could barely tell one person from another when visiting Williamsburg, and the same goes for the yuppie enclaves, except it is a more corporate and upscale vibe.

9 times out out of ten when I go to concerts or other nightspots, I see the dominant trend mentality. Rather than simply enjoying their evening, people try to brand themselves as different/avante garde/eccentric or ostentatious/professional/etc. The smartphones are out constantly to capture the moment so it can be prompty shared to whoever is "important" via social media. I suppose people receive instant gratification as a result of externalizing their lives and getting approval, although I certainly don't get the point of that exercise.

I went to visit my friend from a working class family in upstate New York and we had a discussion about this topic I'm writing about. I joked with him that I "didn't want to screw around with that yuppie nonsense," and therefore we spent the day enjoying Arthur ave in the Bronx. I must say, visiting that neighborhood was like breathing a breath of fresh air. The real diversity, hole in the wall restaurants with real character, and the presence of good hard working New Yorkers instead of the prententious nonsense made for a very pleasant afternoon. I will definitely be going back.

From my observation, the yuppie/hipster schpeel doesn't tend to continue into the 30s and 40s so I dismiss it as young people trying to find their place. Eventually, I suppose they stop taking themselves so seriously, figuring that we all are going to be food for worms in the long run so why not lighten up a little. I don't know, but it sure can be frustrating at times. Thoughts/comments/opinions?

 
Old 09-15-2013, 12:17 AM
 
16,797 posts, read 14,533,786 times
Reputation: 37896
You and your peer group will grow out of it. Trust me. There are worse problems to have and they are coming.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 01:01 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,366,460 times
Reputation: 10386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcsligar View Post
Hi all, this topic that has been on my mind for a while but I haven't been able to summarize my feelings effectively. I'm hoping I could gain some insight from some of you on what you think of this pervasive topic of young people stereotypes and what advice you could give someone who feels averted to the norm.

I don't want to come off as being on a pedestal here. I am not really a judgmental person, but I do admit I sometimes analyze my environment with too much scrunity which may lead to some over assumptions. Anyway, the topic I would like to address is how frustrating it can be for a young person like myself who is not too keen on the trend mentality. It seems like any event/gathering I go to, no matter how trite, seems to be ripe with superficiality. People love to express how holy they are because of what cause they're behind, what important things they have been doing with their friends, what advancements/promotions they've gotten, etc. There just seems to be a lot of horn tooting and these people tend to overpower people like myself and cause me to feel put off in social situations. Whenever I visit "vibrant" neighborhoods in metro areas, they are for the most part homogenous in the sense that you can barely tell the stylistic differences between two people on the street. Yes, the "hipster," and "yuppie," labels are generic but sadly they have a lot of validity to them. I personally could barely tell one person from another when visiting Williamsburg, and the same goes for the yuppie enclaves, except it is a more corporate and upscale vibe.

9 times out out of ten when I go to concerts or other nightspots, I see the dominant trend mentality. Rather than simply enjoying their evening, people try to brand themselves as different/avante garde/eccentric or ostentatious/professional/etc. The smartphones are out constantly to capture the moment so it can be prompty shared to whoever is "important" via social media. I suppose people receive instant gratification as a result of externalizing their lives and getting approval, although I certainly don't get the point of that exercise.

I went to visit my friend from a working class family in upstate New York and we had a discussion about this topic I'm writing about. I joked with him that I "didn't want to screw around with that yuppie nonsense," and therefore we spent the day enjoying Arthur ave in the Bronx. I must say, visiting that neighborhood was like breathing a breath of fresh air. The real diversity, hole in the wall restaurants with real character, and the presence of good hard working New Yorkers instead of the prententious nonsense made for a very pleasant afternoon. I will definitely be going back.

From my observation, the yuppie/hipster schpeel doesn't tend to continue into the 30s and 40s so I dismiss it as young people trying to find their place. Eventually, I suppose they stop taking themselves so seriously, figuring that we all are going to be food for worms in the long run so why not lighten up a little. I don't know, but it sure can be frustrating at times. Thoughts/comments/opinions?
First of all, you are too intelligent to live. Make many more thoughtful posts like that, and the PC police together with a gang of Internet trolls will be along soon to haul you off somewhere.

If you don't mind a reply from a member of the dinosaur set, I'll give you a few of my thoughts. For one thing, the difference in class creates a major chasm between working class people and mid middle to upper middle class people. This drivel about the US being a "classless society is BS. I know because the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" pushed me through the looking glass from middle class professional to working (if you can find it) poor. It's like being an anthropologist in an entirely different culture, and the gulf is widening, not diminishing.

I know zero about the towns in New York and be it Manhatten or the Bronx, it's all NYC to me. But the exact same differences you describe can be found here in Colorado. The wealthy yuppies in Boulder may celebrate diversity, but "diversity" could never in the world afford the high cost of living in that yuppie town. (Maybe poor Boulder is now being punished for its sins by the floods) Believe it or not, once upon a time Boulder was just a cow town that happened to have a small state university near-by. My, how times have changed. Boulder is now so PC that I cringe at the very thought of going anywhere near it. The people there are often shallow and quick to stereotype. They all dress in the same hip style and flaunt their expensive accessories - ESPECIALLY the latest and greatest smart phones and tablets which they text away endlessly on while life passes them by on the Pearl Street Mall.

My favorite yuppie atrocity story is about smoke jumper boots:

I was married for 20 years to a man who worked for the Forest Service as a seasonal employee and during the summer risked his life fighting wildfire, so the rest of us could still enjoy the National Forests which are true treasures set aside especially for the American people. If you're lucky, you might get 7 months of work and some fire pay before being laid off for the season, so we had to stretch our income to cover the jobless winter months here in rural Colorado. If you're doing that kind of work out in the forest, cruising timber and fighting fire, you really need a type of boot made by the White's company, and they're often called smoke jumper's boots because they're also the type boots preferred by smoke jumpers who risk their lives fighting fire by being dropped on the flare-ups by air. Those White's boots don't come cheap and the FS doesn't issue them. You save for 3 or 4 or 5 paychecks to be able to afford a pair. And you don't save up all that money to buy them if you're working class and just want to look like one of the "in crowd." You buy them because you're working class and you need them to do work - especially the work of fire fighting because they are especially designed for walk through the flames.

Several years back, Colorado had a horrific forest fire that threatened the homes of a bunch of idiot yuppies who had decided to build their McMansions on the urban/forest edge of the town of Glenwood Springs. Under any other conditions, that fire would have never been fought so agressively, but the yuppies who had decided to build right next door to a national forest were screaming bloody murder. This outcry caused fire bosses to make hasty decisions to their and everyone else's regret. Fourteen forest service fire fighters (all wearing their White's "smoke jumper" boots) died in a fire storm from hell on a ridge just outside of the town of Glenwood. Fourteen brave men and women who would never return to their families because some yuppies unwisely built their homes in the urban/forest corridor against all official advise. But that's not the end of the story.

As a result of such incidents, Glenwood especially, being a forest service fire fighter developed a certain cache' here in Colorado and elsewhere. The yuppie set couldn't wait to acquire a pair of smoke jumper boots to look ever so chic when most of them wouldn't have known what a tree was, even if one fell on them. At the height of this atrocity of a fashion craze, I happened to see a pair of smoke jumper style boots on display in the window of a boutique in the ever so chic, yuppie resort town of Telluride. The boots were made up of turquoise dyed alligator skin and cost a cool $2,500.00.

I leaned against the building in my jean jacket and old sneakers and thought about those fourteen fallen fire fighters and hard winter months while the yuppie crowd walked past, giving me looks of suspicion, then dismissing me as a no-account local peasant, no doubt come to town for a job scrubbing the floors in one of their mountain chalets on the edge of the forest. Places where Forest Service fire fighters in their humble but REAL White's boots might risk their lives protecting in a fire next summer.

Lack of authenticity is not confined to the under 30 folk. The type you posted about seldom grows out of it. They'll be wearing smoke jumper boots at 80. The syndrome is not confined to New York, either. It's everywhere.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Atlanta (Finally on 4-1-17)
1,850 posts, read 2,456,791 times
Reputation: 2575
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentropa View Post
You and your peer group will grow out of it. Trust me. There are worse problems to have and they are coming.

You better believe it.


But I will say, some do not grow out of it.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 06:24 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 7,184,014 times
Reputation: 4297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Several years back, Colorado had a horrific forest fire that threatened the homes of a bunch of idiot yuppies who had decided to build their McMansions on the urban/forest edge of the town of Glenwood Springs. Under any other conditions, that fire would have never been fought so agressively, but the yuppies who had decided to build right next door to a national forest were screaming bloody murder. This outcry caused fire bosses to make hasty decisions to their and everyone else's regret. Fourteen forest service fire fighters (all wearing their White's "smoke jumper" boots) died in a fire storm from hell on a ridge just outside of the town of Glenwood. .....

As a result of such incidents, Glenwood especially, being a forest service fire fighter developed a certain cache' here in Colorado and elsewhere. The yuppie set couldn't wait to acquire a pair of smoke jumper boots to look ever so chic
Storm King Mountain? According to the report written up later, that disaster was caused by a concatenation of events that has yet to ever be duplicated.

Login - Fire Engineering

It would have certainly been proven later that the best decision should have been "let the effing homes burn until the fire reaches a manageable state." What a loss of lives

I bet if you polled the regular people wearing those boots (which I looked up and pronounced "useful, sturdy, but - daaaammn - those are ugly") they'd likely say they wear them to honor the fire fighters. And maybe some do. I'd then ask those people if they contributed to any funds that went to help the families of the fallen; after all, they can afford the boots ....... .... and watch them squirm

The satisfaction one gets from being annoyed by current trends is that the offspring of the trendoids will likely cause their parents to be horrified. I deal with my hipster nieces and nephews by shaking my head. Several years ago, I asked my sister why she didn't say something about her grandson's hair; it was lank and brushed in a purposeful wave that made it cover his eyes. Sister sighed and said "he's being Emo." Me: "well, that looks stupeedo."

Down the road, the offspring of the current trendy-types might well end up looking like a city character from 'Hunger Games.' When you hear the older folks moan over the outlandish look of the youngsters, you can raise your eyebrows and nod with satisfaction.

Last edited by silverwing; 09-15-2013 at 06:41 AM..
 
Old 09-15-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,433,099 times
Reputation: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentropa View Post
You and your peer group will grow out of it. Trust me. There are worse problems to have and they are coming.
I am well aware of that and don't mean to sound over dramatic, I just like to share my opinion every so often. I am not in a dire situation, to say the least.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 08:13 AM
 
1,035 posts, read 1,653,622 times
Reputation: 2156
I get where you're coming from OP though I don't know if I'd say people grow out of it. I feel that with each age range, the dominant superficiality simply takes on a different form. So for those like myself who feel a bit like everything going on around them is irritatingly devoid of substance or distinction, I don't think that feeling ever really goes away because it never stops being true for you.

I do agree, though, that when you get older, you end up with other things to occupy your mind not to mention (usually) more freedom and independence to be able to venture out into the world and find environments and social circles that speak to you and the rest starts to fade away.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,366,460 times
Reputation: 10386
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverwing View Post
Storm King Mountain? According to the report written up later, that disaster was caused by a concatenation of events that has yet to ever be duplicated.

Login - Fire Engineering

It would have certainly been proven later that the best decision should have been "let the effing homes burn until the fire reaches a manageable state." What a loss of lives

I bet if you polled the regular people wearing those boots (which I looked up and pronounced "useful, sturdy, but - daaaammn - those are ugly") they'd likely say they wear them to honor the fire fighters. And maybe some do. I'd then ask those people if they contributed to any funds that went to help the families of the fallen; after all, they can afford the boots ....... .... and watch them squirm

The satisfaction one gets from being annoyed by current trends is that the offspring of the trendoids will likely cause their parents to be horrified. I deal with my hipster nieces and nephews by shaking my head. Several years ago, I asked my sister why she didn't say something about her grandson's hair; it was lank and brushed in a purposeful wave that made it cover his eyes. Sister sighed and said "he's being Emo." Me: "well, that looks stupeedo."

Down the road, the offspring of the current trendy-types might well end up looking like a city character from 'Hunger Games.' When you hear the older folks moan over the outlandish look of the youngsters, you can raise your eyebrows and nod with satisfaction.
You with the Forest Service? Hot Shot Crew, maybe? Incident command? Ever been out on one of those big California wild fires in September? Or maybe you mostly work as a GS3 "Timber Beast," and you're spiked out somewhere here in Western Colorado - maybe the San Juan Mountain Range - and your watching slopes with nothing but blackened trees to hold the soil back from slumping off down the mountainside and into the flood swollen waters of the San Miguel River. If so, I'd be delighted to discuss this further in a thread on the Colorado forum where me and you and other experienced back country folk can have an interesting chat about what REALLY came down on Storm King and not clutter up the OP's thread here with arcane fire fighting trivia.

But yeah, some of those wanna-be yuppies should be spanked. I've never asked one why they would want to wear $2,500 imitation smoke jumper boots since it seems more obscene than respectful to me - kind of like wearing $5,000.00 silk designer desert camo style fatigues to show that you "support our troops." How much do they really admire Forest Service fire fighters anyhow, when they spit on the real ones in Telluride? Pfffft! Try showing up at a bar at ever so chic Telluride after you've been spiked out for a week and you just want to stop in for one Coors before making that long drive home down 145 to Dolores or Cortez. Good luck with that one.

Last edited by Colorado Rambler; 09-15-2013 at 08:44 AM..
 
Old 09-15-2013, 08:37 AM
 
350 posts, read 600,228 times
Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcsligar View Post
I am not really a judgmental person,
any event/gathering I go to, no matter how trite, seems to be ripe with superficiality.
I am not really a judgmental person,
People love to express how holy they are
I am not really a judgmental person,
There just seems to be a lot of horn tooting
I am not really a judgmental person,
people tend to overpower people like myself
I am not really a judgmental person,
cause me to feel put off in social situations.
I am not really a judgmental person,
you can barely tell the stylistic differences between two people on the street.
I am not really a judgmental person,
I personally could barely tell one person from another
I am not really a judgmental person,
I see the dominant trend mentality.
I am not really a judgmental person,
people try to brand themselves as different/avante garde/eccentric
I am not really a judgmental person,
ostentatious/professional/etc.
I am not really a judgmental person,
people receive instant gratification as a result of externalizing their lives and getting approval,
I am not really a judgmental person,
I "didn't want to screw around with that yuppie nonsense,"
I am not really a judgmental person,
the presence of good hard working New Yorkers
I am not really a judgmental person,
the prententious nonsense
I am not really a judgmental person,
the yuppie/hipster schpeel doesn't tend to continue into the 30s and 40s
I am not really a judgmental person,
they stop taking themselves so seriously,
We're all about the same.
 
Old 09-15-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,433,099 times
Reputation: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by brainwashed_in_church View Post
We're all about the same.
I just call things like I see it.
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