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Old 12-31-2013, 07:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulAS1 View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't know that, never been to a hospital.
They ask you this even if you go to see a doctor outside of a hospital.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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I don't know where you live, but some states have registries. If yours does you should have it on file there.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
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Yes tell your next of kin that you have a living will and medical directive. In most living wills you name a family member, or other individual, as your medical proxy to make decisions if you are not able. Tell that person that you have the living will, what it says (i.e. "DNR, or no respirator, or whatever) and ask them to respect your wishes. You can also place a copy of it in a container in your fridge and there is a sticker to place on the fridge door to tell emergency personnel that your medical directive is inside the fridge. Emergency responders are taught to check the fridge door for this info. I would also get a medic alert bracelet if it's something as short as "do not resuscitate".

edited to add: I think you meant "executor", not "executioner". Funny Freudian slip though!
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulAS1 View Post
My will mentions that situation as well. If I have a stroke but don't die, I leave enough money to be looked after but don't want any treatment after the event itself.
You know your will is not effective while you are living, right?
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:17 AM
 
1,500 posts, read 2,347,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulAS1 View Post
I think I will tell the executioner (who's not someone from my family) but I'll leave my family out of it because they are very judgemental and would want to keep me on life support even when death is inevitable.
'Executioner' gave me a great mental image.

Give a copy to the executor of your estate, your physicians, and the hospital if there is one you routinely use/would use.

I understand that some people may get preachy and act like they know better - we all have THAT person in our family - but surely you have at least one person who you trust to act on your behalf with YOUR wishes, not theirs. I'm sure that's the person you've named in your health care power of attorney and HIPAA waiver?

In my family I'm the designated plug-puller. They trust me to do what they ask. And they also (lovingly) call me a cold-hearted b#$%#. LOL! Seriously, I think it's an honor to be trusted with that decision. I am sure your proxy feels the same way. It's not anyone else's business.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:18 AM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,772,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulAS1 View Post
I think I will tell the executioner (who's not someone from my family) but I'll leave my family out of it because they are very judgemental and would want to keep me on life support even when death is inevitable.
"Executor," not "executioner." In this context, that is a huge difference.

If you have a doctor, you need to give him or her a copy of your living will. Also, any time you check into a hospital or go to the ER they ask if you have one, so you can give them one.

If you just tell a friend, that friend may not have authority to even talk to the doctor on your behalf. Your family needs to know your wishes, even if they disagree with them. You're not going to be able to contradict what they tell the doctor if you're unconscious.

If you feel strongly about this, your best bet is to pay for a consultation with an attorney who specializes in probate matters who can advise you and draw up binding legal documents.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Yes tell your next of kin that you have a living will and medical directive. In most living wills you name a family member, or other individual, as your medical proxy to make decisions if you are not able. Tell that person that you have the living will, what it says (i.e. "DNR, or no respirator, or whatever) and ask them to respect your wishes. You can also place a copy of it in a container in your fridge and there is a sticker to place on the fridge door to tell emergency personnel that your medical directive is inside the fridge. Emergency responders are taught to check the fridge door for this info. I would also get a medic alert bracelet if it's something as short as "do not resuscitate".
Sorry for the mispelling, I've already fixed it. I didn't know that about the fridge, it's a good idea.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:27 AM
 
64 posts, read 58,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
If you have a doctor, you need to give him or her a copy of your living will. Also, any time you check into a hospital or go to the ER they ask if you have one, so you can give them one.
I don't have a doctor but I'll keep a copy with me the whole time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
If you just tell a friend, that friend may not have authority to even talk to the doctor on your behalf. Your family needs to know your wishes, even if they disagree with them. You're not going to be able to contradict what they tell the doctor if you're unconscious.
The executor is kind of a neutral person. It's not family and it's not a friend but it's a person I highly trust. Wouldn't he have the power even when the will shows that he's the executor? What will they say? That the will is fabricated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
If you feel strongly about this, your best bet is to pay for a consultation with an attorney who specializes in probate matters who can advise you and draw up binding legal documents.

Thanks.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,823 posts, read 2,386,205 times
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Here's a question...at what age should you start a will?
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Old 12-31-2013, 09:21 AM
 
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A living will like the topic of this post ? - when you reach legal age, generally 18, and can make your own wishes known about how you wish to treated in medical emergency.

A will for personal property and real estate ?- when you have some. Again, any time after reaching legal age. You don't have to accumulate much. Even if you just have collections or mementos you want to leave to someone if you should die, you can have a will stipulating where they go.

A will can also be used to direct what is to be done with your body after death.If you want to be buried in some particular way and have the funds for it, use a will, if you want to be cremated, use a will to direct that.

In other words you don't have to be elderly to have a will. We never know what life will throw at us, so when you are legally of age it doesn't hurt to let your choices be known via a will.
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