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Old 08-22-2014, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,143 posts, read 11,044,310 times
Reputation: 12386

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Quote:
Originally Posted by David910 View Post
Let me start off by saying that I think that the Ice Bucket Challenge is, in theory, a good idea. I'm sure it has raised a lot of money, and it certainly has raised awareness for ALS. However, I have also noticed that some people are using it for their "15 minutes of fame". Without donating a cent to ALS, some people are posting these "crazy" videos before passing it off to their friends, or someone they think it would be "funny" to dump the ice water on. As I have seen these videos pop up on social media, it is becoming increasingly clear to me that a lot of people who are doing it couldn't give a rats ass about ALS, but just want to post that video so they can rake in the "likes" and show everyone how awesome they are. This was further enhanced when someone nominated me and I didn't do it, not wanting to fall into this game. When I told someone this, they were shocked and said that if I didn't do it 24 hours after I was nominated, I would "have to donate money". Oookay. I said I would rather donate money than get ice water dumped on me when I was pretty sick. Couldn't believe the guy just said that.

It got me thinking about all of the rest of things that people do on social media, just for attention. I have now realized that those long posts on birthdays with pictures on social media that 20 people post per day? Almost all for attention. If these people wanted to, they could personally wish each other happy birthday or send a private message. But instead, for everyone else to see (and "like" of course), they post these things on social media as a sort of publicity stunt.

I don't know if I'm being cynical here. What are y'alls thoughts?
WHO CARES? It's a brilliant promotion.
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: galaxy far far away
3,111 posts, read 4,544,866 times
Reputation: 7201
A Compilation Of People Completely Screwing Up The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge - Digg
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:13 AM
 
14,396 posts, read 17,268,412 times
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I used to do this to my ex-husband when he was in the shower all the time, except it'd be a large cup not a bucket. It was so funny. LOL
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:44 AM
 
28,906 posts, read 46,598,421 times
Reputation: 46000
Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
WHO CARES? It's a brilliant promotion.
Well, if the ends are all that matter, why not just rob liquor stores?
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Old 08-22-2014, 12:52 PM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,775,120 times
Reputation: 25416
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Well, if the ends are all that matter, why not just rob liquor stores?
How can you equate a silly stunt like pouring icewater over your head with robbing a liquor store?

Are you equally opposed to fun runs or walks? Fundraising concerts such as We Are the World or Farm Aid? Galas/dinners/dances? Barbeque cookoffs? Blue jeans for babies? Telethons? Auctions? Celebrity roasts? Zombie walks? Bake sales?

At any of the above, participants could just cut a check or put some money in a bucket and be done. But successful fundraising makes donors feel like they're a part of something bigger, which is why I think this ice-bucket challenge is such a big deal. It's an opportunity to join in a huge community that is working together to do something important. Of course not everyone who participates is donating, but the last time I looked, $15 million had been raised. That could go a long way toward working for treatment or a cure of this awful disease.

I just don't understand why you're opposed to people having fun while millions of dollars are being raised for a very deserving charity. Since when does making a donation or bringing awareness to an illness have to be a serious, solemn occasion?

As for the complaints that it's all over social media, it won't last forever. Then we can all go back to a non-stop barrage of extremists beheading innocent people, children being killed by rockets, children hiking hundreds of miles in the most extreme conditions imaginable to escape violence, unarmed men being shot by police and riots in the streets, and the rumblings of a new Cold War. You know, all that great news we usually get to listen to.

Honestly, if all anyone has to complain about is that they don't like the ice-bucket challenge, they should pause and give thanks to whatever power they believe in that life is great.
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Old 08-22-2014, 01:09 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 46,598,421 times
Reputation: 46000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
How can you equate a silly stunt like pouring icewater over your head with robbing a liquor store?

Are you equally opposed to fun runs or walks? Fundraising concerts such as We Are the World or Farm Aid? Galas/dinners/dances? Barbeque cookoffs? Blue jeans for babies? Telethons? Auctions? Celebrity roasts? Zombie walks? Bake sales?

At any of the above, participants could just cut a check or put some money in a bucket and be done. But successful fundraising makes donors feel like they're a part of something bigger, which is why I think this ice-bucket challenge is such a big deal. It's an opportunity to join in a huge community that is working together to do something important. Of course not everyone who participates is donating, but the last time I looked, $15 million had been raised. That could go a long way toward working for treatment or a cure of this awful disease.

I just don't understand why you're opposed to people having fun while millions of dollars are being raised for a very deserving charity. Since when does making a donation or bringing awareness to an illness have to be a serious, solemn occasion?

As for the complaints that it's all over social media, it won't last forever. Then we can all go back to a non-stop barrage of extremists beheading innocent people, children being killed by rockets, children hiking hundreds of miles in the most extreme conditions imaginable to escape violence, unarmed men being shot by police and riots in the streets, and the rumblings of a new Cold War. You know, all that great news we usually get to listen to.

Honestly, if all anyone has to complain about is that they don't like the ice-bucket challenge, they should pause and give thanks to whatever power they believe in that life is great.
Why? Because I've had five different challenges in the past three days, that's why. And to each of them, I've had to say, "Why, no thank you," to their obvious disappointment. I mean, heck, just look at the word "challenge" in and of itself. If that isn't aggressive in nature, then what is?

So while part of the stunt is just good old-fashioned exhibitionism, part of it is indeed peer pressure. I mean, when I have to steel myself to tell an eager client, "No, I don't want a bucket of ice water dumped on my head," then that's when it crosses the line. When an effort like this relies on calling people out, then it stops being a fundraiser and becomes a shakedown. I'm guessing you haven't considered it from that perspective, have you?

And it's certainly not because I don't contribute to charity. I just don't feel like proclaiming my altruism while I do it, expecting applause from my circle of acquaintances.

Here's the deal. Fun Runs, telethons, celebrity roasts, whatever, are one thing. This is something else entirely. It's part "look at me look at me look at me" and part "Why aren't you doing this? What is wrong with you?" It's not quite as coercive as sticking up a Circle K, but it's coercive enough in my book.

Last edited by cpg35223; 08-22-2014 at 01:29 PM..
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Old 08-22-2014, 01:30 PM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,775,120 times
Reputation: 25416
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Why? Because I've had five different challenges in the past three days, that's why. And to each of them, I've had to say, "Why, no thank you," to their obvious disappointment. So while part of the stunt is just good old-fashioned exhibitionism, part of it is peer pressure. I mean, when I have to steel myself to tell an eager client, "No, I don't want a bucket of ice water dumped on my head," then that's when it crosses the line. When an effort like this relies on calling people out, then it stops being a fundraiser and becomes a shakedown. I'm guessing you haven't considered it from that perspective, have you?

And it's certainly not because I don't contribute to charity. I just don't feel like proclaiming my altruism while I do it, expecting applause from my circle of acquaintances.

Here's the deal. Fun Runs, telethons, celebrity roasts, whatever, are one thing. This is something else entirely. It's part "look at me look at me look at me" and part "Why aren't you doing this? What is wrong with you?" It's not quite as coercive as sticking up a Circle K, but it's coercive enough in my book.
IMO it's less coercive than Girl Scouts selling cookies outside of Home Depot. Talk about a shakedown.

And yes, I have considered it from the peer pressure perspective and I consider it a positive. I don't mind being challenged to do something good or fun. And anyone who wants to can say "no." Heck, you can even lie and say you already donated if it bothers you so much.

As far as the other fundraisers being one thing and this another, how so? Every Sunday in the society pages of our local newspaper there are multiple pictures of people who attended some sort of fundraiser during the week. All of those people could have chosen to stay home, or they could have moved away when the photographer showed up. But they don't. They get dressed up, go to an event and then stand there proudly beaming at the camera because they're having fun and publicly supporting a charity at the same time. And there's nothing wrong with that.
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Old 08-22-2014, 01:37 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 46,598,421 times
Reputation: 46000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
IMO it's less coercive than Girl Scouts selling cookies outside of Home Depot. Talk about a shakedown.

And yes, I have considered it from the peer pressure perspective and I consider it a positive. I don't mind being challenged to do something good or fun. And anyone who wants to can say "no." Heck, you can even lie and say you already donated if it bothers you so much.

As far as the other fundraisers being one thing and this another, how so? Every Sunday in the society pages of our local newspaper there are multiple pictures of people who attended some sort of fundraiser during the week. All of those people could have chosen to stay home, or they could have move away when the photographer showed up. But they don't. They get dressed up, go to an event and then stand there proudly beaming at the camera because they're having fun and publicly supporting a charity at the same time. And there's nothing wrong with that.
Your argument holds absolutely no water. Even ice water.

I don't have an issue with strolling past the Girl Scout cookie stand at Home Depot, even though I'm a sucker for Thin Mints, for they are mass marketing. And if I get an invitation in the mail to Rodeo For Rabies or some other such event, I have the option to ignore it. If I go, it will be because either a) I support the organization and its objectives or b) because I think it's going to be a great night out.

But when a client phones you up and says, "Hey, I challenge you to dump a bucket of ice water on your head," that's something completely different. And while you evidently think casual dishonesty isn't a bad thing, I really don't feel like lying to someone about having done it.
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Old 08-22-2014, 02:09 PM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,775,120 times
Reputation: 25416
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Your argument holds absolutely no water. Even ice water.

I don't have an issue with strolling past the Girl Scout cookie stand at Home Depot, even though I'm a sucker for Thin Mints, for they are mass marketing. And if I get an invitation in the mail to Rodeo For Rabies or some other such event, I have the option to ignore it. If I go, it will be because either a) I support the organization and its objectives or b) because I think it's going to be a great night out.

But when a client phones you up and says, "Hey, I challenge you to dump a bucket of ice water on your head," that's something completely different. And while you evidently think casual dishonesty isn't a bad thing, I really don't feel like lying to someone about having done it.
Well, I guess we're just different then. I have a very hard time passing up an adorable second-grader in a Brownie uniform hawking cookies. I can hardly stand to say "no" and usually end up buying some even though I never otherwise buy packaged cookies.

And I did not condone casual lying. You seem so burdened by the idea of saying "no" that I thought you would welcome the notion of getting out of it without disappointing a client. What if your client was the one inviting you to Rodeo for Rabies? Or asking you to buy a raffle ticket for his church fundraiser? Would you feel some pressure to attend then? I just don't think those things are very different from being asked to either participate in the ice-bucket challenge or donate money to ALS. Saying "no" is always a viable option.
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Old 08-22-2014, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
9,043 posts, read 8,289,788 times
Reputation: 19267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
How can you equate a silly stunt like pouring icewater over your head with robbing a liquor store?

Are you equally opposed to fun runs or walks? Fundraising concerts such as We Are the World or Farm Aid? Galas/dinners/dances? Barbeque cookoffs? Blue jeans for babies? Telethons? Auctions? Celebrity roasts? Zombie walks? Bake sales?

At any of the above, participants could just cut a check or put some money in a bucket and be done. But successful fundraising makes donors feel like they're a part of something bigger, which is why I think this ice-bucket challenge is such a big deal. It's an opportunity to join in a huge community that is working together to do something important. Of course not everyone who participates is donating, but the last time I looked, $15 million had been raised. That could go a long way toward working for treatment or a cure of this awful disease.

I just don't understand why you're opposed to people having fun while millions of dollars are being raised for a very deserving charity. Since when does making a donation or bringing awareness to an illness have to be a serious, solemn occasion?

As for the complaints that it's all over social media, it won't last forever. Then we can all go back to a non-stop barrage of extremists beheading innocent people, children being killed by rockets, children hiking hundreds of miles in the most extreme conditions imaginable to escape violence, unarmed men being shot by police and riots in the streets, and the rumblings of a new Cold War. You know, all that great news we usually get to listen to.

Honestly, if all anyone has to complain about is that they don't like the ice-bucket challenge, they should pause and give thanks to whatever power they believe in that life is great.
This was beautifully written.

In my FB newsfeed, two friends had added a video about a guy who did the ice bucket challenge and then went on to say that both his grandmother and mother had ALS, and he, at 26, had just been diagnosed. He was thrilled with any attention it's getting because ALS has ravaged two people in his family, and he's next, with no treatments to delay or cure your body shutting down slowly and killing you from the outside in, all the while, your mind being fully sharp and aware of what is happening.
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