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Old 06-22-2017, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Empire State of Philly
1,746 posts, read 1,274,091 times
Reputation: 2986

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Hi all,

I had a pretty bad day at work today, so I may take things personally when I shouldn't and therefore need some perspective.

On Tuesday, I was assigned a task for the biggest client we have. It was highly numerical. I had no training on this material, nor were my teammates willing to give me any. It's usually performed by someone who has been in the company for around 25 years or my own (overseas) manager who is a director. They don't give this task to analysts (I joined the company 9 months ago).

I was given this project with almost no instructions, left to figure it out by myself (I work in a different location from my team). The report was due the following day before a certain cut-off time. My manager or the colleague who usually do it weren't going to be there, hence this delegation.

It was my first time doing it. It's completely different from what I do on a daily basis. No one was there to help. Thankfully, I didn't need any because I figured it all out fairly quickly.

Once done, the report had to be proof-read by someone else. It was forwarded to one of their colleagues who has been in the company for about 20 years or so. Hence, he knows the ins and outs. He came back, saying it was perfect, no mistake.

Fine, it was submitted for input. Today, the nightmare happened. There was a small typo in the report (so, tiny that no one noticed) which blocked the input of one out of the three reports in our systems.

Understandably so, my manager was mad. I had double-checked everything before submitting for proof-reading, but it happened nevertheless.

Subsequently, I got an almost all caps message from my manager saying I have "learned my lesson" yadi yada.

Then, the colleague who delegated her work told me: "If we learn one thing every day, we'll be very intelligent by the end of our lives".

I understand this typo triggered a "severe" issue. But what if I didn't understand the assignment at all? What if I had done the assignment backwards and they had to re-do it themselves instead? Especially as my colleague asked me "Are you sure it's not too difficult for you, given you have no training"? I said it was fine. There's always a risk when you have no training and are working in two different locations.

No instead, they chose to e-yell at me for a typo. I spent my entire morning on this project and I got yelled at in the most patronizing manner. This is the first time my manager ever yelled at me, when we're usually close.

I mean, they should also put things in perspective. I didn't ask any questions, did the work perfectly with no training ... this should be a relief to them as they were stuck. The typo should have been spotted during proof-reading. I took full responsibility for this typo. Yet, I'm not sure they'll assign me such work ever again.

Honestly, I reached a point of no return where I even went to the bathroom to cry. I've been working from 7.30 to 6pm, taking on ad-hoc tasks, tasks other colleagues don't want to work on, correcting people's mistakes, training a girl who doesn't want to be trained and tells me she prefers me to work on the task ... All this, to be yelled at because of a typo?

I didn't even get a "thank you" from the person who delegated her project onto me.

My manager has always been extremely supportive of me and complimentary of my work. The day I get assigned a task for a massive client and do it well, she's mad because of a typo. I understand there is the client's relationship at stake, but we work with clients all day long.

Last edited by LostinPhilly; 06-22-2017 at 12:00 PM..
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
3,806 posts, read 1,614,914 times
Reputation: 9953
Sounds like the buck stopped with you. You got a project dumped on you, and they're fussing about a minor glitch.

Do you suppose they're setting you up to fail?
Do you want to keep working the long hours with these people?
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:42 AM
 
Location: SoCal again
15,930 posts, read 12,709,689 times
Reputation: 31105
Life can be tough.


I totally understand your frustration. I hope you feel better soon!
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Empire State of Philly
1,746 posts, read 1,274,091 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
Sounds like the buck stopped with you. You got a project dumped on you, and they're fussing about a minor glitch.

Do you suppose they're setting you up to fail?
Do you want to keep working the long hours with these people?
I cannot believe they actually escalated this to my overseas manager who was attending a conference abroad, had no internet contact and managed to send me an email a few minutes after the typo issue came out.

I don't think they're setting me up to fail. My overseas manager has bragged about my work to my onshore manager and the head of the department. She's so nice to me, like a mentor. She never ever e-yelled at me or blamed me for anything, until today when I chose to take the whole responsibility on my shoulders. This "lesson learned" all in caps, really hurt my feelings, because I did my work perfectly, especially as it was my first time and I got delegated this task the day before.

It was my manager's idea to give me the big clients because she's fully aware of my capabilities. Instead of providing positive reinforcement, I got dragged through the mud. It was my first big deal and it meant a lot to me to do it right, to gain their trust with such deals. It's ruined now, because of a typo (two numbers that got placed in reverse).


This is simply that I do not understand why she went off on me like that today, because of a small typo in an entire report that takes hours to figure out and elaborate. On top of this, the girl that was supposed to be my back-up for when I'm handling larger clients, declined to reply to my emails while I was working on the report. When I came back, she told me: "I forgot". I therefore wound up with a severe backlog to filter out and had to stay late.

Then, the person who delegated her work onto me had the guts to send me an email this morning saying "Hi colleagues" (I was the sole recipient and it was not a forward email).

I feel as though I have become a bit of a pushover.

I also had an instance with another colleague who blatantly deleted my email I sent him three weeks ago. Then, he got a reminder from another colleague. He said to that colleague he never received any documents, when the email I sent him contained the documents. He just didn't bother reading. I called him up on the phone and he blatantly told me: "I didn't see it, I can't find it, send it to me again". And at the end of the day, he provides updates with no background information, which makes me look like a fool. I don't have time to call everyone on the phone to ask if they got my email. It is their prerogative to read emails.
This same guy also blamed me for not checking documents properly. He escalated to my manager. Then it turns out the documents were fine as I checked them, and it was the compliance officer who extrapolated the requirements that didn't even exist in the first place.

I'm getting blamed for their shortcomings. I cannot handle this. I'm as transparent as it gets. Yet, I think I'm getting walked all over. I do my work correctly, and due to other people's inability to work efficiently, I get the short end of the stick (i.e: the blame).
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:57 AM
 
9,660 posts, read 4,904,547 times
Reputation: 33347
Stand up for yourself. Tell them (in a non-aggressive way) that while you take the blame for the typo, it doesn't change the fact that you were able to complete the work perfectly without any training and without anyone available to you for questions.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:59 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,001 posts, read 69,929,188 times
Reputation: 75777
OP, I'm not sure what you're referring to in asking "Was she calling me stupid?"

But the manager's comment about you learning your lesson makes no sense to me. What's the lesson you were supposed to learn? Honestly, I think you should ask her. Was it that you shouldn't accept assignments that are too advanced for new hires at your level? Was it that you should have given it to one more person to proofread, as a fail-safe in case the first proofreader (and you) missed a small detail? I really think you should ask her to clarify her comment. You could say you'd like to learn, because you certainly want to avoid making any error like that ever again. (Though this would open the door to her screaming, "Don't worry" We're never going to give you anything like this again!", so maybe a slightly different approach would be better.)

I'm also surprised that someone who's only been on the job for a few months was charged with training someone brand-new. It sounds like, with all the tasks they're giving you, someone (your manager) feels you're highly capable and catch on fast. But they don't seem to be giving you credit for that. Have they given you a raise, since you started? If you're training someone (which usually involved a basic level of supervising), that's a level of responsibility that usually warrants a step up in pay. It's a benchmark kind of thing. You're now a trainer, in addition to your usual duties, and should be compensated as such.
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Empire State of Philly
1,746 posts, read 1,274,091 times
Reputation: 2986
To me, this project was not too advanced. If it was "too advanced" I wouldn't have completed it with almost no mistake. The mistake was simply a typing one, not a calculation one. I agree however, that from the looks of it, it was an extremely advanced project.

This was my chance at maybe getting promoted, but this minor issue has now jeopardized it. I do not think they are going to trust me with such projects moving forward, even though I did this one perfectly.

The person I am training is not a new-joiner. She has been in the company for a year. However, due to extenuating circumstances, they asked me to train her as my back-up, while I'm being shifted onto bigger deals. This girl thinks it's unfair I am getting shifted onto bigger deals (and she made it clear she dislikes my advancement), so she is trying her best to sabotage me, I believe. That's why she didn't reply to the emails, as we have a common mailbox and my overseas manager can see the backlog.

I'm training her, taking on extra projects because my overseas team declines working on them so my overseas manager assigns me instead, some guy left her team and she assigned me all of his work, I was asked to write a procedural guide... I pulled tons of extra hours, worked public holidays ... only to get dragged through the mud because of a typing mistake. This is unreal.

I like the fact that they're relying on me, but I do not abide by disrespect.
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:10 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,001 posts, read 69,929,188 times
Reputation: 75777
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostinPhilly View Post
I cannot believe they actually escalated this to my overseas manager who was attending a conference abroad, had no internet contact and managed to send me an email a few minutes after the typo issue came out.

I don't think they're setting me up to fail. My overseas manager has bragged about my work to my onshore manager and the head of the department. She's so nice to me, like a mentor. She never ever e-yelled at me or blamed me for anything, until today when I chose to take the whole responsibility on my shoulders. This "lesson learned" all in caps, really hurt my feelings, because I did my work perfectly, especially as it was my first time and I got delegated this task the day before.

It was my manager's idea to give me the big clients because she's fully aware of my capabilities. Instead of providing positive reinforcement, I got dragged through the mud. It was my first big deal and it meant a lot to me to do it right, to gain their trust with such deals. It's ruined now, because of a typo (two numbers that got placed in reverse).

This is simply that I do not understand why she went off on me like that today, because of a small typo in an entire report that takes hours to figure out and elaborate. On top of this, the girl that was supposed to be my back-up for when I'm handling larger clients, declined to reply to my emails while I was working on the report. When I came back, she told me: "I forgot". I therefore wound up with a severe backlog to filter out and had to stay late.

Then, the person who delegated her work onto me had the guts to send me an email this morning saying "Hi colleagues" (I was the sole recipient and it was not a forward email).

I feel as though I have become a bit of a pushover.

I also had an instance with another colleague who blatantly deleted my email I sent him three weeks ago. Then, he got a reminder from another colleague. He said to that colleague he never received any documents, when the email I sent him contained the documents. He just didn't bother reading. I called him up on the phone and he blatantly told me: "I didn't see it, I can't find it, send it to me again". And at the end of the day, he provides updates with no background information, which makes me look like a fool. I don't have time to call everyone on the phone to ask if they got my email. It is their prerogative to read emails.
This same guy also blamed me for not checking documents properly. He escalated to my manager. Then it turns out the documents were fine as I checked them, and it was the compliance officer who extrapolated the requirements that didn't even exist in the first place.

I'm getting blamed for their shortcomings. I cannot handle this. I'm as transparent as it gets. Yet, I think I'm getting walked all over. I do my work correctly, and due to other people's inability to work efficiently, I get the short end of the stick (i.e: the blame).
You should call that (bolded) to the attention of the overseas manager, as she's the one who's usually on your side. And you do need to clarify what she meant by "lesson learned". WTF is that supposed to mean?!

RE: getting blamed for others' shortcomings--you need to be reporting this to a superior. Others are either flaking out, or are deliberately sabotaging your efforts (the email-deletion incident looks suspiciously like that). Maybe certain people (the guy who deleted your email?) are resentful of the fact that you haven't even been there a year, but are working at an advanced level, behaving more or less like a peer to people who have been there longer? (Not saying there's anything wrong with that; you're just doing what you need to do, communicating as required, to move things along & get work done.) But you need to let a superior know about this, so you don't end up taking the flack for all these incidents.

For ex., you could ask your supervisor something along the lines of, "I've been trying to work with (name) regarding Y project, but he deletes my emails that contain all the info and instructions, then says I never sent them to him. What would you suggest to move this forward? Is there a better person to coordinate with on this?" That way it doesn't sound like tattling, but it puts her/him on notice that someone's being uncooperative.

I've run into situations where an organization kind of booby-traps things, and blames the newcomer for their own mistakes and lack of organizational skills. Ironically, the person getting blamed often is their most talented team-member, who could make groundbreaking contributions to the org, if everyone would only get off their high horse. But some cultures or organizational environments are into scapegoating. If that's the case (your job doesn't sound that bad, not thus far), the only solution is to get out.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 06-22-2017 at 12:20 PM..
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Empire State of Philly
1,746 posts, read 1,274,091 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
You should call that (bolded) to the attention of the overseas manager, as she's the one who's usually on your side. And you do need to clarify what she meant by "lesson learned". WTF is that supposed to mean?!

RE: getting blamed for others' shortcomings--you need to be reporting this to a superior. Others are either flaking out, or are deliberately sabotaging your efforts (the email-deletion incident looks suspiciously like that). Maybe certain people (the guy who deleted your email?) are resentful of the fact that you haven't even been there a year, but are working at an advanced level, behaving more or less like a peer to people who have been there longer? (Not saying there's anything wrong with that; you're just doing what you need to do, communicating as required, to move things along & get work done.)

I've run into situations where an organization kind of booby-traps things, and blames the newcomer for their own mistakes and lack of organizational skills. Ironically, the person getting blamed often is their most talented team-member, who could make groundbreaking contributions to the org, if everyone would only get off their high horse. But some cultures or organizational environments are into scapegoating. If that's the case (your job doesn't sound that bad), the only solution is to get out.
The guy who deliberately deleted my email is a director. He's been working there for around 10 years or so now. He's always had a strange dynamic with me. Many times, other people made mistakes and I ended up fixing them myself, when he was looking for a person to blame. I'm not suew what his deal is with me.

A bit of background:
He was supposed to provide me with an overview of his department when I joined. He kept re-scheduling every three hours or so. Yet, he had no issues asking me about going for drinks with him (and I don't know who). He probably put more effort into getting me to go for drinks with him and I don't know who, than he did in doing my overview (which he delegated to someone else in the end).

Then, after a few months, he started picking up the phone to call me instead of sending emails. This happened when he finally acknowledged my presence in the company. Fine.

One day, when he escalated my supposed lack of diligence when checking the documents, to my manager .. I chose to call him to understand. I called him, said "Hi" and he put me on mute right away. Then, he unmuted the phone and I overheard him laughing with his trainee and other colleague about my last name! I have a foreign sounding last name and he was making jokes about how to pronounce it. He realized I was slightly frustrated because of his escalation and was in no mood to joke. He said "You're not impressed", to which I replied "not really". Then, he kept apologizing profusely during the conversation, but my mind disconnected.

I have only called him once since, only to realize he deleted my email.

He's very strange with me. I have no clue why he is like that, when he seemed to be decent to my other colleague who recently left (he's a guy. I'm a woman, so maybe he views me as below him).

All of my overseas team has been in the corporation for 10 years +. They're all well above 40. I don't understand why I get such treatment.

Last edited by LostinPhilly; 06-22-2017 at 12:42 PM..
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Empire State of Philly
1,746 posts, read 1,274,091 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
You were assigned a task, did not ask for guidance and what you call a typo kept the work from going its assigned route.
Haha, you must be joking right?!

Did you read what I wrote in my post? Do you know what a "typo" is? Do you know what proof-reading is for?

It was not a typo due to a lack of understanding of the material, otherwise it would not be called a typo but an actual mistake.
This was not a mistake of substance. It was a typing mistake - like - casr instead of cars!

My colleague said I did it perfectly and even congratulated me (adding my manager in copy).
Do you really think he would have submitted the work had the proof-reading showed substantial calculation mistakes? Are you serious?

Do I need to ask for guidance to write a series of figures correctly now? It was not a calculation error or a procedural one.
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