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Old 01-25-2019, 06:08 AM
 
606 posts, read 259,221 times
Reputation: 1452

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When we moved to where we are, our neighbor came by and introduced himself. And asked if and when I was willing to sell back 2 acres of our land. Thanks, but no thanks.

We exchanged formalities and I declined his offer. Told him that I have other things to worry about at the moment due to relocation. Also told him that we're private and respect our neighbors privacy. He was cool with that.

Every now and then when we're both outside working on something, we'll make small talk, ask about how we're faring...if you need something, don't hesitate to ask.

We watch each other's properties when working or out on vacation. We notify each other when something is out of the ordinary.

We're not great friends but respects each other's privacy.

Forgot to mention that we live in a rural area. We were just sick and tired of the city life, the constant locking everything down so it wouldn't walk off, the loud music coming from the homies car, loud people hollering down the road so everyone knows their conversation....

We found our peace and quiet. But........looking forward to selling our place to move up north, out of state. Been here all our lives and it's time to move on, since all of the children are adults now.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:11 AM
 
606 posts, read 259,221 times
Reputation: 1452
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
I will neighborly bring over some venison and ask them nicely not to post their land (no hunting)
You would definitely be more than welcome to bring some and hunt on my land if we were there!!!
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:39 AM
 
5,371 posts, read 2,241,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I would wait until we were outside at the same time, if it were a situation of private house, or until we met at the elevator or entrance if it were an apartment building. I would just say, "Hi, I'm Joe Smith, your neighbor. I hope you enjoy living in the neighborhood."

I cannot imagine not introducing myself to a new neighbor, it strikes me as standoffish at best and hostile at the worst.

However, I grew up in an America where we did this, but it is clear that since the late 20th century so many Americans have become obsessively self-engrossed that the entire culture is different now. At the present time "neighbor" seems to mean the stranger - or SOB - who lives next to me.

They are too busy banging out angry screeds on Facebook or City Data.

The simple act of knowing one's neighbor isn't necessarily about establishing a friendship, but more of an act of self-interest and playing a role in the community. What if something happens to your place while you're away? What if you realized that you had left something undone at home? Or, vice versa, what if something happens at your neighbor's home? How would you reach them?

We just moved. But in our previous home, we knew our neighbors across the street. Good people, even if the guy was a little too obsessive about his conservative politics. As in, every conversation topic somehow led back to Nancy Pelosi. Yet, aside from that, they were pretty great people.

Last Spring, my wife and I were on an overseas trip when my neighbor called. He wanted to be sure we knew that our sprinkler was going in the back yard. My wife had turned it one and forgotten to turn it off when our Uber picked us up. I asked if he would kindly turn it off. Now, if the guy had no way to contact me, or decided it just wasn't his business, we would have returned to a total disaster in our backyard two weeks later.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Australia
842 posts, read 308,798 times
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Gosh, many of these answers surprise me as I had the belief that Americans are very friendly. We had two experiences at our previous home. The first new neighbours were doctors and one Lebanese and the other Russian. They knocked on our door, all dressed up, one Saturday afternoon, with their kids in tow and formally introduced themselves. Obviously expected to be invited in, which I did. Then had to find my DH who was, I think, pulling apart a computer upstairs, to come and help me out. A couple of years later our new neighbours from behind our house, who we would never normally see because of the size of the block, did the same thing. They were Japanese. I can only assume that the custom of both these neighbours was to make a formal introduction. Whereas we Anglo Aussies tend to go more for the informal intro when people are out in the yard or street. However when we moved to our current place, one neighbour knocked on the door and presented us with a beautiful bunch of flowers. I thought it was lovely and I might add we have rarely spoken to her since simply because of the logistics of our street. But when we found a red bellied black snake in our house a few years ago I went to inform the neighbours as these snakes are dangerous. It was good then to be acquainted with them all.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:12 AM
 
Location: 60630
12,221 posts, read 17,923,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post

However, I grew up in an America where we did this, but it is clear that since the late 20th century so many Americans have become obsessively self-engrossed that the entire culture is different now. At the present time "neighbor" seems to mean the stranger - or SOB - who lives next to me.
Yup..
Totally agree.
I think it's generational.
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Old 01-26-2019, 08:22 AM
 
5,371 posts, read 2,241,923 times
Reputation: 16143
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Gosh, many of these answers surprise me as I had the belief that Americans are very friendly. We had two experiences at our previous home. The first new neighbours were doctors and one Lebanese and the other Russian. They knocked on our door, all dressed up, one Saturday afternoon, with their kids in tow and formally introduced themselves. Obviously expected to be invited in, which I did. Then had to find my DH who was, I think, pulling apart a computer upstairs, to come and help me out. A couple of years later our new neighbours from behind our house, who we would never normally see because of the size of the block, did the same thing. They were Japanese. I can only assume that the custom of both these neighbours was to make a formal introduction. Whereas we Anglo Aussies tend to go more for the informal intro when people are out in the yard or street. However when we moved to our current place, one neighbour knocked on the door and presented us with a beautiful bunch of flowers. I thought it was lovely and I might add we have rarely spoken to her since simply because of the logistics of our street. But when we found a red bellied black snake in our house a few years ago I went to inform the neighbours as these snakes are dangerous. It was good then to be acquainted with them all.

On the whole, we typically are. Don't let a few neurotic cranks on a message board convince you otherwise.
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Old 01-30-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,740 posts, read 12,637,025 times
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So apparently, my new neighbors must really want me to talk to them because they and their visitors keep blocking my driveway. I have not formally introduced myself yet, but I did have to go over and knock on their door today just to tell them to move their car. What rude and inconsiderate jerks they are.
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Old 01-31-2019, 03:36 AM
 
947 posts, read 353,113 times
Reputation: 1709
Quote:
Originally Posted by head librarian View Post
I live in a Townhouse and have neighbors on either side of us. The townhouse on one side of us was empty for a few months but a few weeks ago a new couple moved in. I saw them come out of their home and went over to introduce myself. (We share walls so we have common interests.)

I was completely shocked by how cold and standoffish they were. They seemed insulted and bothered that I would take even a minute of their valuable time to approach them and introduce myself. Their reaction seemed to be that there was no reason to bother them just because we were neighbors. I just wanted to talk to them for a minute or less knowing how busy people are today.

My wife asked me why I even bothered because nowadays most people don't talk to their neighbors. So the new neighbors likely thought I was bothering them. They thought: "You live next door, SO?"

So, would you approach a new neighbor who just moved in just to say hello and introduce yourself?
I would, because I'm southern. I actually did a couple of weeks ago-helped her hook up her roku on her tv.When we moved in 6 months ago, our neighbors had a bbq for us to welcome us to the neighborhood.
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Old 01-31-2019, 06:03 AM
 
1,928 posts, read 944,268 times
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Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
I would, because I'm southern. I actually did a couple of weeks ago-helped her hook up her roku on her tv.When we moved in 6 months ago, our neighbors had a bbq for us to welcome us to the neighborhood.
I have to say that I lived in the deep South for a few years, and was not prepared for the friendliness. I was convinced--as a black man--I was going to have to go toe to toe with some inbred klansman but quite the opposite. There was even an elderly woman who ran a comic book shop after her husband died and the memory of her genuine kindness brings a tear to my eye when I remember her. Some of the nicest people ever in Tennessee.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:11 PM
 
758 posts, read 177,608 times
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i like the european idea of'getting to know' someone--take your time listening to and finding out about their general opinions of common issues. *then* decide whether or not you want a relationship!
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