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Old 12-26-2008, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Alaska
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One thing I recommend you do is to train your dog it's OK for you to take a toy or food away from him. We rescued a German Shepherd last spring and he was protective of his food and toys. I started immediately taking his food away, inspecting it and then giving it back. The first time he gave a low growl and I used my body to push him away and reprimanded him. It only took a couple of times to get him to stop. He now allows anyone to take things away without reacting.
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Old 12-26-2008, 01:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by akck View Post
The first time he gave a low growl and I used my body to push him away and reprimanded him. It only took a couple of times to get him to stop. He now allows anyone to take things away without reacting.
I grew up with an Australian Shepherd. One could have not asked for a better pet. If someone took her food or another item away, she would probably just follow you around, playing on your emotions with a sad look, hoping to get it back. And why shouldn't she have done this? After all, they rely on us (humans) to give them everything.
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Incognito
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Did you put him to sleep?
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Our Rottweiler is 8 y/o. You can train him out of that mode of being so protective of the toy so that he will not bite when someone grabs it. Ours used to bite when you grabbed it, he is fiercely protective of his "baby." One way we got ours out of doing that is by grabbing his collar at the scruff of the neck and pulling enough to get the point across while we took it out of his mouth. Took about 2 weeks to get him out of doing that. Today, he will growl only half of the time when you do it (we now do it without having to grab his collar), but he won't bite. He can sit across our laps with his "baby" in his mouth and we'll take it out and he will growl, sometimes show his teeth, but knows that it goes no further than that. You have to work with your dog on this, especially since you have an aggressive breed, like I do. You need to arrange the order in your house. Remember, dogs, especially aggressive breeds, understand things in "order." Alpha, etc. They catch on quickly, they are highly intelligent. With the collar grab, I started with "wrestling games" and pinning him down and not allowing him up when he tried to override the control. That is how they establish order in packs. It works like a charm. Other things follow, like my dog won't finish going up the stairs and will wait on the landing until I go past him first. He will not enter my room before I do and will wait for me to enter first. This all came naturally for him after we taught him order in his own language he can understand (through the wrestling/pinning down game). He does not jump on the bed (like he used to) until I am on it first, sometimes, he waits til he is called up on it We did this after he bit my son when my son took his fave toy out of his mouth, per the suggestion of a dog trainer that I called. No problems since. You can now take his toy out of his mouth without looking, even if he is growling big time and just say, "Yeah, ok...whatever." Have not had to strike him at all, have not had to yell at him or be mean. . . be loving, but firm. . .just work with him and make him understand in his OWN language. It's fixable - and quickly so.
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:02 AM
 
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I've always considered myself an animal lover, but in recent years, I'm waxing less and less in that direction. We were on a ski trip a few years ago, and my neighbor was coming over once a day to feed our cat and give her some company. She was getting ready to leave, and was scratching kitty's head (and this cat can be sooooo affectionate - hard to get her to leave you alone sometimes) and in a split second, the cat whipped her head up and bit the hand that seconds before, she was contentedly rubbing against. I was worried sick, since cat bites can be pretty bad. Neighbor had to get 1 stitch, and I apologized all over myself...and I came very VERY close to getting rid of the cat, but the neighbor was very kind, and really tried to play the whole thing down (they have 2 dogs...so they are "pet people" ). If it had not been for my son's pleading, I would have done so. If it were to happen again, that would be it. I thought a lot about that incident, and I think that she was so lonely, she knew the neighbor was getting ready to leave, and somehow her brain signaled displeasure...but still, it makes me uncomfortable.

I just don't want a pet, if it means that it could harm someone in such an unexpected manner like that. We do take precautions now with my son's friends, or anyone else that comes in...we always tell them to simply leave her alone. She has never bitten me or my son, and we have certainly given her plenty of opportunties (she loves staying under my son's bed and I have to chase her out every night...and I reach my hand under there...) It's hard to believe that she would, she is SUCH an affectionate kitty...so so sweet with us, but also incredibly playful and active. She is 7 now, so perhaps she will mellow a bit in the years to come. We'll see.

My brother has a German Shephard that he considers his baby. The dog was in the garage, untethered, and someone reached in and hit the garage door button to raise it. There was a lady walking her tiny chihuahua on the sidewalk and they were passing in front of the garage when it opened. Well, "baby" took off, and, yep....picked up that pooch like a rag doll and shook it. My brother paid a $1000 fine, and another thou in vet bills. He still has the dog, but if it had been me...I'd wouldn't. Sooo...I guess I'm not quite the animal lover I thought I was at one point. I'm sorry this happened at Christmas, but I'm glad your brother is so understanding. It could have been much worse. Consider yourself lucky, and forewarned. And please, use the suggestions put forth by JeepGirl. Anyone with dogs, especially protective/agressive breeds, should spend the time on proper training. I hope your brother recovers nicely.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:40 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,510,728 times
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Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
The dog was in the garage, untethered, and someone reached in and hit the garage door button to raise it. There was a lady walking her tiny chihuahua on the sidewalk and they were passing in front of the garage when it opened. Well, "baby" took off, and, yep....picked up that pooch like a rag doll and shook it. My brother paid a $1000 fine, and another thou in vet bills. He still has the dog,

Consider yourself lucky, and forewarned. And please, use the suggestions put forth by JeepGirl. Anyone with dogs, especially protective/agressive breeds, should spend the time on proper training. I hope your brother recovers nicely.
Wow...just wow. Stuff like that saddens me. It must have been the proximity to the Shepherd's turf. What I've usually noticed in smart dogs is that, like people, they seem to know what's "little" or "young" and have some empathy for it. Now, I certainly wouldn't expect that of a shark or an alligator, but I would of one of the smartest mammals out there. Sad.
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Old 12-27-2008, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Where there is too much snow!
6,076 posts, read 10,990,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcm58 View Post
I was sitting on the love seat watching my german shepard eating up the attention he was getting, tail wagging walking in a circle with a mouth full of teeth showing oh he was loving it, then my brother reached for his chew toy. I'm out of gauze bandage now, peroxide is getting low. I told my brother before he left that I wasn't going to hold up a picture of him anymore while I was smacking the dog around...lol
I guess there has to be some kind of drama or its not a Holiday!
If it would have been my dog bitting any of my family members, I would have giving it a treat and said, "good Boy". Then I would have taken the dog to the Vet to make sure it didn't get sick or die.
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Old 12-27-2008, 05:19 PM
 
8,415 posts, read 35,226,629 times
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Tail wagging can be a sign of anxiety. Just a FYI...If the teeth are out time to pull back. Its the dogs warning sign. Even if they are still being friendly. Think of it as a sarcastic smile...dog wise.
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Old 12-27-2008, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Incognito
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Again, did they put him to sleep yet?
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Old 12-27-2008, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
15,564 posts, read 36,473,016 times
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Originally Posted by Mr.Cat View Post
Again, did they put him to sleep yet?
No - but if you don't quit askin' you're gonna be taking a cat-nap!
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