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Old 11-20-2011, 02:19 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
12,334 posts, read 11,637,053 times
Reputation: 3935
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
Time to settle this once and for all!

I get all kinds of different opinions on exactly which "region" of the country that North Carolina is a part of. I mean, sure it's in the South as opposed to the North, but aside from that, a lot of North Carolinians seem to try to push North Carolina into the Mid-Atlantic region, or claim that it's sort of like another Virginia, as opposed to South Carolina or Georgia. I think it's hard to credibly make the claim that North Carolina is part of the Mid-Atlantic region though, one that stretches from Philadephia down to Richmond. I believe that North Carolina is best considered a part of the "Southeast."

There is a temptation to lump NC in with the Mid-Atlantic states due to all of the transplants that have inundated the Research Triangle and Charlotte. NC may feel less Southern to a lot of people who live in those cities, and politically it is trending similarly to Virginia. But geographically, historically, and culturally, North Carolina is a Southeastern state. North and South Carolina were settled by a different group of Europeans than were the Mid-Atlantic states, like Virginia. North Carolina joins South Carolina and Georgia as part of the pro-business "New South" set of economies that are trying to create a favorable business climate for economic growth, which is in effect causing all of those transplants to move down here as they look for jobs from relocated employers. And, let's get real here, if you get out your map of the United States, you'll find North Carolina in the Southeast portion of the country, not the middle of the eastern coastline.

As such, I think that North Carolina is best described as a Southeastern state, not a part of the Mid-Atlantic. Would enjoy hearing the community's views.
Read the Civil War series in Our State Magazine, particularly the story in the November issue. Get back to me after you read that series. As someone (a native Midwesterner) who spent most of my life in the MidAtlantic, in South Jersey, with ancestors in the Piedmont of colonial NC, I'll be happy to discuss it, after you read that series.
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:29 AM
 
Location: The Triad (nc)
16,352 posts, read 19,264,230 times
Reputation: 13212
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
Which "Region" is North Carolina in?
Start by deciding which region of NC you are referring to.
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:46 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
45 posts, read 44,903 times
Reputation: 110
Oh boy, here we go again!!! City-data might as well start a forum just for arguing about where NC is.
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Old 11-20-2011, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
640 posts, read 1,016,971 times
Reputation: 611
How many times do we need to post this same question over and over? It's getting weird.
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Old 11-20-2011, 11:32 AM
 
3,271 posts, read 744,718 times
Reputation: 1440
This is what happens when they take basic geography out of the curriculum.
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Old 11-20-2011, 12:10 PM
 
Location: The Triad (nc)
16,352 posts, read 19,264,230 times
Reputation: 13212
Quote:
Originally Posted by box_of_zip_disks View Post
This is what happens when they take basic geography out of the curriculum.
or confuse geography with sociology (or political science etc)
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Old 11-20-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
702 posts, read 734,166 times
Reputation: 296
National the region is the Southeast. We are considered a southern state due to the Mason Dixon Line.
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:29 PM
 
68 posts, read 60,911 times
Reputation: 75
And the saga continues!!!! It's a southern southeastern state with influences from the deep south, upper south and mid atlantic.
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:31 PM
 
68 posts, read 60,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Just what is "Southern Charm" and what would it look like? I believe it exists only in books. I've been here for 5-1/2 years and I still don't know what it actually is.

I also take issue with the statement that NC is mostly rural. As is every other state in the nation except for New Jersey. I recently saw an aerial photo of the houses on the waterfront at the Hamptons. Do you know what is directly across the street from some of those multi-million dollar estates? Corn fields.

Even California with it bulging population is mostly rural. Once you get outside of the LA megalopolis it's all rural. And California is a big state.

I live in Greenville now and if this area has a southern charm then so does just about everywhere else. The Gateway to the city dumps you right into the poorest part of town. Looking Good! Once you get out of there it is nothing but sprawl as far as the eye can see. It looks just like anywhere else on the East Coast.

And in Greenville you're just as likely not to hear a southern accent as you are to hear one.

Raleigh, Durham and Cary are the same way. Mile after mile after mile of houses and businesses. Big box store here, big box store there. Sub division here, condos there.

And if southern charm is an old town, like Kinston, that time passed right on by, then you can keep that.
So you are in fact telling me that you think there is no difference between Greenville and Raleigh etc with the rest of the east coast? You're saying Greenville looks like DC, Baltimore, New York City, Newark, Philidelphia, and Boston? I would have to disagree. The first thing is if you're from the south born and raised you will come to realize there is much more to a states charm than just the people in the state. It's the longleaf pines that you see in Greenville that are native to only the southern USA. It's the cotton fields and tobacco fields in Greenville, as well as the confederate monument in the downtown area. It's the religious demographics and weather of the sunbelt and foods done southern style. It's the tidewater southern accent which is common in Greenville and is heard quite frequently. It's just not that stereotypical accent that you're expecting to hear which is probably why you overlooked it. Like i previously said Greenville's southern sway has been diluted a bit obviously due to the college of ECU. Also keep in mind that yes most of NC is rural as well as most of the USA but when I mean rural I mean the rural parts tend to be a much better example of NC in terms of what you would expect to see when you come to the south. In a nut shell what I'm saying is there is much more to NC than just Raleigh area, Charlotte area, Asheville, and the Triad in NC. NC is a pretty good size state and has a lot more to it than just cities. Greenville is a southern city, Philly is a northern city. Similarities you can always find in cities but the difference between southern cities and northern or mid atlantic cities is more than noticeable. Same applies for rural, there will be similarities and differences.
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Due North of Potemkin City Limits
1,237 posts, read 752,672 times
Reputation: 1096
Geographically, culturally, politically....WHATEVER. It's ALL Southern! All of it! From the highest mountain peaks in the northwest of the state, to the marshy swamplands in the east with moss-draped oaks and little gimpy Palmetto trees! It's a southern state. Period.
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